Chicago–Kansas City Expressway

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Chicago kc sign.svg
Route 110 marker Illinois Route 110 marker

Chicago–Kansas City Expressway
Route 110
Route information
Length:524.561 mi[1][2] (844.199 km)
Missouri: 199.561 mi (321.162 km)
Illinois: 325 mi (523 km)
Existed:May 27, 2010 – present
Major junctions
West end: I-35 / I-435 in Claycomo, MO
  I-35 / US 36 in Cameron, MO
I-72 / US 36 in Hannibal, MO
I-72 / I-172 / US 36 in Hull, IL
I-172 / US 24 / IL 336 in Quincy, IL
I-74 / US 34 in Galesburg, IL
I-74 / I-80 / I-280 in Colona, IL
I-80 / I-88 / IL 5 / IL 92 in East Moline, IL
I-39 / US 51 in Rochelle, IL
I-355 in Downers Grove, IL
I-88 / I-290 / I-294 in Hillside, IL
East end: I-90 / I-94 / I-290 in Chicago, IL
Highway system
Missouri Highways
Supplemental
Illinois state highway system
Illinois Tollway system
Route 109Route 111
IL 109IL 111
 
  (Redirected from Illinois Route 110)
Jump to: navigation, search

Chicago kc sign.svg
Route 110 marker Illinois Route 110 marker

Chicago–Kansas City Expressway
Route 110
Route information
Length:524.561 mi[1][2] (844.199 km)
Missouri: 199.561 mi (321.162 km)
Illinois: 325 mi (523 km)
Existed:May 27, 2010 – present
Major junctions
West end: I-35 / I-435 in Claycomo, MO
  I-35 / US 36 in Cameron, MO
I-72 / US 36 in Hannibal, MO
I-72 / I-172 / US 36 in Hull, IL
I-172 / US 24 / IL 336 in Quincy, IL
I-74 / US 34 in Galesburg, IL
I-74 / I-80 / I-280 in Colona, IL
I-80 / I-88 / IL 5 / IL 92 in East Moline, IL
I-39 / US 51 in Rochelle, IL
I-355 in Downers Grove, IL
I-88 / I-290 / I-294 in Hillside, IL
East end: I-90 / I-94 / I-290 in Chicago, IL
Highway system
Missouri Highways
Supplemental
Illinois state highway system
Illinois Tollway system
Route 109Route 111
IL 109IL 111

The Chicago – Kansas City Expressway is a highway that runs between Chicago, Illinois and Claycomo, Missouri. The road is known as Route 110 in Missouri and Illinois Route 110 (IL 110) in Illinois. IL 110 was created through legislation on May 27, 2010 as the designated route for the Illinois portion of the Chicago - Kansas City Expressway.

Route description[edit source | edit]

Missouri[edit source | edit]

The Expressway starts in downtown Claycomo, Missouri on Interstate 35 and leaves the city in a northeast direction. In Cameron, Missouri, the route turns east on U.S. 36 and crosses the state including driving through Chillicothe, Missouri and Macon, Missouri. East of Hannibal, Missouri, the route continues east on I-72 through Hannibal and across the Mississippi River.[3] U.S. 36 and Interstate 35 in Missouri are now in the process to have the comprehensive sign package similar to Illinois along the Chicago–Kansas City Expressway, including the Route 110 designation and the C-KC logo on every route marker between Hannibal and Kansas City.[4]

The sign inside Missouri consists of three letters, CKC. The first C is shaded red.

Illinois[edit source | edit]

IL 110 crosses into Illinois from the Mark Twain Memorial Bridge east of Hannibal. It follows Interstate 72 (I-72) east to I-172, then runs north with I-172 to IL 336 around the city of Quincy. Both routes run north to Carthage, where IL 110 and IL 336 join with U.S. Route 136 (US 136). All three routes run east to Macomb, where IL 110 then continues north with US 67 to Monmouth.

At Monmouth, IL 110 joins US 34 and runs east to I-74. IL 110 then joins I-74 and runs north to near the Quad Cities, joining with I-80 before joining I-88 eastbound. The two highways continue east to I-88's eastern terminus in Hillside, where IL 110 continues on I-290, terminating at the Circle Interchange near the Chicago Loop.

History[edit source | edit]

Cannon Ball Route[edit source | edit]

The Cannon Ball Route was a historic auto trail that ran from Hannibal, Missouri east-northeast to Chicago, Illinois.[5] The route was included in the 1917 Map of Marked Routes provided by the Illinois State Highway Department, a precursor to the modern-day Illinois Department of Transportation.

This highway routing closely parallels the Hannibal-Quincy to Chicago branch of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. This route stayed west and north of the Illinois River, so this route never had to cross the limited number of Illinois River bridges in 1917.

