I Will Follow Him

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"I Will Follow Him"

German edition picture sleeve
Single by Little Peggy March
from the album I Will Follow Him
B-side"Wind Up Doll"
ReleasedMarch 1963
GenrePop
Length2:24
LabelRCA Victor
Writer(s)Music: Franck Pourcel, Paul Mauriat, arr. Arthur Altman
Lyrics: Norman Gimbel (transl.), Jacques Plante (original)
Producer(s)Hugo & Luigi, Arranged by Sammy Lowe
Little Peggy March singles chronology
"Little Me"
(1962)
"I Will Follow Him"
(1963)
"I Wish I Were a Princess"
(1963)
 
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"I Will Follow Him"

German edition picture sleeve
Single by Little Peggy March
from the album I Will Follow Him
B-side"Wind Up Doll"
ReleasedMarch 1963
GenrePop
Length2:24
LabelRCA Victor
Writer(s)Music: Franck Pourcel, Paul Mauriat, arr. Arthur Altman
Lyrics: Norman Gimbel (transl.), Jacques Plante (original)
Producer(s)Hugo & Luigi, Arranged by Sammy Lowe
Little Peggy March singles chronology
"Little Me"
(1962)
"I Will Follow Him"
(1963)
"I Wish I Were a Princess"
(1963)

"I Will Follow Him", first recorded by Paola Neri, is also a song recorded by Little Peggy March in 1963. The music was written by Franck Pourcel (using the pseudonym J.W. Stole) and Paul Mauriat (using the pseudonym Del Roma). It was adapted by Arthur Altman. The English lyrics were translated by Norman Gimbel.[1]

The song is a translation of the French language tune "Chariot" (lyrics by Jacques Plante) recorded a year earlier by Petula Clark, which hit #1 in France and #8 in Belgium and earned Clark a gold record (Clark's Italian ("Sul Mio Carro"; #4) and German ("Cheerio"; #6) recordings of the song were also major hits). Her English version, released by Pye in the UK and by Laurie in the USA was no success.

In Italy three versions of the song were in the charts (translated/adapted by Vito Pallavicini and Bruno Pallesi): One recorded by Betty Curtis (highest position: #3), another version by Petula Clark (#4) and the Franck Pourcel version (#5)[2]

In 1994, the Spanish singer Raphael released a Spanish version of the song titled "La Tierra" (meaning 'The Earth'). Raphael performed the song in his tours with remarkable success until 1999.

Song history[edit]

The song was recorded in 1961 by Franck Pourcel and began as an instrumental piece appearing on the 1961 European LP release: "Amour, Danse, Et Violons. No.17." At the same time, it appeared on the EP release: "La Voix de son Maître." Pourcel co-wrote the song with his friend and fellow French bandleader Paul Mauriat. The other French bandleader Raymond Lefèvre has been credited for arrangements. Franck Pourcel's original recording was popular on MOR, or "easy listening," stations. Mauriat later recorded an instrumental version in 1976 with a disco beat, using Moog synthesizer.

The English version by March, backed with "Wind Up Doll," was released by RCA Victor and hit #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 on April 27, 1963, making 15-year-old March the youngest female artist to have a U.S. chart-topping single. Her version also made it to #1 on the soul singles chart.[3]

The Peggy March version of the song is featured prominently & humorously in Kenneth Anger's famous 1963 experimental film "Scorpio Rising." Its use underscores one of the film's central themes: that both Christianity and Fascism require followers that blindly and obsessively follow the ideology of their leaders, leading to violence and death.

In 1982 the Dutch singer José Hoebee (former member of the girl band Luv') made a hit cover of the song.

The song is featured at the end of the 1992 film Sister Act, where it was performed by the nuns' chorus for the Pope.

The song's chorus was parodied in the Eminem/Dr. Dre song "Guilty Conscience", as "these voices, these voices, I hear them, and where they go I'll follow, I'll follow, I'll follow, I'll follow".

The song's bassline was used extensively by Japanese psychedelic rock band Les Rallizes Dénudés in their song 'Night of the Assassins'. [4]

The Cartoon Network television show The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack used a modified version of the song for the season one episode Lead 'Em and Weep, changing the song from "I Will Follow Him" to "He Will Follow Me."

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
"He's So Fine" by The Chiffons
Billboard Hot 100 number one single
(Little Peggy March version)

April 27, 1963 (three weeks)
Succeeded by
"If You Wanna Be Happy" by Jimmy Soul
Preceded by
"Baby Workout" by Jackie Wilson
Billboard Hot R&B Singles number-one single
(Little Peggy March version)

May 25, 1963 (one week)
Succeeded by
"If You Wanna Be Happy" by Jimmy Soul