Kingston, New Jersey

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Kingston, New Jersey
Census-designated place
Map of Kingston showing section in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County in New Jersey.
Map of Kingston showing section in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County in New Jersey.
Coordinates: 40°23′14″N 74°36′55″W / 40.387103°N 74.6152°W / 40.387103; -74.6152Coordinates: 40°23′14″N 74°36′55″W / 40.387103°N 74.6152°W / 40.387103; -74.6152[1][2]
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyMiddlesex
Somerset
TownshipSouth Brunswick (Middlesex)
Franklin (Somerset)
Area[2]
 • Total2.326 sq mi (6.025 km2)
 • Land2.238 sq mi (5.796 km2)
 • Water0.088 sq mi (0.229 km2)  3.80%
Elevation[3]121 ft (37 m)
Population (2010 Census)[4]
 • Total1,493
 • Density646.8/sq mi (249.7/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code08528[5]
Area code(s)609
FIPS code3436930[6]
GNIS feature ID02584006[7]
 
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Not to be confused with Barclay-Kingston, New Jersey or Kingston Estates, New Jersey.
Kingston, New Jersey
Census-designated place
Map of Kingston showing section in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County in New Jersey.
Map of Kingston showing section in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County in New Jersey.
Coordinates: 40°23′14″N 74°36′55″W / 40.387103°N 74.6152°W / 40.387103; -74.6152Coordinates: 40°23′14″N 74°36′55″W / 40.387103°N 74.6152°W / 40.387103; -74.6152[1][2]
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyMiddlesex
Somerset
TownshipSouth Brunswick (Middlesex)
Franklin (Somerset)
Area[2]
 • Total2.326 sq mi (6.025 km2)
 • Land2.238 sq mi (5.796 km2)
 • Water0.088 sq mi (0.229 km2)  3.80%
Elevation[3]121 ft (37 m)
Population (2010 Census)[4]
 • Total1,493
 • Density646.8/sq mi (249.7/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code08528[5]
Area code(s)609
FIPS code3436930[6]
GNIS feature ID02584006[7]

Kingston is a census-designated place and unincorporated community of South Brunswick Township in Middlesex County, and Franklin Township in Somerset County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey.[8][9][10][11] At the 2010 United States Census, the CDP's population was 1,493, of which 1,222 were in South Brunswick Township and 271 in Franklin Township.[4]

The New Jersey State Planning Commission created the Kingston Village Advisory Committee to address issues related to this distinct area. Both South Brunswick and Franklin appoint members to the committee, which holds an annual meeting to discuss issues pertinent to the Kingston area.[12]

Kingston is located in five historic districts and is part of the Millstone River Valley Scenic Byway. The Delaware and Raritan Canal and Rockingham State Historic Site are a short distance away.[13]

History[edit]

Jediah Higgins purchased 1,000 acres (4.0 km2) from the Native Americans in the early 18th century and the town of Kingston was established.[14] Kingston's location on the Lenape Assunpink Trail where it crossed the Millstone River and later becoming part of the King's Highway was the prime factor in its early prominence.

Geography[edit]

Kingston is located at 40°23′14″N 74°36′55″W / 40.387103°N 74.6152°W / 40.387103; -74.6152 (40.387103,-74.6152). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP had a total area of 2.326 square miles (6.025 km2), of which, 2.238 square miles (5.796 km2) of it is land and 0.088 square miles (0.229 km2) of it (3.80%) is water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
19901,047
20001,29223.4%
20101,49315.6%
Population sources:
1990-2010[10] 2000[15] 2010[4]

Census 2010[edit]

Middlesex County portion[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 1,222 people, 533 households, and 302.7 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,396.4 per square mile (539.2 /km2). There were 566 housing units at an average density of 646.8 per square mile (249.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the CDP was 71.28% (871) White, 6.30% (77) Black or African American, 0.25% (3) Native American, 14.73% (180) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 5.32% (65) from other races, and 2.13% (26) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 10.64% (130) of the population.[4]

There were 533 households of which 26.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.8% were married couples living together, 5.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 43.2% were non-families. 37.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 3.10.[4]

In the CDP, 22.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 27.5% from 25 to 44, 30.4% from 45 to 64, and 12.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.9 years. For every 100 females there were 94.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.6 males.[4]

Somerset County portion[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 271 people, 124 households, and 80.97 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 198.9 per square mile (76.8 /km2). There were 126 housing units at an average density of 92.5 per square mile (35.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the CDP was 94.10% (255) White, 2.58% (7) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 2.21% (6) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.74% (2) from other races, and 0.37% (1) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.54% (15) of the population.[4]

