Kerr County, Texas

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Kerr County, Texas
Kerr C IMG 0918.JPG
Kerr County Courthouse, southside view
Map of Texas highlighting Kerr County
Location in the state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded1856
Named forJames Kerr
SeatKerrville
Largest cityKerrville
Area
 • Total1,107 sq mi (2,867 km2)
 • Land1,103 sq mi (2,857 km2)
 • Water4 sq mi (10 km2), 0.4%
Population
 • (2010)49,625
 • Density39/sq mi (15/km²)
Congressional district21st
Time zoneCentral: UTC-6/-5
Websitewww.co.kerr.tx.us
 
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Kerr County, Texas
Kerr C IMG 0918.JPG
Kerr County Courthouse, southside view
Map of Texas highlighting Kerr County
Location in the state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded1856
Named forJames Kerr
SeatKerrville
Largest cityKerrville
Area
 • Total1,107 sq mi (2,867 km2)
 • Land1,103 sq mi (2,857 km2)
 • Water4 sq mi (10 km2), 0.4%
Population
 • (2010)49,625
 • Density39/sq mi (15/km²)
Congressional district21st
Time zoneCentral: UTC-6/-5
Websitewww.co.kerr.tx.us

Kerr County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 49,625.[1] Its county seat is Kerrville.[2] The county was named by Joshua D. Brown for his fellow Kentucky native, James Kerr, a congressman of the Republic of Texas.

The Kerrville, TX Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Kerr County.

History Timeline[edit]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,107 square miles (2,870 km2), of which 1,103 square miles (2,860 km2) is land and 4 square miles (10 km2) (0.4%) is water.[26]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
1860634
18701,04264.4%
18802,168108.1%
18904,462105.8%
19004,98011.6%
19105,50510.5%
19205,8426.1%
193010,15173.8%
194011,65014.8%
195014,02220.4%
196016,80019.8%
197019,45415.8%
198028,78047.9%
199036,30426.1%
200043,65320.2%
201049,62513.7%
Est. 201249,7860.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[27]
1850-2010[28]
2012 Estimate[1]

As of the census[29] of 2000, there were 43,653 people, 17,813 households, and 12,308 families residing in the county. The population density was 40 people per square mile (15/km²). There were 20,228 housing units at an average density of 18 per square mile (7/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 88.89% White, 1.78% Black or African American, 0.56% Native American, 0.51% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 6.60% from other races, and 1.62% from two or more races. 19.13% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 17,813 households out of which 25.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.80% were married couples living together, 9.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.90% were non-families. 27.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.84.

In the county, the population was spread out with 22.70% under the age of 18, 6.70% from 18 to 24, 22.20% from 25 to 44, 23.50% from 45 to 64, and 24.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 92.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $34,283, and the median income for a family was $40,713. Males had a median income of $27,425 versus $21,149 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,767. About 10.30% of families and 14.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.60% of those under age 18 and 8.40% of those age 65 or over.

Popular culture[edit]

Communities[edit]

Cities and towns[edit]

Unincorporated[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 18, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ a b c d Odintz, Mark. "Kerr County". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  4. ^ Brister, Louis E. "Adelsverein". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  5. ^ Ramos, Mary G. "The German Settlements in Central Texas". Texas Almanac. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  6. ^ "Indianola, Texas". Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  7. ^ Block, W T. "The Story of our Texas' German Pilgrims". Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  8. ^ "History Kerr County". Kerr County Historical Association. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  9. ^ Biesele, R L; The Texas State Convention of Germans in 1854 (April 1930). The Southwestern Historical Quarterly. XXXIII (24). 
  10. ^ "Camp Verde". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  11. ^ "Camel Corps". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  12. ^ "Center Point". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  13. ^ Moneyhon, Charles H. "The Union League". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  14. ^ Shook, Robert W. "Duff, James". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  15. ^ "Spring Creek Cemetery". Texas Gen Web. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  16. ^ Tegener, Gus at Find a Grave
  17. ^ "Treue der UnionMonument". Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  18. ^ "List of Dead-Treue Der Union Monument". Texas Gen Web. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  19. ^ Hollon, W Eugene. "Charles Schreiner". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  20. ^ Herring, Rebecca. "Veterans Affairs Center-Kerrville". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  21. ^ Baulch, Joe R. "Schreiner University". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  22. ^ "Camp Waldemar". Camp Waldemar. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  23. ^ "Mooney Aircraft". Mooney Aviation Company, Inc. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  24. ^ "Peterson Regional Medical Center". Peterson Regional Medical Center. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  25. ^ "Kerrville State Hospital". State of Texas. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  26. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  27. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved December 18, 2013. 
  28. ^ Texas Almanac: County Population History 1850-2010 Retrieved December 18, 2013
  29. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  30. ^ Treat, Wesley. "StoneHenge II - A Megalithic Facsimile". Retrieved 2011-03-25. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 30°04′N 99°21′W / 30.06°N 99.35°W / 30.06; -99.35