Jaguar X-Type

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Jaguar X-Type
2004-2006 Jaguar X-Type (X400) SE sedan (2011-06-15) 01.jpg
Overview
ManufacturerJaguar Cars
Production2001–2009
AssemblyHalewood, England
DesignerIan Callum (estate)
Wayne Burgess (saloon)
Body and chassis
ClassCompact executive car
Body style4-door saloon
5-door estate
LayoutTransverse Front engine, front-wheel drive / all-wheel drive
PlatformFord CD132 platform
RelatedFord Mondeo
Powertrain
Enginepetrol
2.1 V6
2.5 V6
3.0 V6
diesel
2.0 I4
2.2 I4
Transmission5-speed automatic
6-speed automatic
5-speed manual
6-speed manual
Dimensions
Wheelbase106.7 in (2,710 mm)
LengthSaloon: 4,672 mm (183.9 in)
2001–2008 Estate: 185.5 in (4,710 mm)
2009– Saloon: 4,716 mm (185.7 in)
WidthBodywork: 70.4 in (1,790 mm)
2001–2008 Overall: 78.8 in (2,000 mm)
2009– Overall: 2,000 mm (78.7 in)
Height2009– Saloon: 54.8 in (1,390 mm)
Estate: 58.4 in (1,480 mm)
2009– Saloon: 1,430 mm (56.3 in)
Chronology
SuccessorJaguar XE
 
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Jaguar X-Type
2004-2006 Jaguar X-Type (X400) SE sedan (2011-06-15) 01.jpg
Overview
ManufacturerJaguar Cars
Production2001–2009
AssemblyHalewood, England
DesignerIan Callum (estate)
Wayne Burgess (saloon)
Body and chassis
ClassCompact executive car
Body style4-door saloon
5-door estate
LayoutTransverse Front engine, front-wheel drive / all-wheel drive
PlatformFord CD132 platform
RelatedFord Mondeo
Powertrain
Enginepetrol
2.1 V6
2.5 V6
3.0 V6
diesel
2.0 I4
2.2 I4
Transmission5-speed automatic
6-speed automatic
5-speed manual
6-speed manual
Dimensions
Wheelbase106.7 in (2,710 mm)
LengthSaloon: 4,672 mm (183.9 in)
2001–2008 Estate: 185.5 in (4,710 mm)
2009– Saloon: 4,716 mm (185.7 in)
WidthBodywork: 70.4 in (1,790 mm)
2001–2008 Overall: 78.8 in (2,000 mm)
2009– Overall: 2,000 mm (78.7 in)
Height2009– Saloon: 54.8 in (1,390 mm)
Estate: 58.4 in (1,480 mm)
2009– Saloon: 1,430 mm (56.3 in)
Chronology
SuccessorJaguar XE

The Jaguar X-Type (codename: X400) is a compact executive car that was produced from 2001 to 2009 by Jaguar Cars. The smallest of the Jaguar model range, the X-Type was marketed in saloon and estate variants, and was the first estate manufactured in series production by the company. The X-Type was manufactured at the Halewood Assembly Facility near Liverpool.[1]

Description[edit]

The Jaguar X-Type, codenamed X400,[2] was launched in October 2001. It was Jaguar's first compact executive car since the Jaguar Mark 1 of 1955. The X-Type was one of the last to be styled under the supervision of Geoff Lawson, with Wayne Burgess as principal designer.[3]

The four-door saloon was launched in 2001 and in 2004 the five-door estate joined the range. Production of both versions ended in 2009.[4] The estate was officially known as the "Sportwagon” in the United States. It was the first Jaguar model designed by Ian Callum.

Initially, the X-Type was only available with all-wheel-drive and either a 2.5 litre or 3.0 litre V6 petrol engine. In 2002, an entry-level 2.1 litre V6 front-wheel-drive model was added. All three engines were available with either five-speed automatic or five-speed manual transmissions. The X-Type grille was slightly modified for both the 2004 and 2006 model years.

Facelift[edit]

Jaguar X-Type estate (2008 facelift)

The X-Type facelift was unveiled at the 2007 Canary Wharf Motorexpo.[5] The revised X-Type went on sale internationally during 2008, with UK sales from March.[6] The revised X-Type included redesigned front and rear bumpers and new door mirrors with integrated turn indicator repeaters creating an overall look that echoed the 2008 Jaguar XF. New engine choices included a 2.2-litre diesel with particulate filter and a new six-speed automatic transmission and Jaguar Sequential Shift, in addition to the existing 2.0-litre diesel, and two V6 petrol engines; 2.5 and 3.0-litre. In some European markets, the petrol engines were withdrawn for sale.

