John Montefusco

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John Montefusco
Pitcher
Born: (1950-05-25) May 25, 1950 (age 63)
Long Branch, New Jersey
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
September 3, 1974 for the San Francisco Giants
Last MLB appearance
May 1, 1986 for the New York Yankees
Career statistics
Win–loss record90–83
Earned run average3.54
Strikeouts1,081
Teams
Career highlights and awards
 
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John Montefusco
Pitcher
Born: (1950-05-25) May 25, 1950 (age 63)
Long Branch, New Jersey
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
September 3, 1974 for the San Francisco Giants
Last MLB appearance
May 1, 1986 for the New York Yankees
Career statistics
Win–loss record90–83
Earned run average3.54
Strikeouts1,081
Teams
Career highlights and awards

John Joseph Montefusco Jr. (born May 25, 1950 in Long Branch, New Jersey) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher from 1974 to 1986 for the San Francisco Giants, Atlanta Braves, San Diego Padres, and New York Yankees. Named the National League Rookie of the Year in 1975, Montefusco's nickname was "The Count", a pun on his last name which sounds like Monte Cristo. In his 13 year career, his record was 90-83, with 1081 strikeouts, and a 3.54 ERA. He was a National League All-Star in 1976, winning a career high 16 games that year.

Before a game against the Los Angeles Dodgers on July 4, 1975, Montefusco guaranteed he would win the game. He proceeded to throw a shutout as the Giants defeated the Dodgers 1–0.[1]

On September 29, 1976, Montefusco threw a no-hitter for the Giants in a 9-0 victory versus the Atlanta Braves. It was the last no-hitter to be thrown by a Giant until Jonathan Sanchez threw one on July 10, 2009. [1] He also is one of only a handful of pitchers to hit a home run in his first at bat (September 3, 1974).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Haft, Chris and Cash Kruth (August 10, 2010). "Montefusco familiar with guaranteeing wins". Giants.MLB.com. Major League Baseball. Retrieved August 12, 2012. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
John Candelaria
No-hitter pitcher
September 29, 1976
Succeeded by
Jim Colborn