Jeppesen

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Jeppesen Sanderson, Inc.
TypeSubsidiary
IndustryInformation management, aerospace, logistics, optimization
Founded1934
FoundersElrey Borge Jeppesen
HeadquartersInverness, Colorado, U.S.
ProductsNavigational information, operations planning tools, flight planning products, software
Employees3,200
ParentThe Boeing Company
Websitehttp://www.jeppesen.com
 
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For other uses, see Jeppesen (disambiguation).
Jeppesen Sanderson, Inc.
TypeSubsidiary
IndustryInformation management, aerospace, logistics, optimization
Founded1934
FoundersElrey Borge Jeppesen
HeadquartersInverness, Colorado, U.S.
ProductsNavigational information, operations planning tools, flight planning products, software
Employees3,200
ParentThe Boeing Company
Websitehttp://www.jeppesen.com

Jeppesen (also known as Jeppesen Sanderson) is an American company that specializes in navigational information, operations management and optimization solutions, crew and fleet management solutions and flight training products and services. Jeppesen serves four market segments (Commercial Aviation, Business Aviation, Military, and General Aviation). Airlines and private pilots, airline operations centers, military teams, ship operators and boaters, as well as railway companies use Jeppesen charts, data, and operations management tools. The company is a subsidiary of The Boeing Company. Jeppesen also publishes related software, some of which is used on its electronic flight bag and in others offered by avionics manufacturers and other third parties.

Jeppesen is headquartered in Inverness, Colorado,[1] an unincorporated area of Arapahoe County, with offices around the world, including Neu-Isenburg (Germany), Massa (Italy), Crawley (United Kingdom), Gothenburg (Sweden), Canberra (Australia) and Gdańsk (Poland). The company employs approximately 3,200 people.[2]

In the navigation space, which is where Jeppesen started, Jeppesen's charts are often called "Jepp charts" or simply "Jepps" by pilots, due to the charts' de facto popularity. This popularity extends to electronic charts, which are increasingly favored over paper charts by pilots and mariners as mobile computing devices, electronic flight bags, integrated electronic bridge systems and other display devices become more common and readily available.

History[edit]

The company was founded in 1934 by Elrey Borge Jeppesen, a pilot working for Varney Air Lines, who was the first to make aeronautical charts for pilots to navigate in flight. The information the he collected and the charts that he drew were at first only for personal use, but fellow pilots quickly saw the benefits of using these charts and Jeppesen started selling copies of his chart book for $10. Other pilots started to collect data on their own routes and handing this to Jeppesen for him to include in his navigation book.[3]

United Airlines, the airline for which Jeppesen worked in the late 1930s after Varney Air Lines had merged with several other companies to form United Airlines, was one of the first airlines to start using Jeppesen's charts. After a while the chart business started taking up so much of Jeppesen's time that he quit his job as a Captain and focused his energy on making charts.[4]

The terminal at then-under-construction Denver International Airport was named in honor of Jeppesen founder Elrey Borge Jeppesen in February 1991.

1940s
In 1941, Jeppesen moved the company from Salt Lake City, Utah, to Denver, Colorado.[5]

In 1947, Jeppesen and the CAA collaborated to introduce standard instrument approach procedures and to establish the National Flight Data Center.[6]

1957, Jeppesen expanded to Europe by opening an office in Frankfurt, Germany to provide services to customers in Europe and beyond.

1961, The company was purchased by the Times-Mirror Company (parent company of the Los Angeles Times).[7]

1970s
In 1973, Jeppesen NavData® was first used commercially in flight management computer guidance systems (FMCGS).

In 1974, Jeppesen entered the flight training business when Times-Mirror merged it with Sanderson Films.[5]

1980s
Jeppesen began a series of acquisitions that added to its product and service offerings:

In 1989, Jeppesen purchased Lockheed DataPlan, a flight planning and weather services company. Jeppesen's current chief executive officer, Mark Van Tine, formerly worked for this company.[8]

1990s
Between 1990 and 1995, Jeppesen expanded globally by opening offices in Australia and China to serve customers in the Asia-Pacific region, and continued to expand through acquisition by purchasing TannGuide, which became the JeppGuide airport directory; APU, which became part of OpsData; and International Aviation Publishers, which created aviation maintenance training manuals;[6]

In 1996, Jeppesen introduced JeppView, which provided a complete, worldwide library of terminal aeronautical charts on CD-ROM;

In 1996, Jeppesen acquired MentorPlus, a maker of PC-based aviation and marine moving map and flight planning applications;[6]

In 1998 Jeppesen introduced Internet-based delivery of NavData updates.