The facelifted model was expected to continue through to the 2010 model year in its remaining markets, and not to be directly replaced. On 15 July 2009, Jaguar Land Rover announced that it would end production of the X-Type by late 2009, with the loss of 300 jobs, and have a three-week shut down, at their plant in Halewood where the car was built, between September and December.[1][7][8] By this time more than 350,000 had been produced.[1]

Special editions[edit]

In 2004, the Spirit limited model based on the 2.5-litre V6 featured the 'Sports Collection' pack with new spoilers and rear valance.[9] It was followed in 2005 by the XS limited edition, which continued the sports theme, but available with a wider range of engines.[10]

Technical[edit]

The X-Type was lightly based on a modified version of the Ford CD132 platform. The X-Type shares about 15 to 20% of the Ford Mondeo design. The X-Type was initially offered as all-wheel drive only and mated to a 2.5 litre and 3.0 litre AJ-V6 petrol engine.

The Jaguar AJ-V6 engine design is unique to the Jaguar X-Type; one notable addition is the use of variable valve timing. The X-Type's petrol engine is also set apart by the use of SFI fuel injection, four valves per cylinder and features fracture-split forged powder metal connecting rods plus a one-piece cast camshaft and has direct-acting mechanical bucket (DAMB) tappets.

In 2003, the X-Type was also offered in front-wheel drive with the introduction of Jaguar’s first four-cylinder diesel engines (based on the Ford Duratorq ZSD unit from the Mondeo and Transit), and with the smaller 2.1 litre petrol V6. The six-speed automatic transmission supplied on the later 2.2-litre diesel models includes Jaguar Sequential Shift.

Engines[edit]

ModelYearsDisplacementBore x StrokePowerTorqueTransmission
2.1-litre V6 petrol2003–20072,099 cc (128.1 cu in) V681.65 mm × 66.84 mm (3.21 in × 2.63 in)157 PS (115 kW; 155 hp)201 N·m (148 lbf·ft)5-speed manual
2.1-litre V6 petrol2008–20092,099 cc (128.1 cu in) V681.65 mm × 66.84 mm (3.21 in × 2.63 in)156 PS (115 kW; 154 hp) @ 6,800196 N·m (145 lbf·ft) @ 4,1005-speed manual, 5-speed automatic
2.5-litre V6 petrol2001–20092,495 cc (152.3 cu in) V681.6 mm × 79.5 mm (3.21 in × 3.13 in)194 PS (143 kW; 191 hp) @ 6,800244 N·m (180 lbf·ft) @ 3,0005-speed manual, 5-speed automatic
3.0-litre V6 petrol2001–20092,967 cc (181.1 cu in) V689.0 mm × 79.5 mm (3.50 in × 3.13 in)231 PS (170 kW; 228 hp) @ 6,800279.3 N·m (206 lbf·ft) @ 3,0005-speed manual, 5-speed automatic
2.0-litre diesel2003–20071,998 cc (121.9 cu in) I486 mm × 86 mm (3.4 in × 3.4 in)128 PS (94 kW; 126 hp) @ 3,800331 N·m (244 lbf·ft) @ 1,8005-speed manual
2.0-litre diesel[11]2008-20091,998 cc (121.9 cu in) I486 mm × 86 mm (3.4 in × 3.4 in)130 PS (96 kW; 128 hp) @ 3,800330 N·m (240 lbf·ft) @ 1,8005-speed manual
2.2-litre diesel[12]2003–20072,198 cc (134.1 cu in) I486 mm × 94.6 mm (3.39 in × 3.72 in)152 PS (112 kW; 150 hp) @ 3,500366 N·m (270 lbf·ft) @ 1,8006-speed manual
2.2-litre diesel2008-20092,198 cc (134.1 cu in) I486 mm × 94.6 mm (3.39 in × 3.72 in)155 PS (114 kW; 153 hp) @ 3,500360 N·m (270 lbf·ft) @ 1,8006-speed manual
2.2-litre diesel DPF2008–20092,198 cc (134.1 cu in) I486 mm × 94.6 mm (3.39 in × 3.72 in)145 PS (107 kW; 143 hp) @ 3,500360 N·m (270 lbf·ft) @ 1,8006-speed manual, 6-speed automatic

Safety[edit]

