John Davidson (ice hockey)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

John Davidson
Born(1953-02-27) February 27, 1953 (age 61)
Ottawa, ON, CAN
Height6 ft 3 in (191 cm)
Weight205 lb (93 kg; 14 st 9 lb)
PositionGoaltender
CaughtLeft
Played forNew York Rangers (NHL)
Springfield Indians (AHL)
New Haven Nighthawks (AHL)
St. Louis Blues (NHL)
Denver Spurs (CHL)
NHL Draft5th overall, 1973
St. Louis Blues
Playing career1973–1983
 
  (Redirected from John Davidson (hockey player))
Jump to: navigation, search
For other people named John Davidson, see John Davidson (disambiguation).
John Davidson
Born(1953-02-27) February 27, 1953 (age 61)
Ottawa, ON, CAN
Height6 ft 3 in (191 cm)
Weight205 lb (93 kg; 14 st 9 lb)
PositionGoaltender
CaughtLeft
Played forNew York Rangers (NHL)
Springfield Indians (AHL)
New Haven Nighthawks (AHL)
St. Louis Blues (NHL)
Denver Spurs (CHL)
NHL Draft5th overall, 1973
St. Louis Blues
Playing career1973–1983

John Davidson (born February 27, 1953 in Ottawa, Ontario), is the president of hockey operations of the Columbus Blue Jackets and a former goaltender for the St. Louis Blues (1973–75) and New York Rangers (1975–83) of the National Hockey League. He is also well known as a long-time hockey broadcaster. On June 4, 2009, it was announced that Davidson would be honored by the Hockey Hall of Fame with the 2009 Foster Hewitt Memorial Award for his contributions to broadcasting.[1]

Biography[edit]

Playing career[edit]

Growing up in western Canada, he played his minor hockey in Calgary, Alberta. He was drafted fifth overall in 1973, and became the first goalie in NHL history to jump directly from major junior to the NHL. While his hockey career was fraught with many significant injuries, he is perhaps best remembered (as a player) for leading the Rangers to the 1979 Stanley Cup Finals on an injured left knee. His jersey numbers were 35, 00 and 30.[2] Davidson was the first, and one of only two, NHL players to wear the number 00; after Martin Biron briefly wore the number in 1995, the league banned the use of the number.

Davidson was accidentally the inspiration for the title song of the 1978 hit album Double Vision by the rock group Foreigner. Members of the band were watching a Stanley Cup Playoff game between Davidson's New York Rangers and the Buffalo Sabres. Members of the band were fans of the Rangers. Davidson was shaken up when an unknown member of the Sabres took a hard shot that hit Davidson's goalie mask. As he was recovering, announcers Jim Gordon and Bill Chadwick said Davidson was suffering from "Double Vision."[3][4]

Broadcasting career[edit]

After retiring due to injury, he joined MSG's hockey coverage staff in 1983, and was the color commentator for Rangers games from 1986–87 to 2005–06. Davidson, often known by the nickname "J.D.", became one of the most prominent color commentators in the sport, and his hockey insight is so well respected that he currently sits on the Hockey Hall of Fame selection committee. Long-time network TV partner Mike Emrick also sits on that committee, and the two shared the 2004 Lester Patrick Trophy for service to hockey in the U.S.[5]

Davidson (like his former MSG Network booth-mates Sam Rosen and Al Trautwig) has also contributed to NHL coverage on various national television networks (including CBC, Fox, ABC, ESPN, NBC and Versus when it was the American version of the Outdoor Life Network (OLN)). The following timeline is a list of all season-long hockey coverage he has done, such as in-game commentary and post-game analysis shows. It does not include special events such as the Winter Olympics or Canada Cup. Davidson was known as a broadcaster for his signature phrase of "Oh baby!" He was also featured in full motion videos shot for the EA Sports video game NHL 97.

Davidson co-authored the book Hockey for Dummies with sportswriter John Steinbreder.

Management career[edit]

Davidson was named President of Hockey Operations for the Blues on June 30, 2006. He left the Blues after agreeing to a buyout of his contract on October 9, 2012.[6] He was then named President of Hockey Operations for the Columbus Blue Jackets on October 24, 2012.[7]

Achievements[edit]

Playing[edit]

Broadcasting[edit]

Career statistics[edit]

  
SeasonTeamLeagueGPWLTMINGASOGAA
1969–70Calgary CentennialsWCHL10003000.00
1970–71Lethbridge Sugar KingsAJHL46376014233.09
1971–72Calgary CentennialsWCHL66397015782.37
1971–72Edmonton Oil KingsWCHL2020118904.58
1972–73Calgary CentennialsWCHL63373520123.30
1973–74St. Louis BluesNHL3913197230011803.08
1974–75St. Louis BluesNHL4017157236014403.66
1974–75Denver SpursCHL74214202703.86
1975–76New York RangersNHL5622285320721233.97
1976–77New York RangersNHL3914146211612513.54
1976–77New Haven NighthawksAHL2119502.52
1977–78New York RangersNHL341413418489813.18
1978–79New York RangersNHL3920125223213103.52
1979–80New York RangersNHL4120154230612223.17
1979–80New Haven NighthawksAHL41302381604.02
1980–81New York RangersNHL101715604805.14
1981–82New York RangersNHL110060101.00
1982-83Springfield IndiansAHL83404372403.30
1982–83New York RangersNHL2110120502.50
NHL totals3011231243917109100473.52
Minor league totals19911800581132.95

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kreiser, John (June 4, 2009). "Davidson Overwhelmed to be Hall-of-Famer". NHL.com. Retrieved 2009-07-31. 
  2. ^ "John Davidson". All Time Roster. New York Rangers. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  3. ^ John Halligan NY Rangers Website
  4. ^ John Halligan Blueshirt Bulletin February 2008 issue
  5. ^ "Lester Patrick Trophy". National Hockey League. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  6. ^ http://kstp.com/sports/stories/S2794546.shtml?cat=7
  7. ^ http://bluejacketsxtra.dispatch.com/content/stories/2012/10/25/hes-hired-to-win.html

External links[edit]