If You Want Me to Stay

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"If You Want Me to Stay"
Single by Sly and the Family Stone
from the album Fresh
Released1973
Format7" single
Recorded1973
GenreFunk
Length3:01 / 2:40 (alternate take)
LabelEpic
11017
Writer(s)Sly Stone
ProducerSly Stone
Sly and the Family Stone singles chronology
"(You Caught Me) Smilin'"
(1972)
"If You Want Me to Stay"
(1973)
"Frisky"
(1973)
 
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"If You Want Me to Stay"
Single by Sly and the Family Stone
from the album Fresh
Released1973
Format7" single
Recorded1973
GenreFunk
Length3:01 / 2:40 (alternate take)
LabelEpic
11017
Writer(s)Sly Stone
ProducerSly Stone
Sly and the Family Stone singles chronology
"(You Caught Me) Smilin'"
(1972)
"If You Want Me to Stay"
(1973)
"Frisky"
(1973)

"If You Want Me to Stay" is a 1973 hit single by Sly and the Family Stone, from their album Fresh. The single was the band's final Top 20 pop hit, and is the best-known of its post-There's a Riot Goin' On recordings.

Stone recorded the song without much input from the rest of the band; by the early 1970s, he had begun crafting most of his material by himself. An alternate version of "If You Want Me to Stay", as well as most of the rest of the Fresh album, was completed before Stone decided to scrap the masters and re-record the album. These alternate versions have surfaced in underground markets, online auctions, and specialty shops. However, in Epic's 2007 reissue of Fresh, five bonus tracks are included, all of which are directly from the alternate mix of the album.

"If You Want Me to Stay" reached number 12 on the Pop Chart, and number-three on the Billboard R&B Singles Chart.

Song analysis[edit]

The lyrics of "If You Want Me to Stay" feature frontman Sly Stone informing his lover that she has to let him be himself, otherwise he feels that he would have to leave. The composition has its origins in an apology Stone wrote to his future wife, Kathleen Silva, after a fight.

Personnel[edit]

Note: A transcription of the bass part for this song appears in the October 2006 issue of Bass Player magazine (pages 78–81). According to the article accompanying the transcription, written by Chris Jisi:

"The ambitiously named 'Fresh' hit the streets in early July. A stripped-down, more raw outing than previous Sly albums, the 11-track set was boosted by the bass waves of Graham's hand-picked replacement, Rustee Allen. Sly himself laid down some of the album's bass tracks, but it was Rustee whose lilting line drove "If You Want Me To Stay," the disc's hit single (No. 12 on the Pop charts, No. 3 on R & B)"

Cover versions[edit]

The song has been covered extensively since its introduction, by artists including Etta James, Eric Benet, Mercury Rev, Victor Wooten, Soulive, Pama International, and Kermit Ruffins. The song has also been featured in the movies Made in Heaven, Talk to Me, Dead Presidents, and Money Talks.

Prince recorded a version of "If You Want Me to Stay" for his 2002 live album, One Nite Alone... Live!.

Red Hot Chili Peppers recorded a cover of this song for their 1985 album Freaky Styley.

In 2006, bassist Wayman Tisdale released an album entitled Way Up! which contained a cover of this song.[1]

Songplay[edit]

The song was used in the closing minutes of the series finale of the TV show "Medium" (which aired on January 21, 2011) as the actors said their goodbyes to the camera.

It was also featured in the opening scene of the ER episode entitled "John Carter M.D." Malik McGrath played it on the radio much to Weaver's dismay.

Sample[edit]

Dre' Dog, aka Andre Nickatina sampled the song's bass line in his 1991 album The New Jim Jones in the song "Chocolate Thai".

Dana Dane sampled the song's from the 1990 album Dana Dane 4 Ever in the song "Tales from the Dane Side".

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References[edit]