I've Never Been to Me

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"I've Never Been to Me"
Single by Charlene
from the album Charlene and I've Never Been to Me
Released1977, 1982
Format7", CD single
Recorded1977
GenrePop
LabelMotown
Writer(s)Ron Miller, Kenneth Hirsch
Producer(s)Ron Miller, Don Costa, Berry Gordy
Charlene singles chronology
"Freddie"
(1977)
"I've Never Been to Me"
(1982)
"It Ain't Easy Comin' Down"
(1982)
iveneverbeentome.com
 
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"I've Never Been to Me"
Single by Charlene
from the album Charlene and I've Never Been to Me
Released1977, 1982
Format7", CD single
Recorded1977
GenrePop
LabelMotown
Writer(s)Ron Miller, Kenneth Hirsch
Producer(s)Ron Miller, Don Costa, Berry Gordy
Charlene singles chronology
"Freddie"
(1977)
"I've Never Been to Me"
(1982)
"It Ain't Easy Comin' Down"
(1982)
iveneverbeentome.com

"I've Never Been to Me" is the title of a ballad, written and composed by Ron Miller and Kenneth Hirsch, which is best known via a recording by American pop singer Charlene. Its original release in 1977 barely registered on the Billboard Hot 100 in the U.S., but its re-release in 1982 peaked at No. 3 and earned her a gold certification.[1] In addition, the song topped the charts in Canada, Australia, the United Kingdom[2] and Ireland.

Content[edit]

The song is best known as lyrically formatted for a female vocalist and as such is addressed to a desperate wife and mother who would like to trade her prosaic existence for the jet setting lifestyle the song's narrator has led. The narrator alludes to various hedonistic episodes in her life, concluding that while she's "been to paradise," she's ultimately failed to find self-fulfillment expressing this with the line, "I've never been to me." There is also an alternate set of lyrics for the song formatted for a male singer, in which the narrator is an elderly man, destined to die the very next day, begging for a dime for a cup of coffee, addressing a younger man who is "raising hell" the way the old man used to do.

Early versions[edit]

Charlene had recorded "I've Never Been to Me" in 1976 for her 1977 self-titled album release. Upon its September 1977 single release, "I've Never Been to Me" became Charlene's third consecutive single to stall in the lowest part of the Hot 100 in Billboard following "It Ain't Easy Coming Down" - also from the Charlene album - and Freddie whose respective Hot 100 peaks had been #97 and #96: the Hot 100 peak of "I've Never Been to Me" in its original release was #97 and while Charlene's precedent two singles had both reached Billboard's Easy Listening chart - "It Ain't Easy Coming Down" at #23, "Freddie" at #40 - "I've Never Been to Me" failed to appear on that chart.

The earliest version of "I've Never Been to Me" to be released was that by Randy Crawford which appeared on her 1976 album release Everything Must Change. Besides Charlene's version, 1977 also saw the release of versions of the song by Nancy Wilson and Walter Jackson: Nancy Wilson's version served as the title track of her June 1977 album release and was the first version of the song to be released as a single reaching #47 on the Billboard's R&B chart, while Walter Jackson's version - featuring the lyric formatted from a male perspective - was featured on his I Want To Come Back As A Song album released in the spring of 1977.

In February 1978 a mid-tempo recording of "I've Never Been to Me" by Mary McGregor was released as the advance single from her In Your Eyes album: this single reached #29 on Billboard's Easy Listening chart. Also in 1978 Marti Caine recorded "I've Never Been to Me" for her album release Behind the Smile from which it was issued as a single, and Mary Roos recorded the German rendering by lyricist Michael Kunze entitled "Doch mich selber kenn ich nicht" (But I do not know myself) for her album Maryland.

