I Dream of You (More Than You Dream I Do)

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"I Dream of You (More Than You Dream I Do)" is a popular song.

It was written by Marjorie Goetschius and Edna Osser and published in 1944.

Charted versions were recorded by Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra, by Andy Russell, by Frank Sinatra, and by Perry Como.

The recording by Tommy Dorsey was made on November 14, 1944 and released by RCA Victor Records as catalog number 20-1608.[1] It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on December 28, 1944 and lasted 8 weeks on the chart, peaking at #4.[2] The flip side of this recording was also a big hit, "Opus No. 1."

The recording by Andy Russell was released by Capitol Records as catalog number 175.[3] It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on December 21, 1944 and lasted 3 weeks on the chart, peaking at #5.[2] The flip side of this recording was "Magic Is the Moonlight."

The recording by Frank Sinatra was made on December 1, 1944, released by Columbia Records as catalog number 36762[4]). It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on January 18, 1945 and lasted 4 weeks on the chart, peaking at #7.[2] This recording was a two-sided hit; the flip side of this recording was "Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)."

The recording by Perry Como was made on December 8, 1944 and released by RCA Victor Records as catalog number 20-1629.[1] It reached the Billboard magazine charts on January 18, 1945 and lasted 1 week on the chart, at #10.[2] The flip side of this recording was "I'm Confessin' (that I Love You)." This recording was also released in the United Kingdom by HMV with the catalog number BD-1165. The flip side of this recording was "If You Were the Only Girl (in the World)"

Other recorded versions[edit]

Other versions of the song have been recorded by Alma Cogan, by Doris Day and Les Brown's orchestra, by Archie Lewis and The Geraldo Strings, Jerry Lewis, and by Johnny Mathis.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b RCA Victor Records in the 20-1500 to 20-1999 series
  2. ^ a b c d Whitburn, Joel (1973). Top Pop Records 1940-1955. Record Research. 
  3. ^ Capitol Records in the 100 to 499 series
  4. ^ Columbia Records in the 36500 to 36999 series
  5. ^ Warwick Records in the 500 to 699 series
  6. ^ Capitol Records in the 2000 to 2499 series
  7. ^ Decca Records in the 18500 to 18999 series
  8. ^ Keystone transcription records in the 1 to 298 series
  9. ^ Hit Records in the 7000 to 7159 series
  10. ^ Kent Records listing
  11. ^ Fortune Records listing