InTown Suites

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Intown Suites
TypePrivate
IndustryLodging, extended stay
Founded1988 (Atlanta)
HeadquartersCobb County, Georgia, USA
Websitewww.intownsuites.com
 
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Intown Suites
TypePrivate
IndustryLodging, extended stay
Founded1988 (Atlanta)
HeadquartersCobb County, Georgia, USA
Websitewww.intownsuites.com

Intown Suites is a chain of extended stay facilities in the United States, headquartered in unincorporated Cobb County, Georgia.[1] The chain caters to traveling workers and guests in transition between homes or apartments. The suites are also suited to individuals and families that experience loss of a home due to storm damage or other natural disasters. Intown Suites is currently one of the fastest growing extended-stay chains in the United States, with 138 locations in 21 states, mostly located in the south and central parts of the country. The company is known for low weekly rates and apartment style amenities.

Rates and services[edit]

InTown Suites location in Roswell, Georgia

Currently, weekly rates range from $149 to $259, depending on the market. Guests are charged by the week rather than the night, with no discounts from the weekly rate for stays that are fewer than seven days. However, it is stated on the chain's website that a stay of three nights provides a discount as opposed to a regular hotel.

The chain strives to be the cost/value leader in all markets that it serves. Three locations, all in the Atlanta area, have the lowest weekly rate of $149. Though intended by the company to be profitable, they function in the way a loss leader does for a business, by attracting customers to the chain on the basis that weekly rates are "as low as $149."

The company, which owns and operates all of its locations[2] rather than franchising them, has become one of the most successful extended-stay companies in the United States, while at the same time, has been considered controversial in its treatment of guests.

Much of this controversy stems from the fact that InTown Suites is a limited service lodging facility. The company offers value to its guests by providing rooms with apartment-style amenities, such as kitchenettes, on-site guest laundry and free high-speed internet. This is provided at low weekly rates. In order to maintain these rates, the company does not provide the amenities offered by more traditional nightly stay hotels, such as soap, shampoo, towel replacements, or daily housekeeping. The chain also usually does not provide swimming pools or free breakfasts. Though cost-conscious extended-stay guests consider the trade-off worthwhile, others accustomed to more traditional lodging report disappointment in the services and have advised that renting a home or an apartment on a short term basis is actually just as cost effective when trading off for security and privacy.

History[edit]

Intown Suites was founded in 1988 by David Vickers.[3] During two decades of existence, Intown Suites has proved to be a very successful business, and is currently one of the fastest growing extended-stay chains.

In 1998, Intown Suites expanded from 26 to 76 properties in a $150 million investment, an alternative to going public. In 2001, Intown Suites had a room occupancy rate of 87%, compared with a 73% average for the entire industry.[4] In 2002, Intown Suites expanded by purchasing Suburban Lodges of America for $99 million,[5] four years later they acquired SuiteOne hotels.[6] In 2007, InTown Suites purchased another 12 Suburban Lodge locations in Georgia, Florida and Alabama, plus two additional Suburban Lodge locations in Houston, Texas a year later.

Criticism[edit]

While Intown Suites strives to provide quality lodging and temporary housing at a cost as low as possible, the company has been criticized over various issues for not doing enough to address the issues and clean up the image of the company.

Many of the employees are ill-advised and lack customer service skills. The BBB has numerous complaints against the company particularly for its undesirable employees[citation needed]. The low cost of Intown Suites, many located in suburban areas, has also drawn lower income customers. In some upper- and middle-class communities, such as one in Minneapolis, police departments have complained that the locations draw an undesirable population to these areas not accustomed to crime.[7]

In October 2010 Minneapolis Management refused to reimburse a customer who's belongings were ruined by a fire sprinkler from a room on an upper floor. The sprinkler activated due to a fire in the kitchenet in the room directly above his, ruining his work documents and personal belongings. The motel at first paid him only $15.00 for laundry services sighting the fine print in the lease agreement. After repeated attempts Management refused to pay anything until the Minneapolis Star Tribune Newspaper published the investigative story. [8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Low Weekly Rates!." InTown Suites. Retrieved on November 18, 2009.
  2. ^ Remco Software, Inc. Case Study (undated). "InTown Suites Manages Data from 100+ Properties with the Corporate Reporting Module". 
  3. ^ Wilbert, Caroline (August 20, 2002). "Extended-Stay Hotels' Business Remains Sweet in a Sour Economy". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. 
  4. ^ "InTown Suites Completes Suburban Lodge Acquisition; InTown Suites Becomes Largest Owner/Operator of Economy Extended-Stay Hotels". Business Wire. May 1, 2002. 
  5. ^ Poole, Shelia M. (January 30, 2002). "Atlanta-Based Hotel Companies to Merge". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. 
  6. ^ Extended Stay Hotel Chains Compared - Biz-stay.com
  7. ^ Low-priced inns draw police calls, Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN)], October 13, 2003
  8. ^ In October 2010 Minneapolis Management refused to reimburse a customer who's belongings were ruined by a fire sprinkler from a room on an upper floor. The sprinkler activated due to a fire in the kitchenet in the room directly above his, ruining his work documents and personal belongings. The motel at first paid him only $15.00 for laundry services citing the fine print in the lease agreement. After repeated attempts Management refused to pay anything until the Minneapolis Star Tribune Newspaper published the investigative story. http://goliath.ecnext.com/coms2/gi_0199-13664173/WHISTLEBLOWER-He-feels-soaked-by.html

External links[edit]