IFTTT

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IFTTT
IFTTT Logo.svg
Web addressifttt.com
SloganPut the Internet to work for you.
Type of sitePlatform
Available inEnglish
LaunchedDecember 14, 2010; 3 years ago (2010-12-14)
Current statusActive
 
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IFTTT
IFTTT Logo.svg
Web addressifttt.com
SloganPut the Internet to work for you.
Type of sitePlatform
Available inEnglish
LaunchedDecember 14, 2010; 3 years ago (2010-12-14)
Current statusActive

IFTTT (pronunciation: "ift" as in "gift"[1] short for "If This Then That") is a service that enables users to connect different web applications (e.g., Facebook, Evernote, Weather, Dropbox, etc.) together through simple conditional statements known as "Recipes". IFTTT was developed by Linden Tibbets[2] and launched in 2010.[3]

General[edit]

IFTTT enables users to create and share "Recipes" that fit the statement: "if this then that".[1] The “this” part of a Recipe is called a Trigger. Some example Triggers are “I’m tagged in a photo on Facebook” or “I check in on Foursquare”. The “that” part of a Recipe is called an Action. Some example Actions are “send me a text message” or “create a status message on Facebook”. The combination of a Trigger and an Action from a user's active channels are called Recipes.[4] The service offers Triggers and Actions for 121 channels,[5] such as Twitter, Foursquare, Flickr, and Box.[6] In June 2012, the service entered the Internet of Things space by integrating with Belkin WeMo devices,[7] allowing Recipes to interact with the physical world. By combining IFTTT with other services such as Yahoo! Pipes, one can build elaborate systems that enable easier consumption of content from a variety of sources.[8]

Platforms[edit]

In addition to its default web-based application, IFTTT released a version of the service for iPhone in July 2013. IFTTT for iPhone adds three exclusive channels: iOS Photos, Reminders and Contacts.[9] An Android version of the app was released on April 24, 2014.[10]

Reception[edit]

IFTTT has been praised by Forbes,[11] Time,[12] Wired,[13] The New York Times,[14] and Reader's Digest.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "About IFTTT". Retrieved 25 June 2013. 
  2. ^ Quora Community (January 23, 2012). "IFTTT: Who is the team behind ifttt.com?". Retrieved August 8, 2012. 
  3. ^ Tibbets, Linden (December 14, 2010). "ifttt the beginning...". Retrieved November 13, 2012. 
  4. ^ Pash, Adam (January 4, 2012). "How to Supercharge All Your Favorite Webapps with ifttt". Lifehacker. Retrieved September 21, 2011. 
  5. ^ https://ifttt.com/channels
  6. ^ Williams, Alex (July 24, 2012). "IFTTT Adds Box And Plans New Channel Platform Intended To Connect Business Apps". Techcrunch. Retrieved July 25, 2012. 
  7. ^ Panzarino, Matthew (June 20, 2012). "Task automation tool IFTTT gets new look, moves into physical world with Belkin WeMo compatibility". Retrieved July 25, 2012. 
  8. ^ Westfall, Jon (October 23, 2012). "Create Your Own Magazine With IFTTT, Pocket, And Yahoo! Pipes". JonWestfall.Com. 
  9. ^ Hamburger, Ellis (July 11, 2013). "IFTTT brings automation to the iPhone". Retrieved November 7, 2013. 
  10. ^ Panzarino, Matthew (April 24, 2014). "Internet Glue Service IFTTT Launches on Android With Deeper Integration Than iOS". Retrieved April 25, 2014. 
  11. ^ Ackerman, Elise (September 23, 2012). "IFTTT: San Francisco Startup Lets Anyone Control The Internet of Things". Forbes. Retrieved November 13, 2012. 
  12. ^ McCracken, Harry (September 18, 2012). "50 Best Websites 2012". Time. Retrieved November 13, 2012. 
  13. ^ Flaherty, Joseph (October 13, 2012). "Socks Are the New Hoodie: A Startup Reinvents Swag". Wired. Retrieved November 13, 2012. 
  14. ^ Wortham, Jenna (September 23, 2011). "A Web Tool That Lets You Automate the Internet". The New York Times. Retrieved November 13, 2012. 
  15. ^ Beres, Damon. "The IFTTT Recipes that Will Make Your Life Better". Retrieved March 10, 2014. 

External links[edit]