JIRA

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JIRA
JIRA logo.svg
JIRA logo
Developer(s)Atlassian, Inc.
Initial release2002[1]
Stable release6.1.7 / 21 January 2014; 49 days ago (2014-01-21)
Written inJava
Operating systemPlatform-independent
TypeBug tracking system, project management software
LicenseProprietary, free for use by official non-profit organizations, charities, and open-source projects, but not religious organizations[2][3]
Websiteatlassian.com/software/jira
 
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JIRA
JIRA logo.svg
JIRA logo
Developer(s)Atlassian, Inc.
Initial release2002[1]
Stable release6.1.7 / 21 January 2014; 49 days ago (2014-01-21)
Written inJava
Operating systemPlatform-independent
TypeBug tracking system, project management software
LicenseProprietary, free for use by official non-profit organizations, charities, and open-source projects, but not religious organizations[2][3]
Websiteatlassian.com/software/jira

JIRA (/ˈi.rə/ JEE-rə)[4] is a proprietary issue tracking product, developed by Atlassian, used for bug tracking, issue tracking and project management. The product name, JIRA, is not an acronym but rather a truncation of "Gojira", the Japanese name for Godzilla.[5] It has been developed since 2002.[1]

License[edit]

JIRA is a commercial software product that can be licensed for running on-premises or available as a hosted application. Pricing depends on the maximum number of users, with approximately $50 per user for in-house and $7 per month per user for the hosted version being typical prices.[6]

Atlassian provides JIRA for free to open source projects that meet certain criteria, and organizations that are non-profit, non-government, non-academic, non-commercial, non-political, and secular.

For academic and commercial customers, the full source code is available under a developer source license.[6]

Starting with JIRA 4, a 10-user starter license costs $10 with all proceeds benefiting Room to Read.[7] Starter licenses are also available for other Atlassian products that can integrate with JIRA, such as Bonfire, Confluence, Crucible, GreenHopper, Bamboo, FishEye and Crowd.[8]

History[edit]

Architecture[edit]

JIRA is written in Java and uses the Pico inversion of control container, Apache OFBiz entity engine, and WebWork 1 technology stack. For Remote Procedure Calls (RPC), JIRA supports SOAP, XML-RPC and REST.[22]

JIRA integrates with source control programs such as Subversion,[23] CVS, Git, Clearcase, Team Foundation Server, Mercurial, and Perforce.[24] It ships with various translations including English, Japanese, German, French, and Spanish.[25]

JIRA's flexible plugin architecture spawned a large number of integrations developed by the JIRA development community and third parties, including IDEs like Eclipse and IntelliJ IDEA using the Atlassian IDE Connector. The JIRA API[26] allows developers to integrate third-party applications into JIRA.

Adoption[edit]

According to Atlassian, JIRA is used for issue tracking and project management by over 25,000 customers in 122 countries around the globe.[27]

Some of the organizations using JIRA for bug-tracking and project management are Linden Lab,[28] JBoss,[29] Spring Framework,[30] Hibernate,[31] Fedora Commons[32] and Skype.[33]

The Apache Software Foundation uses JIRA and Bugzilla.[34] Projects currently using Bugzilla have the option of migrating to JIRA at any time.[35]

JIRA Studio[edit]

The new Atlassian OnDemand features fully integrated cloud-based versions of all Atlassian most popular development tools to help users to take from concept to launch. These services are now offered "à la carte", meaning that users can pick and choose the applications they want. All applications will come automatically integrated, pre-configured and ready to use.

Applications are deployed in the cloud and are offered on SaaS model.

