Huron, South Dakota

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City of Huron, South Dakota
City
Motto: It's A Brand New Day
Location in Beadle County and the state of South Dakota
Coordinates: 44°21′33″N 98°13′5″W / 44.35917°N 98.21806°W / 44.35917; -98.21806Coordinates: 44°21′33″N 98°13′5″W / 44.35917°N 98.21806°W / 44.35917; -98.21806
CountryUnited States
StateSouth Dakota
CountyBeadle
Incorporated1883[1]
Government
 • TypeCommissioner Form
 • MayorPaul Aylward (D)
Area[2]
 • Total10.57 sq mi (27.38 km2)
 • Land9.48 sq mi (24.55 km2)
 • Water1.09 sq mi (2.82 km2)
Elevation1,280 ft (390 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total12,592
 • Estimate (2012[4])12,867
 • Density1,328.3/sq mi (512.9/km2)
Time zoneCST (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST)CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code57350 and 57399
Area code(s)605
FIPS code46-31060[5]
GNIS feature ID1255722[6]
Websitewww.huronsd.com
 
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City of Huron, South Dakota
City
Motto: It's A Brand New Day
Location in Beadle County and the state of South Dakota
Coordinates: 44°21′33″N 98°13′5″W / 44.35917°N 98.21806°W / 44.35917; -98.21806Coordinates: 44°21′33″N 98°13′5″W / 44.35917°N 98.21806°W / 44.35917; -98.21806
CountryUnited States
StateSouth Dakota
CountyBeadle
Incorporated1883[1]
Government
 • TypeCommissioner Form
 • MayorPaul Aylward (D)
Area[2]
 • Total10.57 sq mi (27.38 km2)
 • Land9.48 sq mi (24.55 km2)
 • Water1.09 sq mi (2.82 km2)
Elevation1,280 ft (390 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total12,592
 • Estimate (2012[4])12,867
 • Density1,328.3/sq mi (512.9/km2)
Time zoneCST (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST)CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code57350 and 57399
Area code(s)605
FIPS code46-31060[5]
GNIS feature ID1255722[6]
Websitewww.huronsd.com

Huron is a city in Beadle County, South Dakota, United States. The population was 12,592 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Beadle County.[7] Huron was the home of now-defunct Huron University (known in its later years as Si Tanka University) since 1897. Huron is also the home of the South Dakota State Fair. The Huron Plainsman, also referred to as the Plainsman, is the newspaper. The city was named after the Huron Indians.[1] It is currently the ninth largest city in the state of South Dakota, but it used to be the fourth.[8]

Huron is home to the South Dakota State Fair, which is held 6 days before Labor Day

Huron is home to a statue known as "The World's Largest Ringnecked Pheasant. "[9] Which has been refurbished in the Summer of 2011.

Huron is serviced by the Huron Police Department.

Geography and climate[edit]

Downtown Huron

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 10.57 square miles (27.38 km2), of which, 9.48 square miles (24.55 km2) is land and 1.09 square miles (2.82 km2) is water.[2]

Huron has been assigned the ZIP codes 57350 and 57399 and the FIPS place code 31060.

Huron experiences a humid continental climate (Köppen Dfa), which is characterized by hot, relatively humid summers and cold, dry winters, and is located in USDA Hardiness Zones 4.[10] The monthly daily average temperature ranges from 16.7 °F (−8.5 °C) in January to 73.7 °F (23.2 °C) in July, while there are 2.3 days of 100 °F (38 °C)+ highs, 25 days of 90 °F (32 °C)+ highs and 27 days with sub-0 °F (−18 °C) lows annually. Snowfall occurs mostly in light to moderate amounts during the winter, totaling 44.8 inches (114 cm); March is on average the snowiest month of the year. Precipitation, at 23 inches (584 mm) annually, is concentrated in the warmer months. Extremes range from −43 °F (−42 °C) as recently as January 12, 1912 to 112 °F (44 °C) on July 10, 1966.

