Jack and Coke

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Jack and Coke
TypeCocktail
Primary alcohol by volume
ServedOn the rocks; poured over ice
Standard drinkware
Collins Glass.gif
Collins glass
Commonly used ingredients
  • 1 part Jack Daniel's Tennessee Whiskey
  • 3 parts Coca-Cola
  • Ice
PreparationPour Jack Daniel's into Collins glass filled with ice. Fill to desired level with Coca-Cola. Stir lightly.
 
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Jack and Coke
TypeCocktail
Primary alcohol by volume
ServedOn the rocks; poured over ice
Standard drinkware
Collins Glass.gif
Collins glass
Commonly used ingredients
  • 1 part Jack Daniel's Tennessee Whiskey
  • 3 parts Coca-Cola
  • Ice
PreparationPour Jack Daniel's into Collins glass filled with ice. Fill to desired level with Coca-Cola. Stir lightly.

Jack and Coke (also referred to as JD and Coke) is a cocktail made with Jack Daniel's whiskey and Coca-Cola. The drink is usually served with ice in an old-fashioned glass or a Collins glass.

According to Massachusetts Beverage Business,[1] the popularity of the Jack and Coke combination was on the rise.[when?] Mike Keyes, Jack Daniel's Senior Vice President and Global Brand Director, was quoted in 2007 as saying that "Over time, more of Jack Daniel's is being consumed with mixers, such as Coca-Cola."[1]

Advertising[edit source | edit]

File:Canned version of Jack and Coke.jpg
A canned version of Jack and Coke.

The term "Jack and Coke" was used[when?] in some combined advertising for Jack Daniel's and Coca-Cola, and several products were created as part of this marketing campaign, including bar signs and taps.[2]

Around 1996, Jack Daniel's released a canned beverage called "Jack Daniel's and Cola", a mixed beverage of the same type as Jack and Coke, in several markets in the South Pacific, including Australia and New Zealand.[3]

See also[edit source | edit]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ a b Walker, Tracy. Walker. It's clear that brown spirits have gained momentum, particularly the Tennessee whiskey segment. Retrieved February 1, 2007.[dead link]
  2. ^ Image: Jack & Coke Bar Tap. Retrieved February 2, 2007.[dead link]
  3. ^ Collins, Glenn. The New York Times. (January 18, 1996). THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING -- ADDENDA; Additional Work On Jack Daniel's. Retrieved February 1, 2007.