Institute for Security and Cooperation in Space

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Institute for Security and Cooperation in Space
(ISCIS)
TypeNon-profit organization
Founded2001
HeadquartersVancouver, British Columbia
Loja, Ecuador
Key peopleDr. Carol Rosin, Founder
Alfred Webre, Founder
Websitewww.peaceinspace.com
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Institute for Security and Cooperation in Space
(ISCIS)
TypeNon-profit organization
Founded2001
HeadquartersVancouver, British Columbia
Loja, Ecuador
Key peopleDr. Carol Rosin, Founder
Alfred Webre, Founder
Websitewww.peaceinspace.com

The Institute for Security and Cooperation in Space (ISCIS) formerly known as Institute for Cooperation in Space (ICIS) commonly known as Peace in Space is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt, non-profit foundation whose mission is to educate decision makers and the general public about the importance of banning Space-based weaponry and establishing a strict international policy of neutrality preventing the weaponization of space.[1]

History[edit]

The ISCIS was founded in 2001 by Dr. Carol Rosin, a former spokesperson for the late Wernher von Braun and Dr. Alfred Webre, a former Senior Policy Analyst at the Center for the Study of Social Policy at SRI International. ISCIS continues the work of the Institute for Security and Cooperation in Outer Space (ISCOS), founded by Rosin in 1983.[1]

In 2011 ISCIS released a plan of action regarding the Outer Space Security and Development Treaty, a treaty founded upon preventing a destabilization or arms race in space and to create an internationally accepted weapons-free realm on the moon or any other celestial body [2]

Objectives[edit]

The ISCIS is a strong promoter of the Space Preservation Treaty, a proposed international treaty to ban space weapons in whole, an expansion on part of the Outer Space Treaty, which bars States Parties to the Treaty from placing nuclear weapons or any other weapons of mass destruction in orbit of Earth, installing them on the Moon or any other celestial body, or to otherwise station them in outer space.[3] The Treaty would establish a peacekeeping agency to monitor outer space and enforce the ban on space-based weapons.[citation needed] Its U.S. national companion, the Space Preservation Act, HR 3657 and HR 2977, was introduced for the fourth and last time to the United States House of Representatives by Congressman Dennis Kucinich on May 18, 2005.[4]

ISCIS believes that by banning space weapons, the idea is that it will put a literal “lid” on the war industry and allow for a peaceful space exploration industry.[5]

ISCIS is a supporter of research in the field of Ufology, most of its founding members hold high beliefs in extraterrestrial intelligence and advanced extraterrestrial civilizations[6]

ISCIS also wishes to harness safe and clean energies, space age technology and other products and services that can be potential used to combat global problems such as health, poverty, education, pollution, global warming, sustainable development, environmental degradation, and other modern issues.[5]

Funding and support[edit]

ISCIS has received the support of various Canadian politicians, including Hon. Paul Hellyer, former Minister of Defence and Svend Robinson, former Member of Parliament.

The Board of Directors and Advisors of ISCIS is made up of former astronauts Edgar Mitchell and Dr. Brian O'Leary, as well as Arthur C. Clarke, General Counsel Daniel Sheehan, and a founder of International Earth Day (March 21), John McConnell.[6]

References[edit]

External links[edit]