Judy Gold

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Judy Gold
Born(1962-11-15) November 15, 1962 (age 50)
Newark, New Jersey, U.S.
OccupationStand-up comic
Years active1991–present
Height6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
ReligionJudaism
ChildrenHenry
Ben
Website
judygold.com
 
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Judy Gold
Born(1962-11-15) November 15, 1962 (age 50)
Newark, New Jersey, U.S.
OccupationStand-up comic
Years active1991–present
Height6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
ReligionJudaism
ChildrenHenry
Ben
Website
judygold.com

Judy Gold (born November 15, 1962) is an American stand-up comic. She won two Daytime Emmy Awards for her work as a writer and producer on The Rosie O'Donnell Show.[1] She has also been involved in many projects in various roles, including the television series All American Girl and HBO At the Multiplex segments where she asks humorous questions of unexpecting moviegoers.

She first did stand-up on a dare while in college at Rutgers University.[1] She is a lesbian, shared a relationship with her former partner, Sharon, for almost 20 years, and has two children (Henry, 1996, and Ben, 2001), facts she frequently referenced in her comments on the show Tough Crowd with Colin Quinn.[2] Gold is very active in both LGBT and Jewish communities. She was active in support of the 2004 and 2008 Democratic presidential campaign.

Her one-woman show 25 Questions for a Jewish Mother, co-written with Kate Moira Ryan, is based on a series of interviews with more than 50 Jewish mothers in the United States.[3] Their stories are interspersed with anecdotes about her own mother and her life as a lesbian mother of two sons.[4] It ran at the Ars Nova Theater in New York City in early 2006 and reopened on October 12, 2006, at St. Luke's Theater.

Judy Gold also appears as a commentator on truTV's TruTV Presents: World's Dumbest....

She has also started her own (as the show's producer, Meetinghouse Productions Inc., (which also produces World's Dumbest) calls it) docu-comedy series (the first episode of which can be viewed on YouTube) about herself, family, and friends.

In 2007 she was featured in the film Making Trouble, a tribute to female Jewish comedians, produced by the Jewish Women’s Archive.[5]

In 2011, Gold was named a Givenik Ambassador.[6]

The Judy Show: My Life as a Sitcom[edit]

On June 30, 2011, The Judy Gold Show: My Life as a Sitcom, began previews at Off-Broadway's DR2 Theatre in New York City. This one-woman show is an homage to the classic sitcoms of Gold's youth. The show is written by Gold and Kate Moira Ryan and directed by Amanda Charlton.

The show officially opened on July 6, 2011 to positive reviews. The New York Times called the show "highly entertaining."[7] The New York Post called the show "gleefully self-deprecating".[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lara, Adair (December 24, 2003). "N.Y. comedian Judy Gold feels right at home in S.F.". San Francisco Chronicle. p. D-1. Retrieved 2007-03-20. [dead link]
  2. ^ TV Guide
  3. ^ Shulman, Randy (January 31, 2008). "Gold Rush: When she's not milking the room for laughs, comic Judy Gold juggles a career, two kids and her 85-year-old Jewish mother". Metro Weekly. Retrieved 2008-03-13. 
  4. ^ Hoban, Phoebe (2006-01-27). "Listen to Your Mother! And Other Advice". New York Times. Retrieved 2007-03-20. 
  5. ^ Deming, Mark. "Making Trouble: Three Generations of Funny Jewish Women". New York Times. Retrieved 14 April 2012. 
  6. ^ Gioia, Michael. "John Tartaglia and Judy Gold Are New Givenik Ambassadors (Video)". Playbill.com. Playbill. 
  7. ^ Rooney, David (July 8, 2011). "‘The Judy Show: My Life as a Sitcom' - Review". The New York Times. 
  8. ^ Vincentelli, Elisabeth (July 11, 2011). "Self-deprecation adds punch to 'Judy&apos". New York Post. 

External links[edit]