Hopewell, New Jersey

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Hopewell, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Hopewell
Hopewell highlighted in Mercer County. Inset map: Mercer County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Hopewell, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°23′20″N 74°45′50″W / 40.389009°N 74.763861°W / 40.389009; -74.763861Coordinates: 40°23′20″N 74°45′50″W / 40.389009°N 74.763861°W / 40.389009; -74.763861[1][2]
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyMercer
IncorporatedApril 14, 1891
Government[5]
 • TypeBorough
 • MayorPaul Anzano (D, term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator / ClerkMichele Hovan[4]
Area[2]
 • Total0.703 sq mi (1.820 km2)
 • Land0.703 sq mi (1.820 km2)
 • Water0.000 sq mi (0.000 km2)  0.00%
Area rank530th of 566 in state
13th of 13 in county[2]
Elevation[6]197 ft (60 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total1,922
 • Estimate (2012[10])1,921
 • Rank489th of 566 in state
13th of 13 in county[11]
 • Density2,735.2/sq mi (1,056.1/km2)
 • Density rank228th of 566 in state
4th of 13 in county[11]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code08525[12][13]
Area code(s)609[14]
FIPS code3402133150[15][2]
GNIS feature ID885260[16][2]
Websitewww.hopewellboro-nj.us
 
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Hopewell, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Hopewell
Hopewell highlighted in Mercer County. Inset map: Mercer County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Hopewell, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°23′20″N 74°45′50″W / 40.389009°N 74.763861°W / 40.389009; -74.763861Coordinates: 40°23′20″N 74°45′50″W / 40.389009°N 74.763861°W / 40.389009; -74.763861[1][2]
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyMercer
IncorporatedApril 14, 1891
Government[5]
 • TypeBorough
 • MayorPaul Anzano (D, term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator / ClerkMichele Hovan[4]
Area[2]
 • Total0.703 sq mi (1.820 km2)
 • Land0.703 sq mi (1.820 km2)
 • Water0.000 sq mi (0.000 km2)  0.00%
Area rank530th of 566 in state
13th of 13 in county[2]
Elevation[6]197 ft (60 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total1,922
 • Estimate (2012[10])1,921
 • Rank489th of 566 in state
13th of 13 in county[11]
 • Density2,735.2/sq mi (1,056.1/km2)
 • Density rank228th of 566 in state
4th of 13 in county[11]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code08525[12][13]
Area code(s)609[14]
FIPS code3402133150[15][2]
GNIS feature ID885260[16][2]
Websitewww.hopewellboro-nj.us

Hopewell is a borough in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,922,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 113 (-5.6%) from the 2,035 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 67 (+3.4%) from the 1,968 counted in the 1990 Census.[17]

Hopewell was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 14, 1891, from portions of Hopewell Township, based on the results of a referendum held on March 21, 1891. Additional portions of Hopewell Township were annexed in 1915, and the borough was reincorporated in 1924.[18]

Geography[edit]

Hopewell Borough is located at 40°23′20″N 74°45′50″W / 40.389009°N 74.763861°W / 40.389009; -74.763861 (40.389009,-74.763861). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.703 square miles (1.820 km2), all of which was land.[1][2]

The borough is an independent municipality surrounded entirely by Hopewell Township.

Demographics[edit]

Historical populations
CensusPop.
1900980
19101,0739.5%
19201,33924.8%
19301,4679.6%
19401,67814.4%
19501,86911.4%
19601,9283.2%
19702,27117.8%
19802,001−11.9%
19901,968−1.6%
20002,0353.4%
20101,922−5.6%
Est. 20121,921[10]−0.1%
Population sources:1900-1920[19]
1900-1910[20] 1910-1930[21]
1930-1990[22] 2000[23][24] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 1,922 people, 778 households, and 532.2 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,735.2 inhabitants per square mile (1,056.1 /km2). There were 817 housing units at an average density of 1,162.7 per square mile (448.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 95.06% (1,827) White, 1.51% (29) Black or African American, 0.10% (2) Native American, 0.68% (13) Asian, 0.05% (1) Pacific Islander, 1.51% (29) from other races, and 1.09% (21) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.69% (71) of the population.[7]

There were 778 households of which 33.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.6% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.6% were non-families. 25.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.00.[7]

In the borough, 24.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 22.2% from 25 to 44, 36.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.8 years. For every 100 females there were 91.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.7 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $105,417 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,866) and the median family income was $125,066 (+/- $15,420). Males had a median income of $91,375 (+/- $14,302) versus $55,357 (+/- $11,473) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $50,910 (+/- $5,465). About 0.0% of families and 0.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.[25]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 2,035 people, 813 households, and 561 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,963.7 people per square mile (1,138.7/km2). There were 836 housing units at an average density of 1,217.5 per square mile (467.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 95.43% White, 1.08% African American, 0.49% Native American, 0.98% Asian, 1.23% from other races, and 0.79% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.31% of the population.[23][24]