Security[edit]

In April 2010 an XSS vulnerability in JIRA was the stepping stone to the compromise of two Apache Software Foundation servers. The JIRA password database was compromised. The database contained unsalted password hashes which are vulnerable to dictionary lookups and cracking tools so users were advised to change their passwords.[36] Atlassian themselves were also targeted as part of the same attack and admitted that a legacy database with passwords stored in plain text had been compromised.[37]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "About Atlassian – customers, life, community, FedEx days". Atlassian. Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  2. ^ Atlassian. "ATLASSIAN – Open Source Project License Request". Atlassian.com. Retrieved 9 November 2012. 
  3. ^ Atlassian. "ATLASSIAN – Community License Request". Atlassian.com. Retrieved 9 November 2012. 
  4. ^ "How is JIRA pronounced?". Retrieved 17 March 2010. 
  5. ^ "What does JIRA mean?". Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  6. ^ a b "JIRA: Licensing and Pricing". Atlassian. Retrieved 10 July 2011. 
  7. ^ "It's Back! Atlassian Relaunches Starter License Package to benefit Room to Read". Room to Read. 7 October 2009. 
  8. ^ "Starter License". Atlassian. Retrieved 6 October 2009. 
  9. ^ "JIRA 2 – Release Candidate 1". blogs.atlassian.com. 6 February 2003. Retrieved 10 May 2013. 
  10. ^ "JIRA Release Summary". Confluence.atlassian.com. 24 August 2004. Retrieved 5 December 2011. 
  11. ^ "JIRA 3.13 Release Notes". Confluence.atlassian.com. 24 August 2004. Retrieved 22 September 2011. 
  12. ^ "JIRA 4.0 Release Notes". Confluence.atlassian.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  13. ^ "JIRA 4.2 Release Notes". Confluence.atlassian.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  14. ^ "JIRA 4.3 Release Notes". Confluence.atlassian.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  15. ^ "JIRA 4.4 Release Notes". Confluence.atlassian.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  16. ^ "JIRA 5 Released". Atlassian.com. Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  17. ^ "JIRA 5.0 Release Notes". Confluence.atlassian.com. 22 February 2012. Retrieved 22 February 2012. 
  18. ^ "JIRA 5.1 Release Notes". Confluence.atlassian.com. 9 July 2012. Retrieved 23 July 2012. 
  19. ^ "JIRA 5.2 Release Notes". Confluence.atlassian.com. 11 November 2012. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  20. ^ "JIRA 6.0 Release Notes". Confluence.atlassian.com. 21 May 2013. Retrieved 22 May 2013. 
  21. ^ "JIRA 6.1 Release Notes". Confluence.atlassian.com. 24 September 2013. Retrieved 26 September 2013. 
  22. ^ "JIRA RPC Services – JIRA Development". Developer.atlassian.com. 21 October 2011. Retrieved 3 January 2012. 
  23. ^ "Subversion JIRA plugin". Studio.plugins.atlassian.com. 18 July 2012. Retrieved 23 July 2012. 
  24. ^ "Jira Integrating with a Source Control System". 
  25. ^ "Choosing a Default Language". confluence.atlassian.com. Retrieved 13 October 2011. 
  26. ^ "Jira Java Api". Docs.atlassian.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  27. ^ "Atlassian.org". Retrieved 9 July 2013. 
  28. ^ "Bug Tracker – Second Life Wiki". Wiki.secondlife.com. 5 September 2011. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  29. ^ Jboss.org/
  30. ^ "Springframework.org". Jira.springframework.org. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  31. ^ "Atlassian.com". Opensource.atlassian.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  32. ^ "Fedora Repository Project". DuraSpace. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  33. ^ "Skype.com". Developer.skype.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  34. ^ "Apache.org". Issues.apache.org. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  35. ^ "ApacheJira". Retrieved 25 September 2008. 
  36. ^ Golucci, Philip (13 April 2010). "apache.org incident report for 04/09/2010". The Apache Software Foundation. The Apache Infrastructure team. Retrieved 29 May 2013. 
  37. ^ Cannon-Brookes, Mike (13 April 2010). "Oh man, what a day! An update on our security breach". Atlassian Blogs. Atlassian. Retrieved 29 May 2013.