I'm Not Like Everybody Else

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"I'm Not Like Everybody Else"
Single by The Kinks
A-side"Sunny Afternoon"
Released3 June 1966 (UK)
July 1966 (US)
Format7" single (45 RPM)
Recorded12 May 1966; Pye Studios (No.2), London
GenreRock
Length3:29
LabelPye 7N 17125 (UK)
Reprise 0497 (US)
Writer(s)Ray Davies
Producer(s)Shel Talmy
The Kinks singles chronology
"Dedicated Follower of Fashion"
(1966)
"Sunny Afternoon"/
"I'm Not Like Everybody Else"
(1966)
"Dead End Street"
(1966)
---
"Dandy"
(Non-UK, 1966)
 
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"I'm Not Like Everybody Else"
Single by The Kinks
A-side"Sunny Afternoon"
Released3 June 1966 (UK)
July 1966 (US)
Format7" single (45 RPM)
Recorded12 May 1966; Pye Studios (No.2), London
GenreRock
Length3:29
LabelPye 7N 17125 (UK)
Reprise 0497 (US)
Writer(s)Ray Davies
Producer(s)Shel Talmy
The Kinks singles chronology
"Dedicated Follower of Fashion"
(1966)
"Sunny Afternoon"/
"I'm Not Like Everybody Else"
(1966)
"Dead End Street"
(1966)
---
"Dandy"
(Non-UK, 1966)

"I'm Not Like Everybody Else" is a song written by Ray Davies and first recorded by The Kinks in 1966.

History[edit]

Davies had written the song for The Animals, but it was turned down, so the Kinks released their own version with guitarist Dave Davies on lead vocals. This went against the norm where each brother usually sang songs they had written themselves. Later performances of the song were sung by Ray, with Dave providing backing vocals and Eric Clapton influenced guitar solos. Both the Davies brothers continue to perform the song in their solo concerts.

Release and reception[edit]

The song was first released as the B-side to their single "Sunny Afternoon" but soon became a favourite and was often part of the Kinks live act. Ray Davies continues to play the song regularly and has been using the song as an opening number in his 2006-2008 solo live appearances.

The song has been included on many compilations including Sunny Afternoon in the UK in 1967, The Great Lost Kinks Album in the US in 1973 and the 2002 greatest hits release The Ultimate Collection. It also appears as a bonus track on the 1998 CD reissue of Face to Face and the 2011 deluxe edition of The Kink Kontroversy.

Influence and legacy[edit]

American rock band Everybody Else take their name from this song.[1]

The song has been covered by several bands. In 1968 it appeared the The Chocolate Watch Band's second full-length album The Inner Mystique.

The Finchley Boys covered the song on their 1972 album Everlasting Tributes.

Australian band Jimmy and the Boys and Swedish band The Nomads covered the song.

Chris Spedding recorded the song and used it as the title track for his 1980 album.

Camper Van Beethoven recorded a cover of The Chocolate Watch Band's version, true to their ironic style, covering a cover of a song about being unique. This version first appeared on their compilation album Camper Vantiquities in 1993.

Boss Hog covered the song for the soundtrack to Richard Linklater's 1996 film subUrbia

The Chesterfield Kings covered the song, which was included on their album "Where the Action Is." The Chesterfield Kings covered the Chocolate Watchband version.

Human Drama covered the song on their 1993 album Pinups, itself a tribute album to David Bowie's covers album Pin Ups.

The track, amongst many others, was reworked by the Kinks for their 1996 release To the Bone. This version featured in the Sopranos season five episode "Cold Cuts".[2]

An excerpt of the track has also been used as the base sound for an IBM worldwide TV campaign advertising personalized services.

The 1960s psychedelic garage band The Finchley Boys covered the song on their album Everlasting Tributes. [1]

The Sacred Mushroom also did a cover of this song on their self-titled release in 1969.[3]

The Kinks' To the Bone version was featured most recently in the Bobcat Goldthwait's 2011 movie God Bless America.

References[edit]

External links[edit]