Southern Illinois[edit source | edit]

IL 110 was the designation for what is present-day IL 15 from St. Libory, Illinois to just south of Addieville, where it meets up with IL 160. During the World War II years, IL 15 was part of what is now IL 160, and the section from St. Libory to Addieville was IL 110. The number was dropped in favor of US 460; the present IL 15 and IL 160 routings came in the mid-1960s.

Raven Road in Washington County is a stub of the former IL 15, and that intersection was the eastern terminus of IL 110.

Current route[edit source | edit]

Efforts to construct a direct route from Chicago to Kansas City have been in the planning stages since its exclusion from the Interstate Highway System in the 1950s. These efforts have been led by the Tri-State Development Summit, an economic development group for western Illinois, southeastern Iowa, and northern Missouri[6][7] The proposed highway took different forms over time: a 1989 study found that a full, limited-access tollway running from Kansas Turnpike at Kansas City to the Indiana Toll Road at Gary or Tri-State Tollway near the Joliet area would cost $2–$2.5 billion, if funded entirely by private investors.[8]

In a joint resolution between the Illinois House and Senate in late May 2010,[9] an expressway project connecting Chicago-to-Kansas City will be named Illinois Route 110. The path, 532 miles in total,[10] follows parts of the existing Illinois Route 336, Interstate 88, Interstate 172, Interstate 72, Interstate 74, U.S. Route 136, U.S. Route 67, and connect the cities of Quincy, Macomb, Galesburg, a number of communities of the Chicago metropolitan area, including Chicago itself on Interstate 290.[6][7][11]

As of August 11, 2010, signs have been posted on Interstate 88 between Naperville Road and Illinois Route 83 saying "CKC Illinois 110".[12][13]

As of August 29, 2010, signs have been posted on US 67 in Warren and McDonough Counties with Illinois 110 and the "CKC" Logo Banner above the Route 110 sign. As of August 31, 2010, signs are on IL 336 and posted through the City of Macomb as of October 2011. As of September 30, 2010, signs have been posted on 290 from Wolf road In Hillside to Circle Interchange in the city of Chicago. The Illinois 110 and the "CKC" Logo Banner is posted above the Route 110 sign. The Illinois Department of Transportation erected 470 IL 110 (CKC) signs at a cost of $94,000.[3]

See also[edit source | edit]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ "Flex Map Viewer". Missouri Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 11, 2012. 
  2. ^ Google Inc. Google Maps – Overview Map of Route 110 (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=I-90+E%2FI-94+E&daddr=41.219986,-90.324097+to:I-72+W&hl=en&geocode=FQr5fgIddaLG-g%3B%3BFZUVXgIdQP2N-g&mra=dpe&mrcr=0&mrsp=1&sz=8&via=1&sll=40.472024,-89.769287&sspn=4.082302,8.453979&ie=UTF8&ll=40.123241,-90.977783&spn=1.025937,2.113495&z=10. Retrieved August 19, 2010.
  3. ^ a b Pyke, Marni (October 2, 2010). "Route 110 designation for Chicago to Kansas City expressway". Daily Herald. Retrieved 2011-01-12. 
  4. ^ http://www.whig.com%2Fstory%2F16448520%2Fmissouri-agrees-to-install-full-package-of-chicago-to-kansas-city-expressway-signs-clearing-the-way-for-promotion-of-the-route&ei=1uANT-DMAunL0QG667CKBg&usg=AFQjCNEVEElymrNL_hcDKYKVC7J9kE5U3w
  5. ^ Current Events. Kansas City Southern Railway. 1914. 
  6. ^ a b Wilson, Doug (2010-06-30). "Chicago-Kansas City Expressway a reality after six-decade effort". Quincy Herald Whig. Retrieved 2010-08-19. 
  7. ^ a b "Chicago-Kansas City Expressway corridor becomes a reality". Daily Gate City (Keokuk, IA). 2010-07-01. Retrieved 2010-08-19. 
  8. ^ Krasnowski, Matt (1989-12-22). "Chicago-Kansas City Expresway Cost Set At $2.5 Billion". The State Journal-Register (Springfield, IL). Retrieved 2010-08-19. 
  9. ^ "Senate Joint Resolution 118". 2010-05-27. Retrieved 2010-08-19. , 96th Illinois General Assembly.
  10. ^ Hilkevitch, John (2010-08-22). "Getting Around: By the numbers". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 2010-08-23. [dead link]
  11. ^ WGEM. "Connecting Quincy to the Country". WGEM. 
  12. ^ Hilkevitch, John (August 22, 2010). "Getting Around: Chicago-K.C. corridor ready to roll". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved August 23, 2010. [dead link]
  13. ^ "Carlson, Rich. "Illinois Highways Page: Routes 101 thru 120". Retrieved August 19, 2010. "

External links[edit source | edit]