There were 124 households of which 23.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.4% were married couples living together, 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.7% were non-families. 28.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.19 and the average family size was 2.68.[4]

In the CDP, 16.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.1% from 18 to 24, 28.8% from 25 to 44, 31.4% from 45 to 64, and 19.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.5 years. For every 100 females there were 103.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.8 males.[4]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[6] there were 1,292 people, 561 households, and 315 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 554.3/km2 (1,440.9/mi2). There were 576 housing units at an average density of 247.1/km2 (642.4/mi2). The racial makeup of the CDP was 74.07% White, 8.05% African American, 0.62% Native American, 10.06% Asian, 4.33% from other races, and 2.86% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.69% of the population.[15]

There were 561 households out of which 24.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.7% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 43.7% were non-families. 36.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 3.08.[15]

In the CDP the population was spread out with 20.3% under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 36.4% from 25 to 44, 23.1% from 45 to 64, and 13.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 93.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.7 males.[15]

The median income for a household in the CDP was $65,962, and the median income for a family was $80,242. Males had a median income of $56,371 versus $46,250 for females. The per capita income for Kingston was $34,457. None of the families and 1.0% of the population were living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and none of those over 64.[15]

Religion[edit]

Kingston Presbyterian Church[edit]

The Kingston Presbyterian Church was organized in 1723 and was initially located in a log building adjacent to the Millstone River. The old tombstones surround the site where the church once stood in the Kingston Cemetery. The Reverend Eleazer Wales was the first recorded minister of the church. The original church building in the cemetery burned down in 1791, and new building was erected in 1792 on the original foundation. The congregation used this building until 1852, when the larger building on Main Street in Kingston was constructed on land purchased from Elijah Stout. In 1853, the church building in the cemetery was sold and was later dismantled.[14] Two additions were constructed on the 1852 site. Sunday school rooms were added to the back of the structure in the late 1940s. In the late 1980s another addition was added which added a new kitchen facility, additional space in the assembly room, pastors study and office.

The church suffered through some difficult times during the remainder of the 1700s. During this period, Princeton University was built and the village of Princeton expanded, while the population of Kingston declined. (At that time, Kingston extended as far as Snowden Lane.) Consequently, the church lost many members to the "new" Presbyterian Church down the road in Princeton.

It was also during this time that the Revolutionary War was fought in the area, and British officers were quartered in local homes. Gen. Washington became a recognizable figure in the Kingston area at the time. Not only did he lead his troops past the church to escape Cornwallis, but he also had his headquarters hardly a mile from the church while the Continental Congress sat in Nassau Hall.

The original church building in the cemetery burned down in 1791, and another was erected in 1792 on the same foundation. The congregation worshipped in this frame structure until 1852, when the present building on Main Street in Kingston was constructed on land purchased from Elijah Stout. In 1853, the church building in the cemetery was sold.

In 1800, the Kingston Presbyterian Church began a period of prosperity and growth, which continues to this day. The church sent its first foreign missionaries to China in the early 1800s.

Kingston United Methodist Church[edit]

During the month of February 1878, the people of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Rocky Hill brought an evangelist, Miss Lizzie Sharp, to conduct revival meetings in their church. There were some twenty or more of Kingston people who attended these meetings, and who decided to form a Methodist church in Kingston. A site was purchased for $250 on what is now Church Street, across from the Kingston Cemetery. Building began September 20, 1878, and was completed and dedicated on January 30, 1879. A nursery was later added.[16]

National Register of Historic Places[edit]

The following sites and districts in Kingston are listed on the National Register of Historic Places:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  3. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Kingston Census Designated Place, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed November 29, 2012.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Kingston CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 29, 2012.
  5. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Kingston, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  6. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  8. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 11, 2013.
  9. ^ 2006-2010 American Community Survey Geography for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 11, 2013.
  10. ^ a b New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed February 11, 2013.
  11. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 29, 2012.
  12. ^ Home page, Kingston Village Advisory Committee. Accessed November 29, 2012.
  13. ^ Brahms, William B. Franklin Township, Somerset County, NJ: A History, FTPL; ISBN 0-9668586-0-3
  14. ^ a b "Kingston Presbyterian Church". Kingston Presbyterian. Retrieved 2008-07-18. 
  15. ^ a b c d e DP-1 - Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 from the Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Kingston CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 29, 2012.
  16. ^ History, Kingston United Methodist Church. Accessed August 11, 2012.

External links[edit]