Euro NCAP 2002 X-Type[13]PointsRating
Adult Occupant:26 out of 364/5 stars
Child Occupant:__ out of 49
Pedestrian Impact:2 out of 361/4 stars
ANCAP 2010 X-Type[14]PointsRating
Overall Score:26.40 out of 374/5 stars
Offset Impact:10.40 out of 16
Side Impact:14.10 out of 16
Pole Impact:2 out of 2
Bonus Points:0 out of 3
NHTSA 2004 X-Type[15]Rating
Frontal Driver:4/5 stars
Frontal Passenger:4/5 stars
Side Driver:4/5 stars
Side Passenger:4/5 stars
Rollover 4WD:4/5 stars (10.5%)

Sales and reception[edit]

X-Type (2004-06), Australia
Jaguar X-Type 2.0D 2004 Sport-wagon facelift dashboard, UK
X-Type 3.0 estate, US

Interviewed in November 2000, managing director Jonathan Browning said Jaguar's objective was to achieve annual sales of 100,000 with the car, partly by taking market share from established German rivals and partly by expanding the market segment in Jaguar's key markets.[16] The X-Type was Jaguar's best-selling model during almost all its production run,[17] but sales did not meet projections, peaking at 50,000 in 2003.[17] In the United States, the car's primary market, sales dropped from 21,542 in 2004 to 10,941 in 2005.[17] In the same year, Audi sold 48,922 A4s, BMW sold 106,950 3 Series' and Mercedes-Benz sold 60,658 C-Class'.[17]

Ford's decision to use a modified version of the Ford Mondeo platform (shared with the Land Rover Freelander Compact SUV which is also produced at Halewood[18]) for the Jaguar X-Type wasn't received well by some enthusiasts of the marque.[19] Another commonly held belief on the X-Type's failure was that 6-cylinder petrol engines coupled to an economy sapping all-wheel drive system was the only powertrain available,[20] whilst the BMW 3-Series, Audi A4 and Mercedes C-Class were all available with 4-cylinder petrol and diesel power - a crucial offering in the economy conscious European market - yet a 4-cylinder diesel option (with 2-wheel drive) was not offered in the X-Type until several years after its release. Time magazine described the X-Type as the "British Cadillac Cimarron" in its "50 Worst Cars of All Time" list, suggesting its platform sharing made it unpopular.[21] However, it's worth noting that the cars on list were largely based on popularity, sales and aesthetics rather than the performance or quality of the car.

In contrast, Jeremy Clarkson of BBC's Top Gear has repeatedly lauded the car, especially the 4×4 and sport versions. In two episodes he demonstrated its capabilities in the snow, declaring that it "laughs in the face of the weatherman, the police and the AA, with their advice to stay at home". Although he gives an inaccurate representation of the car as being a Ford Mondeo underneath, he affirms that this should not put you off, saying that "genetically, you are 98% identical to a halibut, but it's the 2% that makes the difference".[22]

Other car magazine and website reviews were largely positive for the X-Type, especially during the early years of its introduction.[19][23] In reality, the X-Type used only 20% of Ford Mondeo's components,[24] while a variety of Ford platforms, engines and components were being used by all models of the Ford Motor Company's luxury brands in that period, namely Aston Martin, Jaguar and Lincoln. In 2008, Jaguar director of design Ian Callum said that, despite management denials at the time, the slow-selling X-Type “was essentially designed in Detroit and presented as close to a fait accompli to reluctant designers and engineers at Jaguar's Whitley design centre."[25]

Awards[edit]

Jaguar X-Type won AutoWeek's Editors Choice Award as the Most Significant Car at the Geneva Motor Show of 2001.[26][27]

Replacement[edit]

In January 2011, Jaguar stated that it was considering plans for successor for the X-Type to compete with models such as the BMW 3 Series, and to be positioned below the current XF.[28][29] The project, codenamed X760, is set to be launched in 2015.[30]

