James Coney Island

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James Coney Island, Inc.
TypePrivate
IndustryFast food
Founded1923
Founder(s)James Papadakis
Tom Papadakis
HeadquartersHouston, Texas, United States
Number of locations21[1]
Key peopleDarrin Straughan (President)
ProductsHot dogs (Coney Island hot dogs), Hamburgers, French fries, Milkshakes, Soft drinks
WebsiteJamesconeyisland.com
 
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James Coney Island, Inc.
TypePrivate
IndustryFast food
Founded1923
Founder(s)James Papadakis
Tom Papadakis
HeadquartersHouston, Texas, United States
Number of locations21[1]
Key peopleDarrin Straughan (President)
ProductsHot dogs (Coney Island hot dogs), Hamburgers, French fries, Milkshakes, Soft drinks
WebsiteJamesconeyisland.com

James Coney Island, Inc. is a chain of fast food restaurants that specializes in Coney Island hot dogs. It has its headquarters, the James Coney Island Support Center, located in Suite 700 in the 11111 Katy Freeway building in Houston.[2]

History[edit]

The company was founded in 1923 by two Greek immigrant brothers, James and Tom Papadakis;[3] the former being the company's namesake.[4][5] The original James Coney Island restaurant was one of the first major hot dog vendors in Houston.

James Coney Island Shepherd in Houston

The business was family-owned and operated from its inception until 1990, when it was sold to private investors.[6][7]

The location in Downtown Houston opened in 1975. In 2010 the chain announced that the location was closing after a dispute with the landlord of 815 Dallas, the building housing the location.[8] The chain previously had a location in Downtown at 1011 Walker,[9] which served as the number one location of the chain. The 1011 Walker location opened in 1923; previously the restaurant was located in a smaller facility on Rusk Street. The chain's number two location opened in the Town & Country Mall area in 1968. In 1993 1011 Walker closed after the restaurant management discovered that the building required repairs that were not cost effective.[10]

See also[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ DeMers, John (January 24, 2012). "The New/Old Original James Coney Island". Delicious Mischief. Retrieved August 16, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Privacy Policy." James Coney Island. Retrieved on April 4, 2010.
  3. ^ Colley, Jenna (May 28, 2000). "The new dog in town". Austin Business Journal. Retrieved August 16, 2013. 
  4. ^ Karkabi, Barbara (2003-07-04). "Dig in to hot dogs/Area eateries offer up both classics and some creative concoctions". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  5. ^ Powers, Ted (December 15, 2011). "Dining Out: James Coney Island". Jewish Herald-Voice. Retrieved August 16, 2013. 
  6. ^ Kaplan, David (2009-02-22). "A name loaded with local flavor James Coney Island's newest location capitalizes on the iconic downtown original, a hot spot for hot dogs and Houston color JAMES: More locations are in the works". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  7. ^ Ruggless, Ron (July 12, 2013). "James Coney Island plans brand refresh". Nation's Restaurant News. Retrieved August 16, 2013. 
  8. ^ Hatcher, Monica. "Dog gone! James Coney Island leaves downtown." Houston Chronicle. October 30, 2010. Retrieved on October 30, 2010.
  9. ^ Walsh, Robb (July 18, 2002). "Dog Days". Houston Press. Retrieved August 16, 2013. 
  10. ^ Gonzales, J. R. "Memories of James Coney Island at 1011 Walker and a special deal." Houston Chronicle. August 16, 2012. Retrieved on August 20, 2012.

External links[edit]