Climate data for Huron, South Dakota (Airport), 1981−2010 normals
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)65
(18)
71
(22)
89
(32)
97
(36)
106
(41)
109
(43)
112
(44)
110
(43)
106
(41)
102
(39)
86
(30)
71
(22)
112
(44)
Average high °F (°C)26.8
(−2.9)
31.8
(−0.1)
43.7
(6.5)
59.0
(15)
70.2
(21.2)
79.6
(26.4)
86.0
(30)
84.0
(28.9)
74.7
(23.7)
60.4
(15.8)
43.0
(6.1)
29.0
(−1.7)
57.5
(14.2)
Average low °F (°C)6.6
(−14.1)
11.4
(−11.4)
22.6
(−5.2)
34.0
(1.1)
46.0
(7.8)
55.9
(13.3)
61.4
(16.3)
59.2
(15.1)
48.8
(9.3)
35.4
(1.9)
22.2
(−5.4)
9.5
(−12.5)
34.5
(1.4)
Record low °F (°C)−43
(−42)
−41
(−41)
−25
(−32)
−2
(−19)
17
(−8)
31
(−1)
37
(3)
33
(1)
18
(−8)
−6
(−21)
−28
(−33)
−34
(−37)
−43
(−42)
Precipitation inches (mm).50
(12.7)
.61
(15.5)
1.52
(38.6)
2.31
(58.7)
3.11
(79)
3.93
(99.8)
2.92
(74.2)
2.43
(61.7)
2.48
(63)
1.79
(45.5)
.92
(23.4)
.53
(13.5)
23.04
(585.2)
Snowfall inches (cm)7.7
(19.6)
7.9
(20.1)
8.9
(22.6)
4.1
(10.4)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
1.1
(2.8)
7.1
(18)
8.1
(20.6)
44.8
(113.8)
Avg. precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in)5.66.27.58.711.011.28.87.67.57.05.75.992.8
Avg. snowy days (≥ 0.1 in)6.46.14.72.1000000.64.16.630.6
Mean monthly sunshine hours179.8183.7229.4252.0306.9333.0362.7328.6258.0217.0153.0142.62,946.7
Source: NOAA (extremes 1893−present),[11][12] HKO (sun only 1961−1990)[13] The Weather Channel (records),[14]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880164
18903,0381,752.4%
19002,793−8.1%
19105,791107.3%
19208,30243.4%
193010,94631.8%
194010,843−0.9%
195012,78817.9%
196014,18010.9%
197014,2990.8%
198013,000−9.1%
199012,448−4.2%
200011,893−4.5%
201012,5925.9%
Est. 201212,8672.2%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 12,592 people, 5,418 households, and 3,179 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,328.3 inhabitants per square mile (512.9 /km2). There were 6,023 housing units at an average density of 635.3 per square mile (245.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 86.9% White, 1.0% African American, 1.2% Native American, 4.9% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 3.9% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.8% of the population.

There were 5,418 households of which 28.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.4% were married couples living together, 9.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 41.3% were non-families. 36.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 15% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.94.

The median age in the city was 39.8 years. 24.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.8% were from 25 to 44; 26.4% were from 45 to 64; and 17.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.4% male and 50.6% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 11,893 people, 5,263 households, and 3,047 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,448.5 people per square mile (559.3/km²). There were 5,872 housing units at an average density of 715.2 per square mile (276.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 95.92% White, 0.96% African American, 1.29% Native American, 0.42% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.35% from other races, and 1.03% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.20% of the population.

There were 5,263 households out of which 26.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.6% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 42.1% were non-families. 37.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.18 and the average family size was 2.86.

As of 2000 the median income for a household in the city was $29,097. Males had a median income of $27,027 versus $19,921 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,275.

Government[edit]

The City of Huron's type of government is Commissioner Form. Under the Commissioner Form of government the board of commissioners consists of a mayor and four commissioners, who are all elected at large for a three-year term. The commission has control over all departments of the city and can make and enforce rules and regulations which it may see fit for the organization, management, and operation of the departments of the city. Responsibilities are divided into the following areas: Public Safety Commissioner, Public Works Commissioner, Utilities Commissioner, and Finance Commissioner with each commissioner having oversight in each respective area.

History[edit]

Huron, located in east central South Dakota, is a result of railroad and land booms in the 1880s. The early history of the town is closely linked with the Chicago and Northwestern Railway. At the direction of Marvin Hughitt, General Manager of the Railroad, the west bank of the James River was selected as the division headquarters of the railroad. The company gained title to 880 acres (3.6 km2) of land at that location. Huron was named for the Huron Indians. Exactly who gave it the name was never established, apparently either Marvin Hughitt or someone in the Chicago office of the C&NW railroad company.