There were 813 households out of which 36.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.0% were married couples living together, 11.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.9% were non-families. 25.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.01.[23][24]

In the borough the population was spread out with 26.1% under the age of 18, 4.7% from 18 to 24, 30.7% from 25 to 44, 27.9% from 45 to 64, and 10.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 94.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.3 males.[23][24]

The median income for a household in the borough was $77,270, and the median income for a family was $91,205. Males had a median income of $52,656 versus $47,315 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $38,413. None of the families and 2.1% of the population were living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and 5.2% of those over 64.[23][24]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Hopewell is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[5] All legislative powers of the Borough of Hopewell are exercised by the Borough Council. These powers can take the form of a resolution, ordinance or proclamation.[26]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Hopewell is Paul Anzano (D, term expires December 31, 2015). Members of the Borough Council are Council President David Knights (R, 2015), Deb Horowitz (D, 2015), Sean Jackson (D, 2013), Robert Lewis (R, 2014), David Mackie (D, 2013) and C. Schuyler Morehouse (R, 2014).[27][28]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Hopewell Borough is located in the 12th Congressional District[29] and is part of New Jersey's 15th state legislative district.[8][30][31]

New Jersey's Twelfth Congressional District is represented by Rush D. Holt, Jr. (D, Hopewell Township).[32] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[33][34] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[35][36]

The 15th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Shirley Turner (D, Lawrence Township, Mercer County) and in the General Assembly by Reed Gusciora (D, Trenton) and Bonnie Watson Coleman (D, Ewing Township).[37] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[38] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[39]

Mercer County is governed by a County Executive who oversees the day-to-day operations of the county and by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders that acts in a legislative capacity, setting policy.[40] As of 2013, the County Executive is Brian M. Hughes (D; term ends December 31, 2013, Princeton).[41] Members of the Board of Chosen Freeholders are elected at-large to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held each January, the board selects a Freeholder Chair and Vice-Chair from among its members.[42] Mercer County's freeholders are Freeholder Chair John Cimino (D; 2014, Hamilton Township)[43], Freeholder Vice Chair Andrew Koontz (D; 2013, Princeton),[44] Ann M. Cannon (D; 2015, East Windsor Township),[45] Anthony P. Carabelli (D; 2013, Trenton),[46] Pasqual "Pat" Colavita, Jr. (D; 2015, Lawrence Township),[47] Samuel T. Frisby (D; 2015; Trenton)[48] and Lucylle R. S. Walter (D; 2014, Ewing Township)[49][50] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Paula Sollami Covello (D, 2015).[51] Sheriff John A. "Jack" Kemler (D, 2014)[52] and Surrogate Dianne Gerofsky (D, 2016).[53][28]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,473 registered voters in Hopewell Borough, of which 664 (45.1%) were registered as Democrats, 264 (17.9%) were registered as Republicans and 544 (36.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party.[54]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 71.7% of the vote here (841 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 26.0% (305 votes) and other candidates with 1.3% (15 votes), among the 1,173 ballots cast by the borough's 1,493 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.6%.[55] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 65.0% of the vote here (789 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 32.6% (395 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (9 votes), among the 1,213 ballots cast by the borough's 1,437 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 84.4.[56]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 56.7% of the vote here (511 ballots cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 32.3% (291 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 10.0% (90 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (5 votes), among the 902 ballots cast by the borough's 1,466 registered voters, yielding a 61.5% turnout.[57]

Education[edit]

Public school students in kindergarten through twelfth grade attend the Hopewell Valley Regional School District, a comprehensive regional public school district serving students from Hopewell Borough, Hopewell Township and Pennington Borough.[58] Elementary school students from Hopewell Borough attend Hopewell Elementary School.

Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[59]) include four elementary schools — Bear Tavern Elementary School[60] (grades PreK-5; 469 students), Hopewell Elementary School[61] (PreK-5; 470), Stony Brook Elementary School[62] (K-5; 448) and Toll Gate Grammar School[63] (K-5; 307) — Timberlane Middle School[64] with 970 students in grades 6-8 and Hopewell Valley Central High School[65] with 1,203 students in grades 9 - 12.[66][67]

History[edit]

Colonial era[edit]

The first Colonial influence in Hopewell was the purchase of a 30,000-acre (120 km2) tract of land by Daniel Coxe a Royal British governor of West Jersey, in the latter half of the 17th century. All land in Hopewell can be traced back to this purchase.[68] In 1691 Coxe transferred his land to a company called The West Jersey Society of England, who intended to sell the land.[69] The society appointed an agent, Thomas Revell, to preside over the land and sell it to prospective buyers.[70] Revell then attracted settlers from New England, Long Island, and New Jersey with questionable incentives, saying that the land was fertile, and tame. However, the families that arrived in Hopewell only found vast stretches of wilderness.[71] The first settler in Hopewell Valley was Thomas Tindall who on November 10, 1699 bought a 300-acre (1.2 km2) tract of land from The West Jersey Society of England through Revell, for "ten pounds per hundred acres".[72] Other early settlers in Hopewell are said to be the Stouts, who immigrated from Holmdel to Hopewell in 1706.[73] Perhaps the first conflict between colonists in Hopewell was the dispute between Revell and the early inhabitants of Hopewell, who realized that their deeds were worthless due to Revell’s false claims. Fifty settlers then organized a class action lawsuit against Revell and the West Jersey Society. The long and arduous trial took place in Burlington, and eventually ruled against the settlers, who were forced to repurchase their land or relocate. Many settlers weren’t able to repay and moved north into North Jersey and New York.[74]

On April 23, 1715, the settlers who stayed in Hopewell, most notably the Stout family, organized the Old School Baptist Church, and what is now known as Hopewell was then referred to as "Baptist Meetinghouse".[75][76] One of the most valued members of the meeting house was Declaration of Independence signer John Hart who in 1740 purchased 193 acres (0.78 km2) of land in the north of current day Hopewell, and in 1747 as a sign of Hart’s devotion to the Church, donated a plot of his land to the Baptists.[77][78] The very next year the Baptists made good use of this land and in 1748 erected their Old School Baptist Church meeting house on West Broad Street. The meeting house brought in Baptists from miles around to Hopewell and encouraged Hopewell's early growth.[79]

Numerous lumber mills were established in and around Hopewell at this time to process the lumber that was generated from the clearing of forests for farms. In 1755, Isaac Eaton the first pastor of the Old School Baptist Church established his own school in Hopewell and later relocated his school to Rhode Island where it eventually became Brown University.[80]

Frog war[edit]

The first railroad to reach Hopewell was the Mercer and Somerset Railway, which was backed by the Pennsylvania Railroad. It was created largely to protect the monopoly the Pennsylvania Railroad had on New Jersey, by cutting off the first separately owned railroad in New Jersey, the Delaware and Bound Brook Railroad, by being built in the way of it. It was completed in 1874. The Delaware and Bound Brook reached Hopewell in 1876, but the railroad had to cross the Mercer and Somerset's track just to the northwest of Hopewell. A dispute occurred at the crossing, known as a frog, and escalated into each company parking locomotives over the crossing to prevent the other company from moving trains over it. Eventually militia had to be called in to keep the peace, and the Delaware and Bound Brook prevailed.[81] Soon after the Frog War the Mercer and Somerset was liquidated having failed at its purpose. Some of the abandoned right of way for the Mercer and Somerset in Hopewell became Model Avenue. The Delaware and Bound Brook was leased by the Philadelphia and Reading in 1879 for 999 years, and has become the CSX Trenton Line and is still in use today. The Frog is also what gives Hopewell Elementary school it mascot, "Freddy the Frog" in honor of the Hopewell frog war.[82]

Transportation[edit]

Roads[edit]

Hopewell has four major roads that travel through it. Route 518 Enters Hopewell from due west having come from Lambertville and then turns slightly northward, joining West Broad Street. Route 518 then runs through Hopewell and exits Hopewell in the East and heads towards Rocky Hill. Pennington Hopewell Road enters Hopewell from roughly the southwest, and immediately becomes West Broad street when it enters Hopewell. It connects Hopewell with Pennington to the south. Princeton Avenue, Route 569 starts at Broad Street and continues south and becomes Hopewell Princeton Road, and connects Hopewell with Princeton. Greenwood Avenue runs north out of Hopewell and connects Hopewell with Amwell

Rail[edit]

New Jersey Transit is planning to restore passenger commuter rail service to Hopewell. New Jersey Transit plans to use the existing one track right of way that CSX owns through Hopewell, the former four-track Reading Company Trenton Line. The proposed plan includes double tracking most of the CSX line to increase capacity and construction of a new rail station on Somerset Street. The use of the historic Hopewell Station is not under consideration in this current proposal. The line would connect Hopewell with New York City, as well as Philadelphia via a SEPTA connection in West Trenton[83] and restore service to Hopewell, which ended in 1982.

