In the Flesh (TV series)

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In the Flesh
Genre

Supernatural drama

Horror
FormatDrama
Created byDominic Mitchell
Written byDominic Mitchell
Directed byJonny Campbell
Starring
Country of originUnited Kingdom
Original language(s)English
No. of series1 (second series commissioned)
No. of episodes3
Production
Producer(s)Ann Harrison-Baxter
Broadcast
Original channel
Picture format
Original run17 March 2013 (2013-03-17) – present
External links
Website
 
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In the Flesh
Genre

Supernatural drama

Horror
FormatDrama
Created byDominic Mitchell
Written byDominic Mitchell
Directed byJonny Campbell
Starring
Country of originUnited Kingdom
Original language(s)English
No. of series1 (second series commissioned)
No. of episodes3
Production
Producer(s)Ann Harrison-Baxter
Broadcast
Original channel
Picture format
Original run17 March 2013 (2013-03-17) – present
External links
Website

In the Flesh is a three-part BBC supernatural drama series which began airing on BBC Three on 17 March 2013. The show was created and written by Dominic Mitchell.[1] It is set after "The Rising", this show's take on a zombie apocalypse, and focuses on re-animated teenager Kieren Walker as he comes back into the local community.

A second, extended series of the show has been commissioned, to be broadcast in 2014.[2][3] As yet, it is unknown how many episodes the new series will comprise, but it is believed it will be five or six.

Premise[edit source | edit]

Set in the fictional village of Roarton (Lancashire, England) after The Rising, in which teenager Kieren Walker was re-animated along with thousands of people who died in the year 2009. There quickly followed 'The Pale Wars' in which the zombies were hunted and killed by armed bands of militia. After months of rehabilitation and medication, the zombies (now referred to as partially deceased syndrome (PDS) patients by the government, but pejoratively known as "rotters") are judged ready to return to society, their homes and families. They are given cosmetics and contact lenses, so they can 'pass,' and to conceal their partially deceased status. They must maintain a strict program of medication to avoid going "rabid" again, which is one injection a day. Many are haunted by returning memories of the atrocities they committed while rabid. In the extremist village of Roarton, PDS sufferers face prejudice from the villagers upon their return.

Cast[edit source | edit]

Episodes[edit source | edit]

#TitleDirected byWritten byOriginal air dateUK viewers
1"Episode 1"Jonny CampbellDominic Mitchell17 March 2013 (2013-03-17)668,000[5]
Kieren Walker, one of thousands of individuals affected by Partially Deceased Syndrome (PDS), returns home to Roarton. He has been subjected to months of rehabilitation and medication at a special, defended unit, specifically designed to keep the PDS sufferers in. The government that has set an agenda of acceptance and tolerance. However, a cauldron of brutal anti-rotter sentiment exists and is gathering support, especially within the church. 
2"Episode 2"Jonny CampbellDominic Mitchell24 March 2013 (2013-03-24)392,000[6]
Kieren feels trapped at home and escapes to his grave, where he is reunited with his old hunting partner Amy Dyer - who persuades him to take a dangerous day trip. He discovers that Rick, his lover who was killed by an IED in Afghanistan, is back in town, so he flies to him at his militia-based local pub. After an awkward reunion, he finds himself on a hunting mission in the woods, where the night patrol has reported live rabid rotters roaming free. Kieren persuades them to hand the "rotters" in for a reward rather than kill them. 
3"Episode 3"Jonny CampbellDominic Mitchell31 March 2013 (2013-03-31)525,000[7]
Kieren visits the supermarket where he used to hunt, which brings back memories of when Jem spared his life. The siblings then confront their past issues and drop in to see the Lancasters, parents of a girl he killed. Kieren begins to feel better, but must say goodbye to Amy, who is leaving Roarton in search of The Undead Prophet. At the end of the episode, tragedy strikes Kieren after Bill kills Rick, claiming he is not the real Rick, leaving the body leaning against Kieren's garage. Kieren storms in to confront Bill, but ultimately leaves. Bill is then shot by Ken Burton, whose PDS-afflicted wife was murdered by Bill at the end of the first episode. 

Reception[edit source | edit]

In the Flesh received generally positive reviews, with praise being given to the series' premise. The Daily Telegraph's Simon Horsford praised Mitchell and called the premise "a clever idea", despite having initial misgivings over the continued use of zombies.[8] Morgan Jeffery, writing for Digital Spy, called the idea a "risk".[9] Comparisons were made between the show and previous shows aired on BBC Three: The Fades and Being Human.

