Joseph McMoneagle

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Joseph McMoneagle
Born(1946-01-10) January 10, 1946 (age 67)
Miami, Florida
NationalityAmerican
Known forRemote viewing
 
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Joseph McMoneagle
Born(1946-01-10) January 10, 1946 (age 67)
Miami, Florida
NationalityAmerican
Known forRemote viewing

Joseph McMoneagle (born January 10, 1946, in Miami, Florida) was involved in remote viewing experiments conducted by U.S. Army Intelligence and the Stanford Research Institute. He was one of the original officers recruited for the top-secret program now known as the Stargate Project. Along with Ingo Swann, McMoneagle is best known for claims surrounding the investigation of remote viewing and the use of paranormal abilities for military intelligence gathering.

Career[edit]

McMoneagle was known as "Remote Viewer No. 1" in the US Army's psychic intelligence unit at Fort Meade, Maryland.[1] At his retirement McMoneagle earned his Legion of Merit for his last 10 years of service, including 5 years of work in SIGINT, SIGnals INTelligence, and 5 years in the RV program.[2][3][4][5]

After his time in the military, McMoneagle became a speaker at the Monroe Institute,[6] where he had previously been sent as part of his remote viewing training.[7] McMoneagle currently runs a remote viewing business aimed at the corporate world called Intuitive Intelligence Applications, Inc.[8]

Claims[edit]

According to McMoneagle, remote viewing is possible and accurate outside the boundaries of time.[9] He believes he has remote-viewed into the past, present, and future and has predicted future events. Among the subjects he claims to have remote-viewed are a Chinese nuclear facility, the Iranian hostage crisis, the Red Brigades, and Muammar Qadhafi.[1] He writes that he predicted the location and existence of the Soviet "Typhoon"-class submarine in 1979, and that in mid-January 1980, satellite photos confirmed those predictions.[10] McMoneagle says the military remote viewing program was ended partly due to stigma: "Everybody wanted to use it, but nobody wanted to be caught dead standing next to it. There’s an automatic ridicule factor. ‘Oh, yeah, psychics.’ Anybody associated with it could kiss their career goodbye."[11] Supporters of his claims include Charles Tart.[12]

According to author Paul H. Smith, McMoneagle predicted "several months" into the future,[13] and McMoneagle's own accounts provide differing claims of accuracy of his remote viewing, varying from 5 to 95 percent[14] to between 65 and 75 percent.[15] McMoneagle claims that remote viewing is not always accurate but that it was able to locate hostages and downed airplanes.[11] Of other psychics, he says that "Ninety-eight percent of the people are kooks."[11]

McMoneagle's future predictions include the passing of a teenager's "Right to Work" Bill,[16] a new religion without the emphasis of Christianity, a science of the soul,[17] a vaccine for AIDS,[18] a movement to eliminate television,[17] and a 'temporary tattoo' craze that would replace the wearing of clothing,[19] all of which were supposedly to take place between 2002 and 2006.

He reports that he worked with Dean Radin at the Conscious Research Laboratory, University of Nevada, Las Vegas to seek patentable ideas via remote viewing for a "future machine" Radin conceived.[20] McMoneagle also says he has worked on missing person cases in Washington, San Francisco, New York and Chicago.[11] as well as employing remote viewing as a time machine to make various observations such as the origin of the human species. According to McMoneagle, humans came from creatures somewhat like sea otters rather than primates and were created in a laboratory by creators who "seeded" the earth and then departed.[21]

Media appearances[edit]