The original plat covered 11 blocks from 1st Street to 3rd Street and from Iowa Avenue SE to Ohio Avenue SW. Huron’s first settler was John Cain, a practical printer from Troy, New York. He learned in Chicago, from the railroad people, that they would have their chief town and operating headquarters at their James River crossing.

From 1880 until the capital was permanently located at Pierre in 1904, Huron was in the thick of the fight for the honor of being the capital city. Campbell and Winter Parks are the only remaining properties that were once designated capital grounds. Located between the two parks, Victorian houses originally built around 1906 occupy the city block on the land originally slated for the capitol building.

The site of the South Dakota State Fair is in Huron. Huron is the home to a handful of celebrities. Cheryl Ladd is one of the original "Charlie's Angels". Gladys Pyle was the first female member of the House of Representatives and the first Republican woman in the US Senate. Hubert H. Humphrey was the Democratic nominee for President in 1968 and served as Vice President under Lyndon B. Johnson.

Notable people[edit]

Education[edit]

The Huron School District has four public elementary schools, one middle school, and one high school. Huron High School's mascot is the "Tigers".

The principal of the Huron High School is Demetria Moon as of 2011-12 school year

It was the home of Si Tanka University (formerly Huron College) from 1983-2005.

Huron is also home to a Catholic elementary school called Holy Trinity School, and a private Christian school on the north side of town called James Valley Christian School.

http://www.huron.k12.sd.us/education/district/district.php?sectionid=1

Entertainment[edit]

After the Si Tanka University closed, the city bought the Fine Arts Center and operates it as a theater of the community.

In 2005, The Huron Event Center was opened connecting the Arena and the Crossroads, a local hotel; the event center is owned by the city. The State Fair is at the South Dakota State Fair Speedway.

In 2012, the city government started to build a new water park on the property that Huron University (Si Tanka) once occupied.

Media[edit]

AM Radio[edit]

AM radio stations
FrequencyCall signNameFormatOwnerCity
1210 AMKOKKDakota CountryCountryDakota CommunicationsHuron
1340 AMKIJVTiger 95Hot ACDakota CommunicationsHuron

FM Radio[edit]

FM radio stations
FrequencyCall signNameFormatOwnerTarget city/marketCity of license
88.7 FMKVCHVCY AmericaChristianVCY AmericaHuronHuron
88.7 FMK213CLSouth Dakota Public BroadcastingNPRSD Board of Directors for Educational TelecommunicationsHuronHuron
90.5 FMK213CLMoody RadioChristian
WJSO translator
Moody Bible InstituteHuronHuron
93.3 FMKJRVBig Jim 93.3Classic RockDakota CommunicationsHuron/MitchellWessington Springs
105.1 FMKZKK105.1 The EagleCountryDakota CommunicationsHuronHuron
89.7 FMK-LOVEK-LOVEChristianEducational Media FoundationHuronRocklin, California
95.3 FMKIJVTiger 95Hot AC
KIJV-AM translator
Dakota CommunicationsHuronHuron

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "History". City of Huron. Retrieved 2008-10-14. 
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-06-21. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-06-21. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-29. 
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  8. ^ http://www.geonames.org/US/SD/largest-cities-in-south-dakota.html
  9. ^ Brown, Greg; Jocelyn Sloan, Uther Draken (2005-07-24). "Huron, South Dakota - World's Largest Pheasant". RoadsideAmerica.com. Retrieved 2007-10-19. 
  10. ^ [1]
  11. ^ "Station Name: SD HURON RGNL AP". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2013-03-11. 
  12. ^ "NOWData - NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2013-02-18. 
  13. ^ "Climatological Normals of Huron". Hong Kong Observatory. Retrieved 2011-10-28. 
  14. ^ "Monthly Averages for Huron, SD". The Weather Channel. Retrieved 2011-10-28. 
  15. ^ "Raymond Johnson named to Wyoming Aviation Hall of Fame, September 23, 2013". Retrieved September 26, 2013. 

External links[edit]