Jonathan Grier

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Jonathan Grier
NationalityUnited States
FieldsComputer Science
Known forStochastic forensics
 
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Jonathan Grier
NationalityUnited States
FieldsComputer Science
Known forStochastic forensics

Jonathan Grier is a computer scientist, consultant, and entrepreneur. He is best known for his work on stochastic forensics and insider data theft.[1][2][3][4] He has also contributed to computer security, digital forensics, and software development.[1][4][5]

Grier is a frequent speaker at computer conferences such as Black Hat, ACSAC, and DFRWS.[6][7][8][9] His research has appeared in the Journal of Digital Investigation, SecurityFocus, Digital Forensics Magazine and InformationWeek.[1][2][5] His work has been cited by Microsoft Press, IBM Internet Security Systems, Hewlett-Packard, SC Magazine and the FBI National Infrastructure Protection Center.[4][10][11][12][13][14][15]

Grier is an advisor to private clients in computer security, software development and information technology,[4] and conducts training in computer security and forensics for private clients and the Department of Defense Cyber Crime Center.[16]

Research[edit]

In 2010, Grier introduced stochastic forensics as an alternative to traditional digital forensics which typically relies on digital artifacts.[2] Stochastic forensics' chief application is investigation of data theft, especially by insiders.[2] Grier was inspired by the statistical mechanics method used in physics.[5]

In 2001, Grier exposed several security flaws in a number of techniques then popular in Common Gateway Interface web applications.[11] This was a contributing factor in the move from flat file databases to modern database management systems.[17]

Other[edit]

Grier is a member of the Association of Orthodox Jewish Scientists, where he lectures on the intersection of Halakha with computer science and physics.[18]

In 1994, Yeshiva University named Grier a Yeshiva University Distinguished Scholar.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Grier, Jonathan (2011). "Detecting data theft using stochastic forensics". Journal of Digital Investigation. 8(Supplement), S71-S77.
  2. ^ a b c d Schwartz, Mathew J. (December 13, 2011)."How Digital Forensics Detects Insider Theft". InformationWeek.
  3. ^ Chickowski, Ericka (June 26, 2012). "New Forensics Method May Nab Insider Thieves". Dark Reading.
  4. ^ a b c d "Insider Threat Spotlight". (August 2012). SC Magazine
  5. ^ a b c Grier, Jonathan (May 2012). "Investigating Data Theft with Stochastic Forensics". "Digital Forensics Magazine."
  6. ^ Black Hat Briefings, USA 2012.Catching Insider Data Theft with Stochastic Forensics.
  7. ^ ACSAC,. ACSAC 2012 Program.
  8. ^ ACSAC, ACSAC 2011 Program.
  9. ^ DFRWS, DFRWS 2011 Agenda.
  10. ^ Howard, Michael and David LeBlanc (2001). Writing Secure Code. Microsoft Press
  11. ^ a b IBM Internet Security Systems (2001). Xforce Database.
  12. ^ Hewlett-Packard (2010-09-15). HP Security Bulletin. Accessed 2013-02-08.
  13. ^ FBI National Infrastructure Protection Center (2001). Cybernotes. Issue 2001-8.
  14. ^ FBI National Infrastructure Protection Center (2001). Cybernotes. Issue 2001-10.
  15. ^ FBI National Infrastructure Protection Center (2001). Cybernotes. Issue 2001-15.
  16. ^ Department of Defense Cyber Crime Center, 2012 DC3 Agenda.
  17. ^ SecurityWatch (July 12, 2001). Get Ready for the CGI updates!
  18. ^ Association of Orthodox Jewish Scientists, AOJS 2012 Summer Convention Program.