Kevin Sabet

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Kevin Abraham Sabet
Born1979
Ft. Wayne, Indiana
ResidenceWashington, DC and Cambridge, MA
CitizenshipAmerican
NationalityU.S.
FieldsDrug Policy, Public Policy, Journalism
InstitutionsThe White House, ONDCP
Alma materUniversity of California, Berkeley
Oxford University
Doctoral advisorGeorge Smith
Other academic advisorsBruce Cain
William "Sandy" Muir
Known forA "Third Way" in Drug Policy
InfluencesDavid F. Musto
Robert L. DuPont
Notable awardsMarshall Scholarship
 
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Kevin Abraham Sabet
Born1979
Ft. Wayne, Indiana
ResidenceWashington, DC and Cambridge, MA
CitizenshipAmerican
NationalityU.S.
FieldsDrug Policy, Public Policy, Journalism
InstitutionsThe White House, ONDCP
Alma materUniversity of California, Berkeley
Oxford University
Doctoral advisorGeorge Smith
Other academic advisorsBruce Cain
William "Sandy" Muir
Known forA "Third Way" in Drug Policy
InfluencesDavid F. Musto
Robert L. DuPont
Notable awardsMarshall Scholarship

Kevin A. Sabet (born February 20, 1979) is an assistant professor of psychiatry, and Director of the Drug Policy Institute at the University of Florida.[1] With Patrick J. Kennedy, he co-founded Project SAM (Smart Approaches to Marijuana) in January 2013.[2] He is also the author of numerous articles and monographs, as well as "Reefer Sanity: Seven Great Myths About Marijuana."[3]

Education and career[edit]

Sabet is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley and Oxford University,[4] where he received his Doctorate in social policy as a Marshall Scholar. He is an outspoken opponent of drug legalization, and spoke often on behalf of the Obama Administration on the subject.[5] After leaving ONDCP after 2.5 years, he became a consultant and professor. In January 2013, Rolling Stone called him "Legalization Enemy #1" ahead of the US Drug Czar and the DEA Administrator.[6]

Currently, he is the Director of the Drug Policy Institute at the University of Florida.[7] He is also a regular contributor to TV and print media [8] and is a blogger for the Huffington Post.[9] Most of his recent media mentions relate to Project SAM.[10]

Drug Policy Field[edit]

Sabet drew national attention for his anti-drug work. By age 19 had worked with NIDA Director Alan Leshner on MDMA education efforts,and by age 20 he had testimony entered on the official House record.[11]

He has written on the need for prevention, treatment, and enforcement to guide drug policy, though he has also argued for abolishing severe sentencing guidelines, like mandatory minimum laws.[12] His articles have been published in newspapers such as the Washington Post, the New York Times.[13]

Personal[edit]

He was married in 2008 to Shahrzad Sabet.[14] Kevin and his wife are both Bahá'í of Iranian descent.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://psychiatry.ufl.edu/faculty-3/#S
  2. ^ "SAM - Smart Approaches to Marijuana". Learnaboutsam.org. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  3. ^ "Kevin Sabet - Reefer Sanity by Kevin Sabet". Reefersanity.net. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  4. ^ http://psychiatry.ufl.edu/faculty-3/#S
  5. ^ MIKE DENNISON Gazette State Bureau (2010-09-24). "Obama drug-policy adviser says the administration opposes marijuana legalization and isn’t big on medical marijuana". Billingsgazette.com. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  6. ^ "Legalization's Biggest Enemies | Politics News". Rolling Stone. 2013-01-17. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  7. ^ "Our Fellows » Drug Policy Institute » College of Medicine » University of Florida". Drugpolicyinstitute.psychiatry.ufl.edu. 2014-05-30. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  8. ^ "Media". Kevin Sabet. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  9. ^ "Kevin A. Sabet, Ph.D". Huffingtonpost.com. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  10. ^ "SAM - Smart Approaches to Marijuana". Learnaboutsam.org. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  11. ^ "House Government Reform Criminal Justice Subcommittee Holds Hearing On Drug Policy". Drugsense.org. 1999-06-16. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  12. ^ "Kevin A. Sabet - A Third Way On Drug Laws". Washingtonpost.com. 2006-12-04. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 
  13. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/02/opinion/drug-policy-needs-centrists.html?_r=1&ref=opinion
  14. ^ Louise Phillips (2008-07-23). "A MOVEABLE FEAST". Washingtonpost.com. Retrieved 2014-06-09. 

External links[edit]