Jeremiah Peabody's Polyunsaturated Quick-Dissolving Fast-Acting Pleasant-Tasting Green and Purple Pills

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"Jeremiah Peabody's Polyunsaturated Quick-Dissolving Fast-Acting Pleasant-Tasting Green and Purple Pills"
Single by Ray Stevens
from the album 1,837 Seconds of Humor
B-sideTeen Years
ReleasedJuly 1961
Recorded1961
GenrePop, Novelty
Length2:26
LabelMercury Records
Writer(s)Ray Stevens
Producer(s)Shelby Singleton
Ray Stevens singles chronology
"Happy Blue Year"
(1960)
"Jeremiah Peabody's Polyunsaturated Quick-Dissolving Fast-Acting Pleasant-Tasting Green and Purple Pills"
(1961)
"Scratch My Back (I Love It)"
(1961)
 
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"Jeremiah Peabody's Polyunsaturated Quick-Dissolving Fast-Acting Pleasant-Tasting Green and Purple Pills"
Single by Ray Stevens
from the album 1,837 Seconds of Humor
B-sideTeen Years
ReleasedJuly 1961
Recorded1961
GenrePop, Novelty
Length2:26
LabelMercury Records
Writer(s)Ray Stevens
Producer(s)Shelby Singleton
Ray Stevens singles chronology
"Happy Blue Year"
(1960)
"Jeremiah Peabody's Polyunsaturated Quick-Dissolving Fast-Acting Pleasant-Tasting Green and Purple Pills"
(1961)
"Scratch My Back (I Love It)"
(1961)

"Jeremiah Peabody's Polyunsaturated Quick-Dissolving Fast-Acting Pleasant-Tasting Green and Purple Pills" is a novelty song written and performed by Ray Stevens. It was released as a single in 1961 and became Stevens' first Hot 100 single, peaking at #35 in September.[1] Its lyrics tell of a fictional "wonder drug" that, when taken in a daily dose, can cure a myriad of ailments.

The song is also notable for having the second-longest title (104 characters) of any single on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, the longest being the Stars on 45 debut single. The song seems to be referenced by the rap group D12 in the song Purple Pills.[2]

Chart run[edit]

Billboard Hot 100[3] (6 weeks, entered August 21): Reached #35

Cashbox[4] (8 weeks, entered August 19): 99, 81, 69, 59, 52, 42, 38, 61

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1992). Fred Weiler, ed. The Billboard Book of USA Top 40 Hits (5 ed.). Guinness. p. 438. 
  2. ^ Box Talent Agency
  3. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1997). Joel Whitburn's Top Pop Singles. Menomonee Falls, WI: Record Research Inc. p. 584. ISBN 0-89820-122-5. 
  4. ^ Hoffmann, Frank (1983). The Cash Box Singles Charts, 1950-1981. Metuchen, NJ & London: The Scarecrow Press, Inc. p. 568.