HubPages

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HubPages
TypeWeb publishing
IndustryInternet
Founded2006
HeadquartersSan Francisco, CA, USA
Key people

Paul Edmondson, Founder and CEO.
Jay Reitz, Founder and VP of Engineering

Paul Deeds, Founder and General Manager
Employees24
Websitehubpages.com
 
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HubPages
TypeWeb publishing
IndustryInternet
Founded2006
HeadquartersSan Francisco, CA, USA
Key people

Paul Edmondson, Founder and CEO.
Jay Reitz, Founder and VP of Engineering

Paul Deeds, Founder and General Manager
Employees24
Websitehubpages.com

HubPages is a user generated content, revenue-sharing website.[1]

Contents

History

The site launched in August 2006 funded by a $2 million investment from Hummer Winblad.[2] According to Quantcast, HubPages has become one of the 50 most visited US sites on the Internet. In December 2010, it received around 42 million visits and over 90 million page views [3], which, according to the site, were across over 1 million Hubs published by more than 200,000 published users.

In May 2010, HubPages was recognized as one of the “2010 Hottest Silicon Valley Companies” by Lead411.[4]Scott Goebel was once the leading controller of the company, before selling to re-locate to Las Vegas, NV.

Structure

HubPages is a social content community for writers. Members (known as "Hubbers") are given their own free sub-domain, where they can post magazine-style articles (referred to as Hubs). Hubbers are encouraged to enrich their text by embedding videos, external links, reader surveys, photos and maps, and providing a comments box for reader feedback.

Hubbers retain all intellectual property rights to their Hubs and can delete them at any time.

Hubbers earn revenue through advertising on their Hubs, including HubPages' own Advertising Program, Google AdSense, eBay and Amazon.com. The AdSense and eBay earnings accumulate along with your HubPages Ad Program earnings which helps to reach payout faster.

Previously, Hubbers had to join each of these affiliate schemes individually, but by early 2012 all revenue-sharing channels will be consolidated into the HubPages Earnings Program. Hubbers will still require AdSense account in order to join this Program. The 60:40 revenue split is achieved by alternating the code used in advertisements: the Hubber's code is displayed 60% of the time, and HubPages' code 40%.

A Hub is typically a discrete magazine-style article, longer than a blog post and covering a specific subject in some depth (usually 400 to 1,500 words). A Hub is not continually added to over time like a blog (although Hubbers often "tweak" Hubs to improve their earning capacity or to update information.) A Hubber who wished to write several posts about a single subject would be more likely to write separate Hubs and interlink them using the "Group" feature.[5]

To help people improve their online writing skills, HubPages offer a Learning Center, contests, HubChallenges, and the Weekly Topic Inspiration program. In addition, HubPages offers an in-depth approach to learning with the Apprenticeship Program. The Apprenticeship Program is a six-month course that aims to help users create a strong online portfolio.

Hubbers also benefit from the many comments that can be posted on their hubs by anyone who visits each individual hub, thus giving them a sense of what others think of their writing and subject knowledge. However, hubbers have the option to moderate all comments made on their hubs before they become visible. Members also have the ability to close the comments section on their hubs.

Writers on the site can also greatly benefit from the forums section where many questions, answers and concerns are shared by the community.

References

External links

Case Study"]. http://code.google.com/apis/adsense/docs/casestudies/hubpages.html. Retrieved 8 April 2008.