Karl Kruszelnicki

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Karl Kruszelnicki
A.M., BSc, MSc, M.Biomed.Eng., M.B.B.S.
Karl Kruszelnicki holding a copy of his book Sensational Moments in Science
Dr Karl at a University of Sydney open day on 26 August 2006
BornKarl Sven Woytek Sas Konkovitch Matthew Kruszelnicki[1]
1948 (age 65–66)
Helsingborg, Sweden
ResidenceSydney, Australia[2]
Other namesDr Karl
EducationEdmund Rice College
Alma materUniversity of Wollongong
OccupationScience journalist, author and broadcaster
Years active1981–present
Known forPopular science
Notable work(s)Great Moments in Science
Home townWollongong, New South Wales, Australia
TelevisionQuantum
Sleek Geeks
TitleThe Julius Sumner Miller Fellow, Science Foundation for Physics, University of Sydney
Term1994–present
AwardsIg Nobel Prize (2002)
Australian Father of the Year (2003)
Website
DrKarl.com
Dr Karl on ABC.net.au
 
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Karl Kruszelnicki
A.M., BSc, MSc, M.Biomed.Eng., M.B.B.S.
Karl Kruszelnicki holding a copy of his book Sensational Moments in Science
Dr Karl at a University of Sydney open day on 26 August 2006
BornKarl Sven Woytek Sas Konkovitch Matthew Kruszelnicki[1]
1948 (age 65–66)
Helsingborg, Sweden
ResidenceSydney, Australia[2]
Other namesDr Karl
EducationEdmund Rice College
Alma materUniversity of Wollongong
OccupationScience journalist, author and broadcaster
Years active1981–present
Known forPopular science
Notable work(s)Great Moments in Science
Home townWollongong, New South Wales, Australia
TelevisionQuantum
Sleek Geeks
TitleThe Julius Sumner Miller Fellow, Science Foundation for Physics, University of Sydney
Term1994–present
AwardsIg Nobel Prize (2002)
Australian Father of the Year (2003)
Website
DrKarl.com
Dr Karl on ABC.net.au

Karl Kruszelnicki, AM is a scientist, who is best known as an author and science commentator on Australian radio and television. He is often referred to as Dr Karl.[3]

He holds degrees in mathematics, biomedical engineering, medicine and surgery. He has also studied astrophysics, computer science, and philosophy. He has worked as a physicist, labourer, roadie for bands, car mechanic, filmmaker, hospital scientific officer, biomedical engineer, TV weatherman, taxi driver, and doctor. Kruszelnicki is the Julius Sumner Miller Fellow in the Science Foundation for Physics at the School of Physics, University of Sydney.[4]

Early life

Kruszelnicki was born in Helsingborg, Sweden, to Polish parents. His mother's background was hidden from him for a long time, with his mother having told him that she was Swedish and a Lutheran but was, in fact, Jewish. Both of his parents were Holocaust survivors.[1]

Education

Journalism, television, and radio

Kruszelnicki wrote and presented the first series of Quantum. He writes a weekly column for The Age and the Sydney Morning Herald newspapers on scientific "mythconceptions". His radio work includes a weekly science talkback show on Triple J which attracts up to 300,000 listeners and is available as a podcast. He often helps with other science and education Triple J promotions, such as the Sleek Geek Week roadshow with Adam Spencer and Caroline Pegram.

In the United Kingdom, he appears on a live weekly late-night link-up on BBC Radio 5 Live's Up All Night, usually with Rhod Sharp (Thursdays 03:00 UK time), answering science questions.

He has had cameo appearances in a number of television series including Pizza (screened on SBS) and Neighbours. In the Neighbours episode, he was confused with the Dr Karl character of that series. From early 2008 onward he co-hosted a TV series of Sleek Geeks with Adam Spencer.

Kruszelnicki fronts the Roads and Traffic Authority microsleep awareness campaign and presents segments on The Weather Channel.

Politics

Kruszelnicki was an unsuccessful candidate for the Australian Senate in the 2007 Australian federal election. He was placed number two on the Climate Change Coalition ticket in New South Wales.[6]

Recognition and awards

One of Kruszelnicki's more notable undertakings was his part in a research project on belly button fluff, for which he received an Ig Nobel Prize in 2002. He received the Australian Father of the Year award in 2003. In the 2006 Honours list, he was made a Member of the Order of Australia.[3]

In 2012, Kruszelnicki was named as a National Living Treasure by the National Trust of Australia (NSW).[7]

Main-belt asteroid 18412 Kruszelnicki has been named after him.[8]

Writing

As of late-2013, Kruszelnicki has written 33 books, along with numerous lecture series (using material that often ends up in his books, or vice versa). Some of these lecture series and books have been televised for events such as Science Week, with him supplying voice overs and sometimes appearing in claymation.

1. Ears, Gears and Gadgets, HarperCollins Publishers Pty Ltd, Australia, 1997, ISBN 0-207-19610-9.
2. Forests, Fleece & Prickly Pears, HarperCollins Publishers Pty Ltd, Australia, 1997, ISBN 0-207-19611-7
3. Flight, Food & Thingummygigs, HarperCollins Publishers Pty Ltd, Australia, 1997, ISBN 0-207-19612-5.

References

  1. ^ a b "Dr Karl Kruszelnicki Transcript". ABC. Retrieved 14 March 2012. 
  2. ^ "Author: Karl Kruszelnicki". Australia: HarperCollins. 2008. Retrieved 10 July 2010. "He lives with his family in Sydney." 
  3. ^ a b "Myth-buster Dr Karl makes honours list". Nine News (Nine MSN). Australian Associated Press. 26 January 2006. Retrieved 10 July 2010. 
  4. ^ Dr Karl Kruszelnicki — The Julius Sumner Miller Fellow – Physics – The University of Sydney. Physics.usyd.edu.au (3 May 2010). Retrieved on 22 October 2011.
  5. ^ Degrees of Karl. DrKarl.com. Retrieved on 22 October 2011.
  6. ^ Dr Karl to Run for the Senate on Climate Change. Climatechangecoalition.com.au. Retrieved on 22 October 2011.
  7. ^ "Seven added to national living treasure list". Lauren Farrow (Canberra Times). 5 March 2012. Retrieved 8 March 2012. 
  8. ^ JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 18412 Kruszelnicki (1993 LX)

External links