It's Only Make Believe

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"It's Only Make Believe"
Single by Conway Twitty
from the album Conway Twitty Sings
B-side"I'll Try"
ReleasedJuly 14, 1958
Format7" single
GenreCountry, rockabilly, pop
Length2:28
LabelMGM Records
Writer(s)Jack Nance, Conway Twitty
Conway Twitty singles chronology
"I Need Your Lovin'"
(1957)
"It's Only Make Believe"
(1958)
"The Story of My Love"
(1959)
 
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"It's Only Make Believe"
Single by Conway Twitty
from the album Conway Twitty Sings
B-side"I'll Try"
ReleasedJuly 14, 1958
Format7" single
GenreCountry, rockabilly, pop
Length2:28
LabelMGM Records
Writer(s)Jack Nance, Conway Twitty
Conway Twitty singles chronology
"I Need Your Lovin'"
(1957)
"It's Only Make Believe"
(1958)
"The Story of My Love"
(1959)

"It's Only Make Believe" is a song written by Jack Nance and American country music artist Conway Twitty, released by Twitty as a single in July 1958. The single topped both U.S.[1] and the UK Singles Chart,[2] and was Twitty's only number-one single on the pop charts of either country. It is believed that Twitty wrote his part of the song while sitting on a fire escape outside his hotel room, to escape the summer heat, in Hamilton, Ontario. Twitty had come to Canada at the request of another American singer, Rompin' Ronnie Hawkins, due to Hawkins saying to Twitty that Canada was the 'promised land' for music.[citation needed]

Twitty recorded many subsequent versions of "It's Only Make Believe", including a 1970 duet with Loretta Lynn on their very first collaborative album, We Only Make Believe. Twitty joins in on the last verse in a 1988 uptempo cover by Ronnie McDowell, which was a #8 hit on the country music charts. Additionally, Twitty contributed to an alternative cover by McDowell.

Content[edit]

The song's lyrics describe the thoughts and feelings of a man who is in a one-way relationship: he has a girlfriend, but she does not love him and only stays in the relationship for appearances, a fact of which he is painfully aware. He hopes and prays that, at some point in the future, the woman whom he is in love with will return his love, but laments that, at present, "it's only make believe."[citation needed]

Chart performance[edit]

Conway Twitty version[edit]

Chart (1958-1959)Peak
position
Australian Singles Chart5
Canadian Singles Chart1
Italian Singles Chart9
Norwegian Singles Chart2
UK Singles Chart[2]1
US Billboard Hot 1001

Cover versions[edit]

Chart performance[edit]

Glen Campbell version[edit]

Chart (1970)Peak
position
Australian Kent Music Report1[4]
Canadian RPM Country Tracks4
Canadian RPM Top Singles5
Euro Hit 5010
Irish Singles Chart3
New Zealand Singles Chart2
U.K. Singles Chart4
U.S. Billboard Hot 10010
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles3
U.S. Billboard Easy Listening2

Year-end chart[edit]

Chart (1970)Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot 10099
Canadian RPM Top Singles76
U.S. Cashbox Top 10066

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits: Eighth Edition. Record Research. p. 647. 
  2. ^ a b Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. pp. 92–3. ISBN 1-904994-10-5. 
  3. ^ "RPM Country Tracks". RPM. February 23, 1991. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Go-Set Australian charts - 26 December 1970". Poparchives.com.au. 1970-12-26. Retrieved 2013-02-14. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
"It's All in the Game"
by Tommy Edwards
Billboard Hot 100 number one single
10 November 1958 (one week)
Succeeded by
"Tom Dooley"
by The Kingston Trio
Preceded by
"Tom Dooley"
by The Kingston Trio
Billboard Hot 100 number one single
24 November 1958 (one week)
Succeeded by
"To Know Him Is to Love Him"
by The Teddy Bears