Kenton, Ohio

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Kenton, Ohio
City
Aerial view of Kenton from the southwest
Aerial view of Kenton from the southwest
Motto: "The Key To Your Future!"
Location of Kenton, Ohio
Location of Kenton, Ohio
Coordinates: 40°38′48″N 83°36′31″W / 40.64667°N 83.60861°W / 40.64667; -83.60861Coordinates: 40°38′48″N 83°36′31″W / 40.64667°N 83.60861°W / 40.64667; -83.60861
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyHardin
Government
 • MayorRandy Manns
Area[1]
 • Total5.13 sq mi (13.29 km2)
 • Land5.04 sq mi (13.05 km2)
 • Water0.09 sq mi (0.23 km2)
Elevation[2]991 ft (302 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total8,262
 • Estimate (2012[4])8,195
 • Density1,639.3/sq mi (632.9/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code43326
Area code(s)419 567
FIPS code39-39886[5]
GNIS feature ID1064929[2]
Websitehttp://www.kentoncity.com/
 
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Kenton, Ohio
City
Aerial view of Kenton from the southwest
Aerial view of Kenton from the southwest
Motto: "The Key To Your Future!"
Location of Kenton, Ohio
Location of Kenton, Ohio
Coordinates: 40°38′48″N 83°36′31″W / 40.64667°N 83.60861°W / 40.64667; -83.60861Coordinates: 40°38′48″N 83°36′31″W / 40.64667°N 83.60861°W / 40.64667; -83.60861
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyHardin
Government
 • MayorRandy Manns
Area[1]
 • Total5.13 sq mi (13.29 km2)
 • Land5.04 sq mi (13.05 km2)
 • Water0.09 sq mi (0.23 km2)
Elevation[2]991 ft (302 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total8,262
 • Estimate (2012[4])8,195
 • Density1,639.3/sq mi (632.9/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code43326
Area code(s)419 567
FIPS code39-39886[5]
GNIS feature ID1064929[2]
Websitehttp://www.kentoncity.com/

Kenton is a city in and the county seat of Hardin County, Ohio, United States,[6] along the Scioto River. The population was 8,262 at the 2010 census. The city was named for frontiersman Simon Kenton of Kentucky and Ohio.

Geography[edit]

Kenton is located at 40°38′48″N 83°36′31″W / 40.64667°N 83.60861°W / 40.64667; -83.60861 (40.646555, -83.608706).[7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.13 square miles (13.29 km2), of which, 5.04 square miles (13.05 km2) is land and 0.09 square miles (0.23 km2) is water.[1]

History[edit]

In 1845, Kenton was incorporated as a village; it became a city in 1886. Kenton was named after frontiersman Simon Kenton.

The city began as a center for agriculture trade, then in the late nineteenth century developed industry common to America of the time.[8] From 1890 to 1952, Kenton was home to the Kenton Hardware Company, manufacturers of locks, cast-iron toys, and the very popular Gene Autry toy cap guns.[9]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
18501,065
18601,61251.4%
18702,61061.9%
18803,94051.0%
18905,55741.0%
19006,85223.3%
19107,1854.9%
19207,6907.0%
19307,069−8.1%
19407,5937.4%
19508,47511.6%
19608,7473.2%
19708,315−4.9%
19808,6053.5%
19908,356−2.9%
20008,336−0.2%
20108,262−0.9%
Est. 20128,195−0.8%
Sources:[10][11][12][13][14][15][5][16]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[17] of 2010, there were 8,262 people, 3,351 households, and 2,092 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,836 persons per square mile (712.2/km²). There were 3,773 housing units at an average density of 838.4 per square mile (325.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.2% White, 0.9% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 0.9% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.90% of the population.

