Joe Gilliam

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Joe Gilliam
No. 17
Quarterback
Personal information
Date of birth: (1950-12-29)December 29, 1950
Place of birth: Charleston, West Virginia, U.S.
Date of death: December 25, 2000(2000-12-25) (aged 49)
Place of death: Nashville, Tennessee, U.S.
Career information
College: Tennessee State
NFL Draft: 1972 / Round: 11 / Pick: 273
Debuted in 1972
Last played in 1983
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
TD-INT9-17
Yards2,103
QB Rating53.2
Stats at NFL.com
 
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Joe Gilliam
No. 17
Quarterback
Personal information
Date of birth: (1950-12-29)December 29, 1950
Place of birth: Charleston, West Virginia, U.S.
Date of death: December 25, 2000(2000-12-25) (aged 49)
Place of death: Nashville, Tennessee, U.S.
Career information
College: Tennessee State
NFL Draft: 1972 / Round: 11 / Pick: 273
Debuted in 1972
Last played in 1983
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
TD-INT9-17
Yards2,103
QB Rating53.2
Stats at NFL.com

Joseph Gilliam, Jr. (December 29, 1950 – December 25, 2000) was an American football player.

Contents

Biography

Joe Gilliam was born in Charleston, West Virginia, and was the third of four children of Ruth and Joe Gilliam, Sr.

Gilliam grew up on the campus of Tennessee A&I State University (renamed Tennessee State University in 1968). His father was a defensive coordinator at TSU.

The younger Gilliam displayed his own athletic abilities at a young age, beginning at Nashville’s Washington Junior high School, where he participated in tumbling, track, and basketball. In 1966, he became the starting quarterback at Pearl High School and led the squad when they played in the city’s first season of integrated football. Gilliam kept close to the Tiger football team by serving as a ball boy.[1]

Gilliam Jr.'s daughter Is R&B Singer Joi. His ex son-in-law is rapper Big Gipp of the Goodie Mob.

Career

Gilliam was drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1972 in the 11th round after a college football career at Tennessee State University where he was a two-time All-American. He became the Steelers' starting quarterback in 1974 but lost the job when Terry Bradshaw was chosen to lead the team after the first six games of the season. Gilliam was out of the National Football League at the end of 1975. He battled cocaine and alcohol addiction on and off over the next few years, and even ended up living in a cardboard box under a bridge for two years.

In 1981 Gilliam returned to football, playing quarterback for the semi-pro New Orleans Blue Knights of the Dixie Football League. In 1983, Gilliam attempted a comeback to pro football in the United States Football League with the Washington Federals. He did not have much success and retired from the sport for good after that season. In 1986, Joe Gilliam was inducted into the American Football Association's Semi Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Gilliam ran a football camp in Nashville at times. He earned the nickname "Jefferson Street Joe" for the boulevard that runs by Tennessee State University in Nashville.[2]

On December 25, 2000, Gilliam died of a heart attack shortly after watching an NFL game between the Dallas Cowboys and Tennessee Titans. He had been sober for four years prior to his death and was able to attend the final Steelers game at Three Rivers Stadium.

References

  1. ^ [1] , Joe Gilliam Jr. Had athletic leadership skills, The African American Registry. Last Accessed September 27, 2007

External links