Kevin Sabet

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Kevin Abraham Sabet
Born1979
Ft. Wayne, Indiana
ResidenceWashington, DC and Cambridge, MA
CitizenshipAmerican
NationalityU.S.
FieldsDrug Policy, Public Policy, Journalism
InstitutionsThe White House, ONDCP
Alma materUniversity of California, Berkeley
Oxford University
Doctoral advisorGeorge Smith
Other academic advisorsBruce Cain
William "Sandy" Muir
Known forA "Third Way" in Drug Policy
InfluencesDavid F. Musto
Robert L. DuPont
Notable awardsMarshall Scholarship
 
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Kevin Abraham Sabet
Born1979
Ft. Wayne, Indiana
ResidenceWashington, DC and Cambridge, MA
CitizenshipAmerican
NationalityU.S.
FieldsDrug Policy, Public Policy, Journalism
InstitutionsThe White House, ONDCP
Alma materUniversity of California, Berkeley
Oxford University
Doctoral advisorGeorge Smith
Other academic advisorsBruce Cain
William "Sandy" Muir
Known forA "Third Way" in Drug Policy
InfluencesDavid F. Musto
Robert L. DuPont
Notable awardsMarshall Scholarship

Kevin A. Sabet (born February 20, 1979) is an assistant professor of psychiatry, Director of the Drug Policy Institute at the University of Florida, a consultant, professor, author, and drug policy advisor. With Patrick J. Kennedy, he co-founded Project SAM (Smart Approaches to Marijuana) in January 2013.[1] In February of 2013, Salon Magazine referred to Kevin as "the quarterback of the new anti-drug movement." [2] NBC News calls Kevin a "prodigy of drug politics.".[3] He is the only drug policy staffer to have served as a political appointee in two US administrations of opposing parties. In 2013, he received the Italian Minister of International Cooperation's highest honor (given by Minister Andrea Riccardi, (a centrist in the Monti government). [4] In 2014, he headlined an event with H.M Queen Silvia of Sweden and was given the Nils Bejerot Award at Stockholm City Hall. [5] He is the author of numerous articles and monographs, and a book, "Reefer Sanity: Seven Great Myths About Marijuana" (Beaufort). [6]. Ryan Grim, the Washington bureau chief for The Huffington Post once said that, "For backers of pot legalization, Kevin Sabet is dangerous, because he can’t be easily dismissed as a reefer-madness-style propagandist. The marijuana reform community should play close attention to his arguments, and the prohibitionists, if they have any plans to reverse the tide, should do the same.” [7]

Education and career[edit]

Sabet is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley and Oxford University, where he received his Doctorate in social policy as a Marshall Scholar. He served as Senior Adviser for Policy to White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) Director R. Gil Kerlikowske from 2009-2011.[8] He was a political appointee employee in the Administration of Barack Obama (2009–2011) and he also served as a political appointee for a short time in the Administration of George W. Bush (2003–2004) - making him the only political appointee at ONDCP to serve in both Administrations. He also worked as a policy researcher at ONDCP during the Administration of Bill Clinton. He is an outspoken opponent of drug legalization, and spoke often on behalf of the Obama Administration on the subject.[9] He is known to have co-written President Obama's first National Drug Control Strategy. After leaving ONDCP after 2.5 years, he became a consultant and professor. In January 2013, Rolling Stone called him "Legalization Enemy #1" ahead of the US Drug Czar and the DEA Administrator.[10]

Currently, he is the Director of the Drug Policy Institute at the University of Florida [11] and is President of a drug policy consulting company, Policy Solutions Lab, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He is also a regular contributor to TV and print media [12] and is a blogger for the Huffington Post.[13] Most of his recent media mentions relate to Project SAM.[14]

Drug Policy Field[edit]

Sabet first received notice in California when at age 15, he publicly blasted the conservative-libertarian wing of the Orange County school board for refusing to accept federal dollars for after school anti-drug programs aimed at underprivileged students.[15] Soon, Sabet drew national attention for his anti-drug work. By age 19 had worked with NIDA Director Alan Leshner on MDMA education efforts,and by age 20 he had testimony entered on the official House record.[16]

He has written on the need for prevention, treatment, and enforcement to guide drug policy, though he has also argued for abolishing severe sentencing guidelines, like mandatory minimum laws.[17] His articles have been published in newspapers such as the Washington Post, the New York Times (an op-ed by Sabet on January 2, 2012 was one of the only nonlegalization drug policy pieces the Times has run in the past decade),[18] the San Francisco Chronicle, the Los Angeles Times, the Vancouver Sun, and the Seattle Times, and in numerous books and academic journals. He has received the "Best Five Columns" distinction twice from The Atlantic.

Personal[edit]

He was married in 2008 to Shahrzad Sabet. Their wedding was featured in Real Weddings magazine.[19] He is a former junior competitive tennis player in Southern California.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.learnaboutsam.org
  2. ^ http://www.salon.com/2013/02/13/meet_the_quarterback_of_the_new_anti_drug_movement/
  3. ^ http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/legal-pot/treatment-or-jail-patrick-kennedy-wages-fierce-anti-pot-crusade-n22256
  4. ^ http://www.politicheantidroga.it/comunicazione/eventi/incontro-italia-usa-strategie-di-prevenzione-dell%E2%80%99uso-di-sostanze-misure-alternative-al-carcere-l%E2%80%99esperienza-delle-%E2%80%9Cdrug-court%E2%80%9D/le-immagini.aspx
  5. ^ http://www.wfad.se/the-3rd-nils-bejerot-award
  6. ^ http://www.reefersanity.net
  7. ^ http://www.reefersanity.net/#!praise/c1pz
  8. ^ http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/commentary/la-oe-sabet-prohibition-20111005,0,4074800.story
  9. ^ http://billingsgazette.com/news/state-and-regional/montana/article_21fcbb0a-c831-11df-ad35-001cc4c03286.html
  10. ^ http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/legalizations-biggest-enemies-20130117
  11. ^ http://drugpolicyinstitute.psychiatry.ufl.edu/our-fellows/
  12. ^ http://kevinsabet.com/category/media
  13. ^ http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kevin-a-sabet-phd
  14. ^ http://www.learnaboutsam.org
  15. ^ http://nl.newsbank.com/nl-search/we/Archives?p_product=OC&p_theme=oc&p_action=search&p_maxdocs=200&p_text_search-0=kevin%20AND%20sabet&s_dispstring=kevin%20sabet%20AND%20date(all)&xcal_numdocs=20&p_perpage=10&p_sort=YMD_date:D&xcal_useweights=no
  16. ^ http://www.drugsense.org/fdch.htm
  17. ^ http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/12/01/AR2006120101324.html
  18. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/02/opinion/drug-policy-needs-centrists.html?_r=1&ref=opinion
  19. ^ http://blog.realweddings.ca/a-moveable-feast/

External links[edit]