ISFJ

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This article is about the Myers-Briggs personality type. For the Socionics ISFj, see Ethical Sensory Introvert.

ISFJ (Introversion, Sensing, Feeling, Judging) is an abbreviation used in the publications of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) to refer to one of sixteen personality types.[1] The MBTI assessment was developed from the work of prominent psychiatrist Carl G. Jung in his book Psychological Types. Jung proposed a psychological typology based on the theories of cognitive functions that he developed through his clinical observations.

From Jung's work, others developed psychological typologies. Jungian personality assessments include the MBTI assessment, developed by Isabel Briggs Myers and Katharine Cook Briggs, and the Keirsey Temperament Sorter, developed by David Keirsey. Keirsey referred to ISFJs as Protectors, one of the four types belonging to the temperament he called the Guardians.[2] ISFJs account for about 9–14% of the population.[3][4]

The MBTI instrument[edit]

The MBTI preferences indicate the differences in people based on the following:[5]

By using their preference in each of these areas, people develop what Jung and Myers called psychological type. This underlying personality pattern results from the dynamic interaction of their four preferences, in conjunction with environmental influences and their own individual tendencies. People are likely to develop behaviors, skills, and attitudes based on their particular type. Each personality type has its own potential strengths as well as areas that offer opportunities for growth.

The MBTI tool consists of multiple choice questions that sort respondents on the basis of the four "dichotomies" (pairs of psychological opposites). Sixteen different outcomes are possible, each identified by its own four-letter code, referred to by initial letters. (N is used for iNtuition, since I is used for Introversion). The MBTI is approximately 75% accurate according to its own manual.[6]

Characteristics[edit]

Myers-Briggs description[edit]

According to Myers-Briggs, ISFJs are interested in maintaining order and harmony in every aspect of their lives. They are steadfast and meticulous in handling their responsibilities. Although quiet, they are people-oriented and very observant. Not only do they remember details about others, but they observe and respect others’ feelings. Friends and family are likely to describe them as thoughtful and trustworthy.

Keirsey description[edit]

According to Keirsey, ISFJs, or "Protector Guardians", are most concerned with taking care of people by keeping them safe and secure. They are modest caretakers who do not demand credit or thanks for their efforts. But while they are essentially compassionate—and in fact exercise more patience in dealing with people with disabilities than perhaps any other type—their reluctance to open up to strangers can lead others to misread them as standoffish. Only among friends and family may this quiet type feel comfortable speaking freely. ISFJs are serious people with a strong work ethic, not inclined to self-indulgence. They believe in being meticulous and thrifty. They work well alone. While they may enjoy taking care of others, they do not enjoy giving orders.

Cognitive functions[edit]

A diagram of the cognitive functions of each type. A type's background color represents its Dominant function, and its text color represents its Auxiliary function.

Drawing upon Jungian theory, Isabel Myers proposed that for each personality type, the cognitive functions (sensing, intuition, thinking, and feeling) form a hierarchy. This hierarchy represents the person's default pattern of behavior.

The Dominant function is the personality type's preferred role, the one they feel most comfortable with. The secondary Auxiliary function serves to support and expand on the Dominant function. If the Dominant is an information gathering function (sensing or intuition), the Auxiliary is a decision making function (thinking or feeling), and vice versa. The Tertiary function is less developed than the Dominant and Auxiliary, but it matures over time, rounding out the person's abilities. The Inferior function is the personality type's Achilles's heel. This is the function they are least comfortable with. Like the Tertiary, the Inferior function strengthens with maturity.[11]

Jung and Myers considered the attitude of the Auxiliary, Tertiary, and Inferior functions to be the opposite of the Dominant. In this interpretation, if the Dominant function is extraverted, then the other three are introverted, and vice versa. However, many modern practitioners hold that the attitude of the Tertiary function is the same as the Dominant.[6] Using the more modern interpretation, the cognitive functions of the ISFJ are as follows:[11]

Dominant: Introverted sensing (Si)[edit]