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Hopewell include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Municipal Officials & Borough Staff, Hopewell Borough. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 73.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Hopewell, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 6, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Hopewell borough, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 7. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Hopewell borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Hopewell, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Hopewell, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  18. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 162. Accessed October 26, 2012.
  19. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  20. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  21. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  22. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  23. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Hopewell borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  24. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Hopewell borough, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  25. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Hopewell borough, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  26. ^ Borough Government, Borough of Hopewell. Accessed October 10, 2006.
  27. ^ Mayor & Council, Hopewell Borough. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  28. ^ a b Elected Officials, p. 8. Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  29. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  30. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 59, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  31. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  32. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  33. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  34. ^ via Associated Press. "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in", NJ.com, October 31, 2013. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  35. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  36. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  37. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  38. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  39. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  40. ^ Elected Officials, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  41. ^ County Executive, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  42. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  43. ^ John Cimino, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  44. ^ Andrew Koontz, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  45. ^ Ann M. Cannon, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  46. ^ Anthony P. Carabelli, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  47. ^ Pasquale "Pat" Colavita, Jr., Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  48. ^ Samuel T. Frisby, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed August 1, 2011.
  49. ^ Lucylle R. S. Walter, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  50. ^ Meet the Freeholders, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  51. ^ County Clerk, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  52. ^ Meet the Sheriff, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  53. ^ Meet Surrogate Diane Gerofsky, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  54. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Mercer, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  55. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Mercer County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  56. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Mercer County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  57. ^ 2009 Governor: Mercer County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  58. ^ History , Hopewell Valley Regional School District. Accessed November 19, 2012. "The district, as it functions today, has been a regionalized operation since 1965 when voters of Hopewell Township, Hopewell Borough and Pennington Borough approved a plan to consolidate their schools."
  59. ^ Data for the Hopewell Valley Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  60. ^ Bear Tavern Elementary School, Hopewell Valley Regional School District. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  61. ^ Hopewell Elementary School, Hopewell Valley Regional School District. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  62. ^ Stony Brook Elementary School, Hopewell Valley Regional School District. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  63. ^ Toll Gate Grammar School, Hopewell Valley Regional School District. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  64. ^ Timberlane Middle School, Hopewell Valley Regional School District. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  65. ^ Central High School, Hopewell Valley Regional School District. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  66. ^ Schools, Hopewell Valley Regional School District. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  67. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Hopewell Valley Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  68. ^ Seabrook, Jack and Lorraine. Images of America Hopewell Valley, Arcadia Publishing, Charleston, SC, 2000. ISBN 0-7385-0431-9, pg. 19. “This and all other farms in Hopewell Valley could be traced all the way back to Daniel Coxe, original owner of the 30,000-acre (120 km2) tract that was to become Hopewell Township”
  69. ^ Ege, Ralph Pioneers of Old Hopewell (1908), Race & Savidge, Hopewell, NJ, pg. 15, quote “In the year 1691, Dr. Daniel Coxe transferred the right of government of West Jersey to a company of proprietaries called "The West Jersey Society of England," for a valuable consideration.”