2000s
In 2000, Jeppesen purchased Nobeltec, Inc., a Portland, Oregon-based company that provides marine navigation software and charts;[6]

In 2000, Jeppesen was acquired by The Boeing Company. Boeing bought Jeppesen from the Tribune Company, which had acquired Times-Mirror and was selling off its non-core assets;[6][9]

In 2002, Jeppesen's first commercial electronic flight bag and Internet-based chart delivery were introduced;[6]

In 2003, Jeppesen became the first commercial organization to be certified by the Federal Aviation Administration as a Qualified Internet Communications Provider (QICP);[6]

In 2004, Jeppesen acquired SBS International, a New York City-based provider of crew scheduling services. Jeppesen acquired SBS through an arrangement with Boeing, which had purchased SBS in 2001;[6]

In 2006, Jeppesen purchased Carmen Systems, a provider of crew scheduling and disruption management software. The company was headquartered in Gothenburg, Sweden, and had some 300 employees.[10] Jeppesen quickly consolidated Carmen and SBS product offerings and locations;

In 2007, Jeppesen purchased C-MAP, a provider of digital maritime cartography, data services and other navigational information. C-MAP became part of Jeppesen's marine division. It has operations in Italy, the United Kingdom, Norway, Greece, Poland, Russia, India, Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Malaysia, Australia and the United States;[11]

In 2008 Jeppesen purchased Ocean Systems, Inc., an Alameda, California-based provider of vessel and voyage optimization solutions for commercial marine operations;[6]

In 2008 Jeppesen received FAA approval for its Airport Moving Map application for Class 2 electronic flight bags;[6]

In 2009 Jeppesen received FAA approval to design and validate required navigation performance (RNP) procedures in the United States;[6]

In 2009 Jeppesen sold its Nobeltec product line to Signet USA.[6]

2010s
In 2010, Jeppesen received approval from the Civil Aviation Safety Authority of Australia to design, validate and maintain both required navigation performance and conventional instrument approach procedures;[6]

In 2010, Jeppesen was named the 2010 INFORMS Prize winner for its organization-wide use of operations research.[6]

In 2012, Jeppesen-designed arrival procedures are rolled out for Denver International Airport. [6]

In 2013, Jeppesen introduces Mobile FlightDeck VFR for general aviation pilots.[6]

In 2013, Jeppesen concludes sale of journey planning business to SilverRail Technologies.[6]

In 2014, Jeppesen rolls out FlightDeck Pro for Windows 8.[6]

Alleged involvement with CIA extraordinary rendition flights[edit]

On October 23, 2006, the New Yorker reported that Jeppesen handled the logistical planning for the CIA's extraordinary rendition flights. The allegation is based on information from an ex-employee who quoted Bob Overby, managing director of the company as saying "We do all of the extraordinary rendition flights — you know, the torture flights. Let's face it, some of these flights end up that way. It certainly pays well." The article went on to suggest that this may make Jeppesen a potential defendant in a lawsuit by Khalid El-Masri.[12] Jeppesen was named as a defendant in a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) on May 30, 2007, on behalf of several other individuals who were allegedly subject to extraordinary rendition. The suit was dismissed in February, 2008 on a motion from the United States government, on theory that proceeding with the case would reveal state secrets and endanger relations with other nations that had cooperated.[13]

On May 16, 2011, the Supreme Court declined to review the decision of the Ninth Circuit to dismiss the case.[14]

Other flight support providers[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jeppesen: About Us. Retrieved 2010-02-04. The postal designation of Englewood, a city located some seven miles west, is used in the company’s mailing address.
  2. ^ Jeppesen: About Us: Today. Retrieved 2007-11-28.
  3. ^ Robert Goyer, The Chart Is Dead, Flying, September 2011, p. 8
  4. ^ Flying
  5. ^ a b Jeppesen: About Us: Background. Retrieved 2007-11-28
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Jeppesen: About Us: Timeline. Retrieved 2007-11-28
  7. ^ McDougal, Dennis (2001). Privileged Son: Otis Chandler and the Rise and Fall of the L.A. Times Dynasty. Da Capo Press. p. 231. 
  8. ^ Jeppesen: About Us: Management Biographies. Retrieved 2007-11-28
  9. ^ " . . the folks who run the company (which is owned in a supportive and smartly hands-off way by Boeing) call themselves a data company."Flying
  10. ^ Boeing to Acquire Carmen Systems. Boeing News Release. March 3, 2006
  11. ^ Boeing Concludes Purchase of C-Map to Grow Jeppesen Marine Business. Boeing News Release. January 30, 2007
  12. ^ The C.I.A.'s Travel Agent, Jane Mayer, The New Yorker, 2006-10-23.
  13. ^ "ACLU lawsuit against Jeppesen dismissed". Rocky Mountain News. February 14, 2008. Retrieved 2010-02-04. 
  14. ^ Order List 563 U.S., May 16, 2011, retrieved May 18, 2011 

External links[edit]