Jeffrey M. Schwartz

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Jeffrey M. Schwartz
M.D.
Jeffrey-m-schwartz.jpg
OccupationPsychiatrist
EmployerUCLA School of Medicine
Website
www.jeffreymschwartz.com
 
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For the American anthropologist, see Jeffrey H. Schwartz.
Jeffrey M. Schwartz
M.D.
Jeffrey-m-schwartz.jpg
OccupationPsychiatrist
EmployerUCLA School of Medicine
Website
www.jeffreymschwartz.com

Jeffrey M. Schwartz, M.D. is an American psychiatrist and researcher in the field of neuroplasticity and its application to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).[1][2] He is a proponent of mind/body dualism and appeared in the 2008 Film Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed, in which he told interviewer Ben Stein that science should not be separated from religion.[2][3][4][5]

Brain lock[edit]

Brain lock is a term coined by Schwartz to describe obsessive-compulsive behavior and to describe a treatment plan he published in his 1997 book Brain Lock: Free Yourself from Obsessive-Compulsive Behavior.[6][7] In the book Schwartz claims that obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) are a result of a bio-chemical imbalance where brain functions will get "locked" in an obsessive-compulsive pattern and that OCD can be self-treated by following four steps,[8] which are listed as follows:[9]

  1. Relabel the obsessive thoughts and compulsive urges as obsessions and compulsions, not as real thoughts.
  2. Reattribute the obsessive thoughts to a brain malfunction called OCD.
  3. Refocus on a wholesome, productive activity for at least fifteen minutes.
  4. Revalue the entire obsession and compulsion group as having no useful meaning in your life.

Publications[edit]

Books[edit]

Articles[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Malcolm, Lynne. "Part 1 of 2: The Power of Plasticity". ABC.net.au. Retrieved 30 August 2014. 
  2. ^ a b 4th Annual Discovery Society Insiders Briefing on Intelligent Design
  3. ^ Gefter, Amanda (22 October 2008), "Creationists declare war over the brain", New Scientist (2679): 46–47 
  4. ^ Beauregard, Mario (26 November 2008), nonmaterialist-mind.html "Non-materialist mind", New Scientist (2684): 23 
  5. ^ A Scientific Dissent from Darwinism
  6. ^ Austin, Michael (2011). Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature. University of Nebraska Press. pp. 50–51. ISBN 9780803232976. Retrieved 30 August 2014. 
  7. ^ Chansky, Tamar E. (2001). Freeing Your Child from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Random House LLC. pp. 7, 28, 39, 181, 190. ISBN 0812931173. Retrieved 30 August 2014. 
  8. ^ Slaughter, Adele. "Shalhoub brings obsessive compulsive disorder to light". USA Today. Retrieved 30 August 2014. 
  9. ^ Olson, Tom (June 2003). "Buddhism, Behavior Change, and OCD". Journal of Holistic Nursing 21 (2): 151–162. doi:10.1177/0898010103021002005. Retrieved 30 August 2014. 
  10. ^ Volk, Steve. "Rewiring the Brain to Treat OCD". Discover Magazine. Retrieved 30 August 2014. 

External links[edit]