The hit revival of Charlene's version[edit]

In 1982 Scott Shannon, a disc jockey at Tampa radio station WRBQ, began playing the "I've Never Been to Me" track off the Charlene album, and response from local listeners was such as to motivate Shannon, a former Motown employee, to alert Motown president Jay Lasker to the track's hit potential. Lasker located Charlene who, discouraged by the poor performance of her 1977 Motown releases and by the label's decision not to release a second album she had recorded, had left the music industry and met and married an Englishman, subsequently accompanying him to his native land and taking a job at a candy store in Ilford. Lasker located Charlene and personally telephoned her with the invitation to re-sign with Motown Records to facilitate the re-release of her "I've Never Been To Me" single, which was done in the spring of 1982.

The Billboard Hot 100 dated March 6, 1982 showed "I've Never Been to Me" by Charlene debuting at #84 - thirteen notches higher than the peak of its 1977 original release - to ascend to the Top 40 in four weeks and subsequently rise as high as #3 on the Hot 100 dated May 22 1982. The track had even more chart impact internationally attaining #1 status in Australia (six weeks), Canada (four weeks), Ireland (three weeks) and the UK.[2] "I've Never Been to Me" also afforded Charlene a Top Ten hit in Belgium (Flemish Region) (#7), the Netherlands (#7), New Zealand (#5) and Norway (#5). In 1982 Charlene's "I've Never Been to Me" was also a hit on the Easy Listening Chart (#7) and a minor C&W chart crossover (#60).

As Charlene was unable to successfully follow up the success of "I've Never Been to Me" - her only subsequent Hot 100 entry "Used to Be" (a duet with Stevie Wonder) stalled outside the Top 40 at #46 - she remains a high-profile one-hit wonder: on the 2002 VH1 special 100 Greatest One-hit Wonders, "I've Never Been to Me" by Charlene was ranked at #75.[3]

A Spanish language recording of "I've Never Been to Me" entitled "Nunca He Ido A Mi" was recorded by Charlene and was one of two B-side tracks featured on the re-release of "It Ain't Easy Coming Down" - the followup to the 1982 release of "I've Never Been to Me" - in its UK format (in other territories "It Ain't Easy Coming Down" featured only the one B-side "If I Could See Myself").

Charlene re-released the song in the form of a dance remix via download music in 2008.

Preceded by
"Goody Two Shoes" by Adam Ant
UK number one single
26 June 1982
Succeeded by
"Happy Talk" by Captain Sensible
Preceded by
"Mickey" by Toni Basil
Australian Kent Music Report number-one single
June 21, 1982 - July 26, 1982 (6 weeks)
Succeeded by
"I Ran (So Far Away)" by A Flock of Seagulls
Preceded by
"Ebony and Ivory" by Paul McCartney and Stevie Wonder
Canadian RPM number-one single
25 June - 17 July 1982 (4 weeks)
Succeeded by
"Abracadabra" by Steve Miller

Subsequent versions in English[edit]

Subsequent versions in languages other than English[edit]

European[edit]

Asian[edit]

Parodies[edit]

Sampling[edit]

Live cover performances[edit]

Appearances / references in other media[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Billboard - Google Books". Books.google.com. 1982-12-25. Retrieved 2014-03-29. 
  2. ^ a b Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 410. ISBN 1-904994-10-5. 
  3. ^ "I've Never Been To Me enjoys a new release". Bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2012-08-08. 
  4. ^ "Almighty Records.com | Rainbow Nation feat. Monica Dionne | I've Never Been To Me". AlmightyRecords.com. 2010-10-27. Archived from the original on 2010-10-27. Retrieved 2012-08-08. 
  5. ^ "Information at Svensk mediedatabas". Smdb.kb.se. Retrieved 2012-08-08. 
  6. ^ Guterman, Jimmy and O'Donnell, Owen. The Worst Rock n' Roll Records Of All Time (Citadel Press, 1991.)
  7. ^ "Paul Anka wins worst song poll by CNN". UPI.com. 2006-04-27. Retrieved 2012-01-11. 

External links[edit]