Imperial Klans of America

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Imperial Klans of America
Formation1997
TypeKu Klux Klan
HeadquartersDawson Springs, Kentucky, U.S.
Imperial WizardRon Edwards
Websitewww.kkkk.net
 
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Imperial Klans of America
Formation1997
TypeKu Klux Klan
HeadquartersDawson Springs, Kentucky, U.S.
Imperial WizardRon Edwards
Websitewww.kkkk.net

The Imperial Klans of America, Knights of the Ku Klux Klan is a white supremacist organization styled after the original Ku Klux Klan (KKK). In 2008, it was reported that the IKA had the nation's second largest KKK membership.[1]

The IKA, headed by Ron Edwards, claims to be the sixth era of the Ku Klux Klan. Members of the 6th era, like members of previous eras, claim constitutional rights as part of the "Unorganized Militia". The IKA claims to stand upon Supreme Court decisions in favor of previous Klans.[2] They are headquartered near Dawson Springs, Kentucky and claim external Imperial Klan offices in Australia, Canada, England, Scotland, South Africa, South America, and throughout Europe.

The IKA was featured on National Geographic's "Inside American Terror" in 2008 and The History Channel's Gangland in 2009.[3]

In 2011, a recurring hoax concerning the IKA endorsing Barack Obama was once again exposed as a farce based on a parody website's humorous reporting.[4] In fact, in 2008, Ron Edwards was quoted as supporting John McCain.[5]

Gruver v. IKA[edit]

In July 2006, 3 IKA members beat Jordan Gruver, a 16-year-old of Native American and Panamanian descent at a Kentucky county fair.[6] In February 2007, IKA members Jarred Hensley and Andrew Watkins were convicted and sentenced to three years in prison for beating Gruver.[7] The Southern Poverty Law Center also filed a civil suit on Gruver's behalf in Meade County, Kentucky against IKA "Imperial Wizard" Ron Edwards and the IKA for the actions of the IKA members. Morris Dees, together with William F. McMurry of Louisville, KY, represented Jordan Gruver in the trial against the IKA.[8] On November 14, 2008, a jury of seven men and seven women awarded $1.5 million in compensatory damages and $1 million in punitive damages to Gruver against Edwards.[9] Edwards appealed the ruling, and the court overturned the decision on January 14, 2011, sending it to a second trial in the original court venue.[10] His appeal was ultimately denied by the Kentucky Supreme Court.[citation needed]

During the case, the SPLC received nearly a dozen threats "promising the most dangerous threat" ever faced.[11] A July 2007 letter allegedly came from Hal Turner, a white supremacist talk show host.[11] In 2007, Terrence was shown on CNN speaking at an event on the IKA Headquarters' grounds.[12] On the second day of the civil trial, a former member of the IKA testified that the Klan had told him to kill Southern Poverty Law Center chief attorney Morris Dees.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "No. 2 Klan group on trial in Ky. teen's beating". Associated Press. November 11, 2008. Retrieved November 22, 2008. 
  2. ^ "Imperial Klans of America International Headquarters". Imperial Klans of America. 2008. Archived from the original on August 10, 2007. Retrieved September 18, 2007. 
  3. ^ "KKK: Inside American Terror". National Geographic. 2008. Retrieved November 18, 2008. 
  4. ^ http://www.snopes.com/politics/obama/kkk.asp
  5. ^ http://www.esquire.com/the-side/feature/racists-support-obama-061308
  6. ^ "Jury awards $2.5 million to teen beaten by Klan members - CNN.com". CNN. November 17, 2008. Retrieved May 5, 2010. 
  7. ^ "Reputed Klan leader denies role in Meade Co. beating". Louisville Courier-Journal. August 15, 2007. Retrieved September 18, 2007. [dead link]
  8. ^ McMurry, William. "Klan ordered to pay $2.5 million in civil trial". Courtroomlaw.com. Retrieved September 18, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Jury awards $2.5M to teen beaten by Klan members". CNN. November 14, 2008. Retrieved Novembdr 18, 2008. 
  10. ^ Caperton, Clayton, and Buckingham, Judges. "Court of Appeals of Kentucky: Edwards v. Hensley". findlaw.com. Retrieved December 12, 2012. 
  11. ^ a b Klass, Kym (August 17, 2007). "Southern Poverty Law Center beefs up security". Montgomery Advertiser. Archived from the original on September 29, 2007. Retrieved September 18, 2007. 
  12. ^ "The Noose, An American Nightmare" CNN Special
  13. ^ Barrouquere, Brett (November 13, 2008). "Former member: Ky. Klan plotted to kill attorney". USA Today. Retrieved December 12, 2012. 

External links[edit]