Kid President

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Robby Novak
Robby Novak ("Kid President")
Kid President as he appeared in a video with President Barack Obama to promote the 2013 White House Easter Egg Roll
Born(2003-10-24) October 24, 2003 (age 10)
Henderson, Tennessee
Other namesKid President
OccupationStudent
Known forThe "Kid President" inspirational video series on YouTube
 
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Robby Novak
Robby Novak ("Kid President")
Kid President as he appeared in a video with President Barack Obama to promote the 2013 White House Easter Egg Roll
Born(2003-10-24) October 24, 2003 (age 10)
Henderson, Tennessee
Other namesKid President
OccupationStudent
Known forThe "Kid President" inspirational video series on YouTube

Robby Novak (born October 24, 2003), better known by the nickname Kid President, is a TED speaker ("Inspirer"),[1] and a YouTube sensation, interviewing US President Barack Obama, Beyoncé, Andrew WK, Pen Ward, Rainn Wilson, Ban Ki-Moon, and others. He obtained an interview with Josh Groban after an ambitious Twitter campaign, where he had his followers petition Josh.[2] He and his brother-in-law, Brad Montague, have created a series of viral inspirational videos, on a mission to "Make the world less boring," including one which by the end of January 2013 had over 4 million views on YouTube.[3][4] He makes videos weekly, in collaboration with Soul Pancake.[5] He has several catchphrases and recurring jokes, including screaming, "Not cool, Robert Frost!" (when referring to his poem The Road Not Taken),[6] and asking "What will be your Space Jam?".[7] Kid President calls himself "the voice of a generation." [8] On February 21, 2013, Kid President posted a video in which President Obama called Kid President to promote the 2013 White House Easter Egg Roll.[9]

Origin[edit]

Kid President, originally a rather modest creation of Freed-Hardeman University Office of Marketing and University Relations to promote the school’s annual benefit dinner, has exploded into something much larger. A series of episodes urging viewers “to make the world awesome”, “be a party” and "to give the world a reason to dance" have gone viral on YouTube.[10]

Recent activity[edit]

Kid President's first viral video, “A Pep Talk,” has been viewed over thirty million times. It is dedicated to Gabbi Cook, two-year old daughter of Matt and Charla Cook (both FHU alumni) who recently had a liver transplant.

Kid President began as a method to promote Freed-Hardeman’s annual benefit dinner with Condoleezza Rice. Robby had helped to promote the previous benefit dinner featuring Bob Newhart. He reprised his role as promoter, this time as Kid President. Since that beginning, he has further developed, defined and promoted the character.[10]

On February 21, 2013, Kid President was featured in an official White House video to promote the 2013 White House Easter Egg Roll. He appears in a simulated telephone conversation with President Barack Obama.[11][12]

On March 20, 2013, ESPN released a video called "Kid President NCAA Tournament Bracket 2013," where he makes choices for the outcomes of the games of the 2013 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament.[13] In the video, he references President Obama's "Barack-etology," Mr. Obama's own choices for the outcome of the tournament.[14] Kid President chooses Gonzaga (his favorite team) to beat Michigan in the championship game.

On April 1, 2013, the White House released "a special video message from the President"[15] featuring Kid President as an April Fool's joke.

Portrayal[edit]

Kid President is portrayed by Robby Novak. Novak and his sister Alexia were born with osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease).[16] Novak is the son of David, member of the FHU staff, and Laurie Novak.[10]

“We’re overwhelmed and honored that so many have connected with Kid President. We hope it encourages others to take positive action in their lives,” Brad Montague, who directs FHU’s Go! Camp and created "Kid President", said. Go! Camp is a service-oriented week-long effort held each summer at FHU. “It is about empowering kids, helping them to have a voice. That’s what we hope these videos do too.” [10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Kid President | Profile on TED.com". TED Conferences, LLC. Retrieved 2 February 2013. 
  2. ^ "Kid President YouTube channel". soulpancake. Retrieved February 1, 2013. 
  3. ^ Coffey, Laura T. (January 30, 2013). "Kid President,' 9, is on a mission: To make grown-ups less boring". TODAY SHOW. 
  4. ^ "A Pep Talk from Kid President to You". soulpancake. Retrieved February 1, 2013. 
  5. ^ "Kid President by SoulPancake (YouTube channel)". SoulPancake YouTube Channel. SoulPancake LLC. Retrieved 5 February 2013. 
  6. ^ "Kid President's Pep Talk Is The Only One We Need". Huffington Post. 2013-01-26. 
  7. ^ "Find your 'Space Jam'". January 30, 2013. 
  8. ^ Dukes, Derek (Jan 27, 2013). ""Kid President" the voice of a generation?". FOX Atlanta. 
  9. ^ "President Obama sends Kid President a Message". YouTube. SoulPancake. Retrieved 22 February 2013. 
  10. ^ a b c d "Kid President to Appear on Today Show Wednesday". Freed-Hardeman University. Retrieved February 22, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Easter Egg Roll--The White House". The White House. Retrieved 22 February 2013. 
  12. ^ "Introducing the 2013 White House Easter Egg Roll". YouTube. Retrieved 22 February 2013. 
  13. ^ "Kid President NCAA Tournament Bracket 2013". YouTube. ESPN. Retrieved 21 March 2013. 
  14. ^ Humes, Michael. "Barack-etology: President Obama Again Fills Out Men’s & Women’s Brackets in ESPN Exclusive". ESPN Media Zone. ESPN. Retrieved 21 March 2013. 
  15. ^ "The White House Blog". The White House. Retrieved 1 April 2013. 
  16. ^ "'Kid President,' 9, is on a mission: To make grown-ups less boring". Today.com. Retrieved February 2, 2013. 

External links[edit]