Ira Flatow

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Ira Flatow
Ira Flatow.jpg
Ira Flatow receiving the National Science Board Public Service Award in 2005
Born(1949-03-09) March 9, 1949 (age 64)[1][2]
New York City, New York, U.S.[2]
ShowScience Friday
NetworkPublic Radio International
Time slotFriday
StyleHost
CountryUnited States
Previous show(s)Newton's Apple
WebsitePersonal website
Science Friday website
 
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Ira Flatow
Ira Flatow.jpg
Ira Flatow receiving the National Science Board Public Service Award in 2005
Born(1949-03-09) March 9, 1949 (age 64)[1][2]
New York City, New York, U.S.[2]
ShowScience Friday
NetworkPublic Radio International
Time slotFriday
StyleHost
CountryUnited States
Previous show(s)Newton's Apple
WebsitePersonal website
Science Friday website

Ira Flatow (/ˈaɪərə ˈflt/; born March 9, 1949) is a radio and television journalist and author who hosts Public Radio International's popular Science Friday.[3] On TV, he hosted the Emmy Award-winning Newton's Apple, a television science program for children and their families.[4] He hosted the PBS series Big Ideas[5] and has published several books, the most recent titled Present At The Future: From Evolution to Nanotechnology, Candid and Controversial Conversations on Science And Nature.[4]

Personal life[edit]

Flatow is a native of New York and currently lives in Connecticut.[3]

Career[edit]

In 1969, Flatow began working in radio at WBFO, in Buffalo, New York, first as a reporter covering Vietnam anti-war demonstrations and riots and then as news director, 1971. During this time, he was working on an engineering degree at the State University of New York at Buffalo. Flatow's first science stories were created in 1970 during the first Earth Day.[3]

National Public Radio[edit]

From 1971 to 1986, he was on staff at NPR serving as a production assistant, associate producer, producer and science correspondent and reported on topics including the Kennedy Space Center, Three Mile Island, HIV/AIDS and the South Pole. From 1991-2013 he hosted of Science Friday, which he anchored each Friday discussing topics in science and technology.[3][4]

PRI, Public Radio International[edit]

On January 1, 2014 Science Friday program moved to PRI, Public Radio International with Flatow as host. The radio program airs from the City University of New York CUNY Graduate Center studios.

Television[edit]

From 1982 through 1987 he hosted the Emmy Award-winning PBS science program Newton's Apple, which originated at KTCA in St. Paul, Minnesota. In 1991, he wrote and reported science and technology for CBS News' "CBS This Morning." He has discussed cutting edge science on a number of programs, including the Cablevision program Maximum Science. He hosted the PBS series Big Ideas produced by WNET. His TV credits include science reporter for CBS This Morning, Westinghouse, and cable's CNBC. He wrote, produced and hosted an hour-long documentary about the history of the transistor called "Transistorized!", which aired on PBS. He has talked about science on a number TV shows including Merv Griffin, Today, Charlie Rose, and Oprah. He has written three books that popularize topics in science and technology: Rainbows, Curveballs, and Other Wonders of the Natural World Explained, They All Laughed... From Light Bulbs to Lasers: The Fascinating Stories Behind the Great Inventions That Have Changed Our Lives, and Present at the Future: From Evolution to Nanotechnology, Candid and Controversial Conversations on Science and Nature.[4][6]

Flatow is founder and president of the Science Friday Initiative (previously TalkingScience) a non-profit company dedicated to creating radio, TV, and Internet projects aimed making science user friendly.[4][7]

In 2009, Flatow had a voice cameo appearance as himself on the CBS sitcom The Big Bang Theory in "The Vengeance Formulation" (season 3, episode 9). In the episode, Flatow interviews Dr. Sheldon Cooper (Jim Parsons) on his research on magnetic monopoles. Flatow was given a guest-star credit.

In 2012, Flatow was referenced in the 3rd season Archer episode, Skin Game, by title character Sterling Archer.

In 2013, Flatow appears as himself in person for another guest-star appearance on The Big Bang Theory, interviewing Dr. Sheldon Cooper and Dr. Leonard Hofstadter on Science Friday about Cooper's failed discovery in "The Discovery Dissipation" (season 7, episode 10).

Honors and awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ira Flatow". Amazon.com. Retrieved 19 January 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "Ira Flatow". Retrieved 19 January 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Ira Flatow". NPR. Retrieved 19 January 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d e "Ira Flatow". National Public Radio. Retrieved January 15, 2013.
  5. ^ "Big Ideas". WNET, New York Public Media. Retrieved 19 January 2013. 
  6. ^ "Ira Flatow: 2005 Honorary Member". Sigma XI. Retrieved 19 January 2013. 
  7. ^ "Science Friday Initiative". Retrieved 19 January 2013. 

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]