In March 2014, Jaguar revealed that the X-Type's 2015 replacement will be named the Jaguar XE, and revealed the first official pictures of the vehicle[31] - although limited to a front-end view and its internal structure, which will be aluminium - a first for the class. The car will use JLR's new 4-cylinder engine range, and will be assembled at Solihull,[32] the first Jaguar saloon to be produced at the historic Rover/Land Rover plant, and the first non-4x4 vehicle to be made at Solihull since the Rover SD1 and Triumph TR7 ceased to be made there in 1981.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Stiff, Peter (15 July 2009). "Jaguar to end X-Type production and axe jobs". business.timesonline.co.uk (London). Retrieved 15 July 2009. 
  2. ^ BBC News 6 January 1998
  3. ^ Jaguar Expands the 2005 X-Type Range with three new models, MediaFord.com, 1 August 2004, [1], accessed 3 Aug 2008
  4. ^ Ruddick, Graham (15 July 2009). "Jaguar cuts 300 jobs as it stops X-Type production at Halewood". Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 21 August 2012. 
  5. ^ "JAGUAR REVEALS ENHANCED XK AND X-TYPE MODEL RANGES AT MOTOREXPO, CANARY WHARF 2007". Mediajaguar.com. 11 June 2007. Retrieved 30 September 2010. 
  6. ^ "Jaguar Reveals The New Generation X-Type". Mediajaguar.com. 12 October 2007. Retrieved 30 September 2010. 
  7. ^ Ruddick, Graham (15 July 2009). "Jaguar cuts 300 jobs as it stops X-Type production at Halewood". Telegraph.co.uk (London: Telegraph Media Group). Retrieved 15 July 2009. 
  8. ^ "Jaguar announces 300 job losses/End of X-Type". BBC News. 15 July 2009. Retrieved 15 July 2009. 
  9. ^ "4 October 2004". Carpages.co.uk. Retrieved 20 February 2011. 
  10. ^ "5 February 2005". Carpages.co.uk. Retrieved 20 February 2011. 
  11. ^ "X-Type Specifications 2009". Jaguar. Retrieved 21 August 2012. 
  12. ^ "X-Type specifications 2008". Jaguar. Retrieved 21 August 2012. 
  13. ^ "Jaguar X-Type; Euro NCAP – For safer cars crash test safety rating". Euro NCAP. Retrieved 2013-11-30. 
  14. ^ http://www.howsafeisyourcar.com.au/2010/Jaguar/X-Type/2_1-LE-X400-4D-Sedan-5sp-auto-2_1L-V6-Petrol/
  15. ^ http://www.safercar.gov/Vehicle+Shoppers/5-Star+Safety+Ratings/1990-2010+Vehicles/Vehicle-Detail?vehicleId=1176
  16. ^ "Mehr Funktionalitaet, ohne dass die Emotionen zu kurz kommen". Auto Motor u. Sport. Heft 23 2000: Seite 24. date November 2000. 
  17. ^ a b c d "Automotive Traveller: The Jaguar S-Type and the Jaguar X-Type". Automotivetraveler.com. Retrieved 30 September 2010. 
  18. ^ "evo Car Reviews: Land Rover Freelander". Evo.co.uk. 8 December 2006. Retrieved 30 September 2010. 
  19. ^ a b "AOL Autos: 2003 Jaguar X-Type Reviews". Autos.aol.com. Retrieved 30 September 2010. 
  20. ^ Aucock, Richard. "7 lessons Jaguar should learn from the X-Type". Richard Aucock - Motoring journalist on cars, motorsport… and motoring journalism. Retrieved 16 September 2013. 
  21. ^ "2001 Jaguar X-Type – The 50 Worst Cars of All". TIME. 7 September 2007. Retrieved 30 September 2010. 
  22. ^ X Type Jaguar in the snow - Top Gear - Series 4 - BBC. BBC. 9 February 2007. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  23. ^ "2003 Jaguar X-Type Review". Road and Travel. Retrieved 30 September 2010. 
  24. ^ "Test Drive: 2002 Jaguar X-Type 2.5". CanadianDriver. 10 January 2002. Retrieved 30 September 2010. 
  25. ^ "Jaguar 'entirely relaxed' about Tata takeover". Ft.com. 28 January 2008. Retrieved 30 September 2010. 
  26. ^ "Jaguar X-Type Wins AutoWeek's Editors Choice Award as Most Significant Car at the Geneva Auto Show. – PR Newswire". Encyclopedia.com. 28 February 2001. Retrieved 6 December 2009. 
  27. ^ "Press Release: Jaguar X-Type Wins AutoWeek's Editors Choice Award as Most Significant Car at the Geneva Auto Show. – PR Newswire | HighBeam Research: Online Press Releases". Highbeam.com. 28 February 2001. Retrieved 6 December 2009. 
  28. ^ "Deja vu? Jaguar considers a sedan to rival 3 series". autonews.com. 31 January 2011. Retrieved 6 February 2011. 
  29. ^ "Jaguar's future models revealed". 18 February 2011. Retrieved 16 March 2011. 
  30. ^ Jaguar plans four new models by 2018 - Autocar, 14 October 2013
  31. ^ Holloway, Hilton. "Jaguar XE 3-series rival - first picture". Autocar. Retrieved 5 March 2014. 
  32. ^ Mullen, Enda. "New Jaguars set to roll off Land Rover line". Birmingham Post. Retrieved 14 Feb 2014. 

External links[edit]

Official website