It Never Rains in Southern California

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"It Never Rains in Southern California"
Single by Albert Hammond
from the album It Never Rains in Southern California
B-side"Anyone Here in the Audience"
ReleasedOctober 21, 1972 (United States)
Recorded1972
Length3:49
3:20 (7" version)
LabelMums Records
Writer(s)Albert Hammond, Mike Hazlewood
ProducerAlbert Hammond, Don Altfeld
Albert Hammond singles chronology
"Down by the River"
(1972)
"It Never Rains in Southern California"
(1972)
"If You Gotta Break Another Heart"
(1973)
 
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"It Never Rains in Southern California"
Single by Albert Hammond
from the album It Never Rains in Southern California
B-side"Anyone Here in the Audience"
ReleasedOctober 21, 1972 (United States)
Recorded1972
Length3:49
3:20 (7" version)
LabelMums Records
Writer(s)Albert Hammond, Mike Hazlewood
ProducerAlbert Hammond, Don Altfeld
Albert Hammond singles chronology
"Down by the River"
(1972)
"It Never Rains in Southern California"
(1972)
"If You Gotta Break Another Heart"
(1973)

"It Never Rains in Southern California", written by Albert Hammond and Mike Hazlewood, is the title of a song first released by Hammond, a British born singer-songwriter, in 1972. Hammond's version peaked at number five on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 that year.

In the UK the song is perhaps the quintessential example (alongside The Doobie Brothers "Listen to the Music") of a turntable hit: A song which, although very frequently played and requested on radio, never makes it into the charts. Through the 1970s, the record was re-issued at least 5 times by various labels - but remained outside the UK top 40, despite yet more airplay - it's still to be heard on UK radio on a very regular basis.

The song concerns the struggles of a singer who moves out to California to pursue a career in Hollywood but does not have any success and deteriorates in the process. In the chorus, Hammond sings, "It never rains in California, but girl don't they warn ya. It pours, man it pours."

Contents

Cover versions

The chorus was reprised by Julio Iglesias in 1984's Moonlight Lady, which Hammond co-wrote with Carole Bayer Sager.

Saori Minami covered the song on her 1973 studio album Kizu Tsuku Sedai. Agnes Chan covered the song on her 1973 album With Love From Agnes.

A cover was released by the country music band Trent Summar & The New Row Mob, in 2000 on their self-titled debut album. This version peaked at number 74 on the country music charts.

Chart positions

Albert Hammond version

Chart (1972–73)Peak
position
Japanese Oricon International Chart[1]1
U.S. Billboard AC[2]2
Norwegian VG-lista Singles Chart[3]3
U.S. Billboard Hot 100[2]5
Swiss Singles Chart[4]5
West German Singles Chart[5]9
Japanese Oricon Singles Chart11
Dutch Singles Chart[6]21

Saori Minami version

Chart (1973)Peak
position
Japanese Oricon Singles Chart[7]77

Trent Summar & the New Row Mob version

Chart (2000)Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Songs74
Preceded by
"Holidays, On ira tous au Paradis" by Michel Polnareff
Japanese Oricon International Chart number-one single (Albert Hammond version)
February 19-March 26, 1973
Succeeded by
"You're So Vain" by Carly Simon

In other media

In 2010, the song was featured in the Ben Stiller comedy Greenberg.

The song was played to close the final scene of the last episode of Veronica Mars, when Veronica leaves the polling booth and walks down the sidewalk in the rain.

References

External links