Books[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Szegedy-Maszak, Marianne; Charles Fenyvesi (19 January 2003). "Enemies in the mind's eye". US News. Retrieved 2009-05-04. 
  2. ^ See complete text of Joseph McMoneagle's Legion of Merit and Certificate in Memoirs of a Psychic Spy: The Remarkable Life of U.S. Government Remote Viewer 001 by Joseph McMoneagle, Hampton Roads Publishing Co., 2002, 2006, pp 287-288, This book is an updated version of McMoneagle's The Stargate Chronicles, The first edition[self-published source?]
  3. ^ a b National Geographic program about Remote Viewing and McMoneagle, February 2005
  4. ^ Reading the Enemy's Mind: Inside Star Gate: America's Psychic Espionage Program By Paul H. Smith, Forge Books, 2004
  5. ^ Mind Trek: Exploring Consciousness, Time, and Space Through Remote Viewing by Joseph McMoneagle, Hampton Roads, Publishing Co., Inc., 1997[self-published source?]
  6. ^ "Looking into Higher Dimensions: Research with Joseph McMoneagle", Ronald Bryan 2007, p2
  7. ^ "Captain of My Ship, Master of My Soul", F. Holmes Atwater, p127 ISBN 1-57174-247-6.
  8. ^ http://www.manta.com/coms2/dnbcompany_g0vj5v Company listing for Intuitive Intelligence Applications
  9. ^ Memoirs of a Psychic Spy : The Remarkable Life of U.S. Government Remote Viewer 001 by Joseph McMoneagle, Hampton Roads Publishing Co., 2002, 2006, Revised and updated version of McMoneagles' The Stargate Chronicles, first edition
  10. ^ Memoirs of a Psychic Spy : The Remarkable Life of U.S. Government Remote Viewer 001 by Joseph McMoneagle, Hampton Roads Publishing Co., 2002, 2006, p. 123, Revised and updated version of McMoneagles' The Stargate Chronicles, first edition
  11. ^ a b c d Cote, John (5 January 2003). "PSYCHICS, OTHERS OFFER TO HELP POLICE IN SEARCH". The Modesto Bee. Retrieved 2009-05-04. 
  12. ^ The Ultimate Time Machine: A Remote Viewer's Perception of Time and Predictions for the New Millennium by Joseph McMoneagle, Foreword by Charles T. Tart, Hampton Roads Publishing Co., Inc., 1998
  13. ^ Reading the Enemy's Mind: Inside Star Gate America's Psychic Espionage Program by Paul H. Smith, Forge Books, 2005, pp. 128-129
  14. ^ Mind Trek: Exploring Consciousness, Time, and Space Through Remote Viewing by Joseph McMoneagle, Hampton Roads, Publishing Co., Inc., 1997, p 216
  15. ^ [1] Psychic World / Summer 1998
  16. ^ McMoneagle, The Ultimate Time Machine, p.173
  17. ^ a b McMoneagle, The Ultimate Time Machine, p.170
  18. ^ McMoneagle, The Ultimate Time Machine, p.244
  19. ^ McMoneagle, The Ultimate Time Machine, p.158
  20. ^ The Ultimate Time Machine: A Remote Viewer's Perception of Time and Predictions for the New Millennium by Joseph McMoneagle, Hampton Roads, Publishing Co., Inc., 1998, p.109
  21. ^ The Ultimate Time Machine: A Remote Viewer's Perception of Time and Predictions for the New Millennium by Joseph McMoneagle, Hampton Roads Publishing Co., Inc., 1998 p.93 & 94
  22. ^ Institute of Noetic Sciences | Consciousness | Science | Spirituality | Wisdom
  23. ^ remote viewing
  24. ^ Memoirs of a Psychic Spy: The Remarkable Life of U.S. Government Remote Viewer 001, Hampton Roads Publishing Co.,Inc, 2002, 2006, pages 230-236
  25. ^ The scientific edge, UNLV professor explores the link between mind and matter by Mary Manning, LAS VEGAS SUN, 14 Sep 1996, [http.//www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/archives/1996/sep/14/505088006.html]
  26. ^ Brian Dunning (2007-05-11). "The Truth About Remote Viewing: The psychic technique of remote viewing is consistent with simple, well known magic tricks. ". Skeptoid: Critical Analysis of Pop Phenomena. Retrieved 2011-11-09. 
  27. ^ Russell Targ - Remote Viewing - Psi - Psychic - Parapsychology Research and Information
  28. ^ Sullivan, Brian Ford. "USA to Air Banned Episode of 'Dead Zone'". The Futon Critic. Retrieved September 23, 2012. 
  29. ^ http://seriouskilowatt.com/archives/48.html Footage from Chounouryoku Sousakan 8
  30. ^ http://www.mceagle.com/remote-viewing/#media List of purported media appearances 2001-6

External links[edit]