The series launched with 668,000 viewers, the highest of all the episodes.[5] The first episode was rated 3 out of 5 stars by Jeffery. Jeffery praised the performance of the actors and the cinematography, particularly highlighting the scene where Ken's wife is shot. However, he noted that there were times when "the two facets of In The Flesh fail to gel effectively". Overall, he believed it may not have "hit its stride" in the first week, but would continue to watch the show for the next two weeks.[9] Den of Geek's Louisa Mellor also highlighted the scene with Ken's wife, and praised the episode. She said the story had a "reflective" feel, which distinguished it from other zombies stories.[10][11]

The second episode received 392,000 viewers, a significant decrease from the first episode.[6] However, critical response to the episode improved, and Jeffery rated the second episode 4 out of 5. He praised the banter between Kieran and Amy, as well as the appearance of rabid zombies toward the end.[12] Mellor called Amy a "jolt of electricity on screen", and wanted to learn more about the thoughts of Bill Macy.[13] Dave Golder, for SFX, also gave the episode 4 out of 5 episodes, and praised the episode's conclusion and rabid PDS sufferers. Golder felt Amy was occasionally "a little bit too broad", but praised her acting when Kieran reveals he killed himself.[14]

525,000 viewers watched the finale, an increase from the previous episode but still not as high as the first one.[7] Jeffery rated the episode 3.5 out of 5; he praised Cains and her interaction with Newberry, and the death of Rick, but noted that many plots were left unresolved.[15]

Series Two[edit source | edit]

A second, extended series of the show has been commissioned, to be broadcast in 2014.[2] It will take place in Roarton, where a fragile peace has been reached after the shocking events of Series One. While Kieren is hoping to get on with his second life, new, explosive characters could throw those plans into disarray. Battle lines are drawn and all will be judged.[16]

See also[edit source | edit]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ a b c Sim, Krystal (17 March 2013). "In The Flesh creator Dominic Mitchell on episode 1 secrets | SciFiNow - The World's Best Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Magazine". SciFiNow. Retrieved 1 April 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Zai Bennett, Controller, BBC Three (2013-05-22). "BBC Three announces new series commission of zombie drama In The Flesh". Bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2013-09-06. 
  3. ^ "In The Flesh Recommissioned For Extended Series". News In Time And Space. Retrieved 22 May 2013. 
  4. ^ "New BBC Three talent are joined by Kenneth Cranham and Ricky Tomlinson as filming begins on zombie drama, In The Flesh". BBC Website. Retrieved 24 February 2013. 
  5. ^ a b Fletcher, Alex (18 March 2013). "'Got To Dance' ends with over 1 million viewers on Sky1 - TV News". Digital Spy. Retrieved 3 April 2013. 
  6. ^ a b Fletcher, Alex (26 March 2013). "'Our Girl' watched by 5.3 million on Sunday night". Digital Spy. Retrieved 28 March 2013. 
  7. ^ a b Fletcher, Alex (2 April 2013). "'The Village' opens with big ratings on BBC One". Digital Spy. Retrieved 3 April 2013. 
  8. ^ Horsford, Simon (18 Mar 2013). "In The Flesh, BBC Three, review". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 4 April 2013. 
  9. ^ a b Jeffery, Morgan (17 March 2013). "In The Flesh episode 1 review: Zombie horror meets kitchen sink drama". Digital Spy. Retrieved 4 April 2013. 
  10. ^ Mellor, Louisa (17 March 2013). "In The Flesh episode 1 review". Den of Geek. Retrieved 4 April 2013. 
  11. ^ Mellor, Louisa (28 February 2013). "Spoiler-free In The Flesh episode 1 review". Den of Geek. Retrieved 4 April 2013. 
  12. ^ Jeffery, Morgan (24 March 2013). "'In The Flesh' review: Superb zombie drama evolves in week two". Digital Spy. Retrieved 4 April 2013. 
  13. ^ Mellor, Louisa (24 March 2013). "In The Flesh episode 2 review". Den of Geek. Retrieved 4 April 2013. 
  14. ^ Golder, David (24 March 2013). "In The Flesh 1.02 REVIEW". SFX. Retrieved 4 April 2013. 
  15. ^ Jeffery, Morgan (31 March 2013). "'In The Flesh' episode three review: A powerful but incomplete finale". Digital Spy. Retrieved 9 April 2013. 
  16. ^ Zai Bennett, Controller, BBC Three (2013-05-22). "Media Centre - BBC Three announces new series commission of In The Flesh". BBC. Retrieved 2013-09-06. 

External links[edit source | edit]