  70. ^ Ege,Ralph Pioneers of Old Hopewell (1908), Race & Savidge, Hopewell, NJ, pg 15, quote :“This society appointed Thomas Revell their agent, and he claimed the right to sell lands and give deeds for the same in the name of the society.”
  71. ^ Ege,Ralph Pioneers of Old Hopewell (1908), Race & Savidge, Hopewell, NJ, pg 15, quote: “Great inducements were held out to the New England and Long Island settlers as well as to those of the older portions of this state… to avail themselves of the cheap and fertile lands of the 30,000-acre (120 km2) tract, and scores of them were induced to come and settle, only to find that after they had subdued the wilderness and established their homes, that their titles were utterly worthless.”
  72. ^ Ege, Ralph Pioneers of Old Hopewell (1908), Race & Savidge, Hopewell, NJ, pg 13-14, quote: “This Houghton tract was surveyed by Thomas Revell, agent for the West Jersey Society, for Thomas Tindall, on February 27, 1696, and was without doubt the first farm located in the Hopewell Valley. On November 10, 1699, a deed was given by Thomas Revell, agent for "Ye Honorable The West Jersey Society in England" of the one part, and Thomas Tindall of the other part, for the above tract, the consideration being "ten pounds per hundred acres," or fifty cents per acre in US currency, which was the regulation price for all the societies lands of the 30,000 acre tract. The above deed describes the 300 acres (1.2 km2) as a part of the 30,000 acre tract "lying above ye fialls of ye Delaware.”
  73. ^ Griffiths, Thomas Sharp, 'A History of Baptists in New Jersey'(1904), Barr Press Publishing Company, Hightstown, New Jersey, Ch. 5, pg 67, "Jonathan Stout, third son of Richard Stout, of Holmdel, a constituent of Middletown Church and who emigrated from Middletown (Holmdel) in 1706, the first settler of Hopewell"
  74. ^ Ege, Ralph Pioneers of Old Hopewell (1908), Race & Savidge, Hopewell, NJ, pg , quote “Fifty of these settlers (among whom is found the name of Thomas Houghton) entered into a solemn compact to stand by each other in a law suit with Dr. Coxe. After a long and tedious trial at Burlington, the case was decided against them, and this verdict caused the most distressing state of affairs in this township that was ever experienced in any community. Writs of ejectment had been served on them as "tenants" of Dr. Coxe to pay for their lands the second time or "quit." Many of them went to the northern part of the county which at that time extended to the New York state line, the county of Hunterdon, including Warren, Morris and Sussex counties, and an examination of the records of those counties between 1735 and 1750, will reveal many names that are familiar to the people of old Hopewell.”
  75. ^ Griffiths, Thomas Sharp, 'A History of Baptists in New Jersey'(1904), Barr Press Publishing Company, Hightstown, New Jersey, Ch. 5, pg 67, "The Church was organized at Mr. Stout's house, April 23rd, 1715, and worshipped for thirty-two years in the homes of the Stouts"
  76. ^ Valis, Glenn ‘JOHN HART Signer of the Declaration of Independence’, Accessed November 19, 2012. “Until well after the revolution, the area was thereafter call Baptist Meeting House."
  77. ^ Valis, Glenn ‘JOHN HART Signer of the Declaration of Independence’, Accessed November 19, 2012. "Around 1739-1740 John Hart bought the "homestead plantation" of 193 acres (0.78 km2) on the north side of what is now the town of Hopewell.".
  78. ^ Boro- History and Historic Sites, “The first church (Baptist Church) was constructed in 1748”, retrieved 1-08-2009
  79. ^ Seabrook, Jack and Lorraine. Images of America Hopewell Valley, Arcadia Publishing, Charleston, SC, 2000. ISBN 0-7385-0431-9, ISBN 0-7385-0431-9 pg 38, “The Old School Baptist Church... was a center for baptist from miles around.... Constructed in 1822, the building still stands... On West Broad Street”
  80. ^ Hopewell history to 1921, from Help Hopewell Honor Her Heroes, published for Library Week May 21–30, 1921. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  81. ^ Railroads of New Jersey Fragments of the past in the Garden State Landscape Lorett Treese 2006
  82. ^ "Hopewell Valley Regional School District, Pennington, NJ USA". Hvrsd.k12.nj.us. Retrieved 2012-03-24. 
  83. ^ New Jersey Transit system expansion
  84. ^ LaGorce, Tammy. "MUSIC PREVIEW; Not Quite Yasgur's Farm, But Close", The New York Times, May 28, 2006. Accessed February 15, 2011. "It's also why Danielia Cotton, a blues-rocker from Hopewell, will stomp around with an electric guitar not far from where the Philadelphia techno-dobro artist Slo-Mo will transmit Beck-like musical signals."
  85. ^ JOHN HART: Signer Of The Declaration Of Independence for New Jersey - A Biography, accessed April 17, 2007. "John Hart lived in Hopewell Township, in what is now the town of Hopewell, which was then known locally as Baptist Meeting House, for the church there."
  86. ^ Mahony & Zvosec, American Architects Directory, Third Edition (New York City: R.R. Bowker LLC, 1970), p.589.
  87. ^ From Mexican Days to Gold Rush: Memoirs of...Who Grew Up with California. Edited by Doyce B. Nunis, Jr by Marshall, James Wilson & Edward Gould Buffum, accessed April 17, 2007. "Marshall was born at Hopewell, NJ, went to California in 1845, participated in the 1846 Bear Flag Revolt, and discovered gold at Sutter's Mill in 1848."
  88. ^ Donahue, Deirdre. "Richard Preston will press your buttons in 'Panic in Level 4'", USA Today, June 16, 2008. Accessed February 15, 2011. "Author Richard Preston at the 75-acre farm where he lives in Hopewell, N.J."
  89. ^ via Associated Press. "Keith Robertson, author", Bangor Daily News, October 1, 1991. Accessed February 15, 2011. "Keith Carlton Robertson, who wrote the Henry Reed series of children's books, has died of cancer. He was 77. He died Sept. 23 at his home in Hopewell."

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