Si collects data in the present moment and compares it with past experiences, a process that sometimes evokes the feelings associated with memory, as if the subject were reliving it. Seeking to protect what is familiar, Si draws upon history to form goals and expectations about what will happen in the future.[12]

Auxiliary: Extraverted feeling (Fe)[edit]

Fe seeks social connections and creates harmonious interactions through polite, considerate, and appropriate behavior. Fe responds to the explicit (and implicit) wants of others, and may even create an internal conflict between the subject’s own needs and the desire to meet the needs of others.[13]

Tertiary: Introverted thinking (Ti)[edit]

Ti seeks precision, such as the exact word to express an idea. It notices the minute distinctions that define the essence of things, then analyzes and classifies them. Ti examines all sides of an issue, looking to solve problems while minimizing effort and risk. It uses models to root out logical inconsistency.[14]

Inferior: Extraverted intuition (Ne)[edit]

Ne finds and interprets hidden meanings, using “what if” questions to explore alternatives, allowing multiple possibilities to coexist. This imaginative play weaves together insights and experiences from various sources to form a new whole, which can then become a catalyst to action.[15]

Shadow functions[edit]

Later personality researchers (notably Linda V. Berens)[16] added four additional functions to the descending hierarchy, the so-called "shadow" functions to which the individual is not naturally inclined but which can emerge when the person is under stress. For ISFJ these shadow functions are (in order):

Correlation with Enneatype[edit]

According to Baron and Wagele, the most common Enneatypes for ISFJs are Perfectionists, Helpers and Skeptics.[21]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Myers-Briggs Foundation: The 16 MBTI Types". Retrieved 2009-05-07. 
  2. ^ Temperament
  3. ^ "Keirsey.com Portrait of the Protector". Retrieved 10 January 2010. 
  4. ^ "CAPT". Retrieved 2008-10-13. 
  5. ^ Myers, Isabel Briggs (1998). Introduction to Type: A Guide to Understanding your Results on the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. Mountain View, CA: CPP, Inc. 
  6. ^ a b Myers, Isabel Briggs; Mary H. McCaulley (1985). Manual: A Guide to the Development and Use of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (in English) (2nd edition ed.). Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologist Press. p. 52. ISBN 0-89106-027-8. 
  7. ^ "Changing Minds: Extraversion vs. Introversion". Retrieved 2009-01-10. 
  8. ^ "Changing Minds: Sensing vs. Intuiting". Retrieved 2009-01-10. 
  9. ^ "Changing Minds: Thinking vs. Feeling". Retrieved 2009-01-10. 
  10. ^ "Changing Minds: Judging vs. Perceiving". Retrieved 2009-01-10. 
  11. ^ a b Barron-Tieger, Barbara; Tieger, Paul D. (1995). Do what you are: discover the perfect career for you through the secrets of personality type. Boston: Little, Brown. ISBN 0-316-84522-1. 
  12. ^ "Cognitive Processes: Introverted sensing". Retrieved 2009-05-12. 
  13. ^ "Cognitive Processes: Extraverted Feeling". Retrieved 2009-05-12. 
  14. ^ "Cognitive Processes: Introverted thinking". Retrieved 2009-05-12. 
  15. ^ "Cognitive Processes: Extraverted intuition". Retrieved 2009-05-12. 
  16. ^ "CognitiveProcesses.com". Retrieved 2008-05-21. 
  17. ^ "Cognitive Processes: Extraverted Sensing". Retrieved 2009-05-12. 
  18. ^ "Cognitive Processes: Introverted feeling". Retrieved 2009-05-12. 
  19. ^ "Cognitive Processes: Extraverted thinking". Retrieved 2009-05-12. 
  20. ^ "Cognitive Processes: Introverted intuition". Retrieved 2009-05-12. 
  21. ^ * Wagele, Elizabeth; Renee Baron (1994). The Enneagram Made Easy. HarperOne. ISBN 0-06-251026-6. 

External links[edit]