There were 3,351 households out of which 29.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.1% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a male householder with no wife present, 15.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.6% were non-families. 31.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.4 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the city the population was spread out with 28.1% under the age of 20, 6.5% from 20 to 24, 25.1% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 15.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.2 years. For every 100 females there were 88.8 males.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 8,336 people, 3,495 households, and 2,149 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,860.6 people per square mile (718.4/km²). There were 3,795 housing units at an average density of 847.0/sq mi (327.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.11% White, 0.91% African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.32% from other races, and 1.01% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.90% of the population.

There were 3,495 households out of which 29.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.0% were married couples living together, 12.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.5% were non-families. 33.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the city the population was spread out with 25.5% under the age of 18, 9.0% from 18 to 24, 28.3% from 25 to 44, 21.3% from 45 to 64, and 15.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 87.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $29,065, and the median income for a family was $37,170. Males had a median income of $31,225 versus $19,413 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,324. About 11.6% of families and 16.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.0% of those under age 18 and 17.2% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Kenton is home to the Kenton City School district, which includes three elementary schools (Espy, Northwood, and Hardin Central), Kenton Middle School, Kenton High School, and Westview, a kindergarten. Simon Kenton, a special education school, is run by a different Board of Education and is associated with the Harco Workshop for Developmental Disabilities.

Sports and recreation[edit]

The local high school is Kenton High School, with the nickname, the "Wildcats". The Wildcat football team won consecutive state championships in 2001 and 2002 in division IV, runner-up in 2012 in division IV, and runner-up in 2003 in division III.[18][19]

The city offers camping and fishing at Salsbury Park located west of Kenton on Ohio State Route 67. This city park and reservoir was named in honor of former Mayor Helen Salsbury.

Media[edit]

Two media outlets currently operate in Kenton: WKTN, a radio station, and The Kenton Times, a daily newspaper.

Attractions[edit]

Kenton has a variety of attractions and available activities. The Hardin County Courthouse is a historical site in the center of the public square. Kenton has one public library, the Mary Lou Johnson Hardin County District Library (http://www.mljlibrary.org), which was formerly located in a 1905 Carnegie library. The city also possesses a museum, the Hardin County Historical Museum, located in a near north side historic district.

Kenton also has the Kenton Theater and the Hi-Road Drive-in. The local YMCA offers basketball, lift, and swimming (the YMCA also administers an outdoor pool during the summer). Restaurants include BR Brunsons, a homestyle restaurant; En Lai, a Chinese restaurant; Salsa's Mexican Restaurant; Michael Angelo's Pizza; and Jolene's Cozy Cafe.

Kenton's large Amish population sells produce, baked goods, and furniture. The Hardin County Fair is held during the week of Labor Day.

CSX 8888 Incident[edit]

The "Crazy Eights" unmanned train incident in 2001, ended in Kenton. The train, led by CSX Transportation engine SD40-2 #8888, left the rail yard in Walbridge, Ohio, and rumbled on a 66-mile journey through northwestern Ohio with no one at the controls, due to the throttle being applied on full instead of a brake. Two of the train's tank cars contained thousands of gallons of molten phenol, a toxic ingredient of paints and dyes harmful when it is inhaled, ingested, or comes into contact with the skin. For two hours, the train traveled along at speeds of up to 47 miles per hour until the crew of a second train coupled onto the runaway and slowly applied its brakes. Once #8888 was slowed to a speed of 11 miles an hour, a CSX employee, trainmaster Jon Hosfeld, ran alongside the train and climbed aboard, shutting down the locomotive. The train was stopped just southeast of Kenton.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  5. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  8. ^ Kenton. "City of Kenton Web site". Retrieved 2011-10-14. 
  9. ^ Gene Autry cap guns. "Gene Autry cap guns". Retrieved 2011-10-14. 
  10. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties". Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  11. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties". Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  12. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  13. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  14. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio". 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  15. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  16. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  17. ^ 2010 Census. "2010 Census". Retrieved 2011-10-17. 
  18. ^ OHSAA. "Ohio High School Athletic Association Web site". Retrieved 2006-12-31. 
  19. ^ Yappi. "Yappi Sports Football". Retrieved 2007-02-12. 

External links[edit]