Horex

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Horex / HOREX GmbH
FateTaken over / -
Successor(s)Daimler-Benz / -
Founded1920 / 2010
Defunct1960 / -
HeadquartersBad Homburg / Garching, Germany
Productsmotorcycles, proprietary engines
ParentRex / -
Websitehttp://www.horex.com/
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Horex / HOREX GmbH
FateTaken over / -
Successor(s)Daimler-Benz / -
Founded1920 / 2010
Defunct1960 / -
HeadquartersBad Homburg / Garching, Germany
Productsmotorcycles, proprietary engines
ParentRex / -
Websitehttp://www.horex.com/
1926 Horex in the Deutsches Zweirad- und NSU-Museum Neckarsulm

Horex is a German motorcycle manufacturer. It was founded in 1920 by the Rex glassware company, which conflated Homburg and Rex to create the brand name. The headquarters was in Bad Homburg.

Horex built motorcycles with Columbus four-stroke engines from Oberursel. In 1925 Horex and Columbus merged. Horex developed a range of models with single-cylinder Columbus engines from 250 cc to 600 cc. In 1933 it added two parallel-twin models: the 600 cc S6 and 800 cc S8. Both twins have chain-driven OHC valvegear.

1955 Horex Imperator in the Deutsches Zweirad- und NSU-Museum Neckarsulm

World War II interrupted motorcycle production, but Horex resumed in 1948 with a 350 cc single-cylinder model, the SB 35 Regina. In 1951, Horex added a 500 cc OHC parallel-twin engine called the Imperator. In 1954 it added a 400 cc version of this twin to its range. In 1955, the company replaced the Regina with the Resident.

Daimler-Benz took over the company in 1960 and motorcycle production was terminated.

On June 15, 2010, it was announced that the brand would be revived and that a Horex motorcycle with a narrow-angle, six-cylinder supercharged engine would be available for sale in Germany, Austria and Switzerland at the end of the year 2011, with international sales to follow.[1] Besides the new VR6 supercharged engine, an aluminum bridge frame with a steel steering head forms the chassis. A single swing arm controls the rear wheel, while the engine power is transferred by a belt drive system.[2]

References[edit]

External links[edit]