Hollister, California

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City of Hollister
City
Hollister's City Hall
Location in San Benito County and the state of California
Coordinates: 36°50′50″N 121°23′54″W / 36.84722°N 121.39833°W / 36.84722; -121.39833Coordinates: 36°50′50″N 121°23′54″W / 36.84722°N 121.39833°W / 36.84722; -121.39833
CountryUnited States
StateCalifornia
CountySan Benito
Area[1]
 • Total7.290 sq mi (18.880 km2)
 • Land7.290 sq mi (18.880 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)  0%
Elevation289 ft (88 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total34,928
 • Density4,800/sq mi (1,900/km2)
Time zonePacific (PST) (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST)PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP codes95023-95024
Area code(s)831
FIPS code06-34120
GNIS feature ID1658766
Websitewww.hollister.ca.gov
 
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City of Hollister
City
Hollister's City Hall
Location in San Benito County and the state of California
Coordinates: 36°50′50″N 121°23′54″W / 36.84722°N 121.39833°W / 36.84722; -121.39833Coordinates: 36°50′50″N 121°23′54″W / 36.84722°N 121.39833°W / 36.84722; -121.39833
CountryUnited States
StateCalifornia
CountySan Benito
Area[1]
 • Total7.290 sq mi (18.880 km2)
 • Land7.290 sq mi (18.880 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)  0%
Elevation289 ft (88 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total34,928
 • Density4,800/sq mi (1,900/km2)
Time zonePacific (PST) (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST)PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP codes95023-95024
Area code(s)831
FIPS code06-34120
GNIS feature ID1658766
Websitewww.hollister.ca.gov

Hollister is a city in and the county seat of San Benito County, California, United States. The population was 34,928 at the 2010 census. Hollister is primarily an agricultural town.

History[edit]

The Mutsun Ohlone Indians were the first known inhabitants of the Hollister region.

The town, then located in Monterey County, was founded November 19, 1868 when the San Justo Homestead Association purchased the property from William Welles Hollister (1818–1886). Undecided about a name for the new town, an association member, Napa vintner Henry Hagen, was tired of Saint and Spanish names in nearby towns and suggested the name Hollister. The City was incorporated on August 29, 1872. The western portion of San Benito County, including Hollister, was separated from Monterey County in 1874. The county was expanded eastward in 1887 to include portions taken from Merced and Fresno Counties.

Geology[edit]

A local home suffering from structural distortion as a result of being situated on top of the Calaveras Fault.

Hollister is well-known among geologists because it portrays one of the best examples of aseismic creep anywhere in the world. The Calaveras Fault (a branch of the San Andreas Fault system) bisects the city north and south, roughly along Locust Ave. and Powell St. The streets running east/west across the fault have significant visible offsets. The fault runs directly under several houses. Even though they are visibly contorted the houses are still habitable as the owners have reinforced them to withstand the dislocation of their foundations. Although there was extensive damage in the town after the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, and the governor of California came to visit, this was due to a slip of the San Andreas Fault and was not related to the aseismic creep on the Calaveras Fault.

Hollister is one of at least three California towns to claim the title of "Earthquake Capital of the World" the other two being Coalinga and Parkfield.[2]

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Hollister, California (1981–2010 normals)
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Average high °F (°C)59.8
(15.4)
62.5
(16.9)
66.0
(18.9)
74.2
(23.4)
78.4
(25.8)
80.6
(27)
81.5
(27.5)
81.2
(27.3)
76.6
(24.8)
66.9
(19.4)
59.4
(15.2)
71.4
(21.9)
Average low °F (°C)38.1
(3.4)
40.9
(4.9)
51.0
(10.6)
52.9
(11.6)
53.6
(12)
52.3
(11.3)
47.8
(8.8)
41.8
(5.4)
37.6
(3.1)
45.9
(7.7)
Precipitation inches (mm)2.92
(74.2)
2.81
(71.4)
2.28
(57.9)
0.97
(24.6)
0.39
(9.9)
0.07
(1.8)
0
(0)
0.01
(0.3)
0.21
(5.3)
0.70
(17.8)
1.67
(42.4)
2.14
(54.4)
14.16
(359.7)
Avg. precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in)8.88.98.34.82.20.60.10.20.92.85.57.750.8
Source: NOAA

Demographics[edit]

2000[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 34,413 people, 9,716 households, and 8,044 families residing in the city. The population density was 5,237.7 people per square mile (2,022.4/km²). There were 9,924 housing units at an average density of 1,510.5 per square mile (583.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city in 2010 was 29.1% non-Hispanic White, 0.7% non-Hispanic African American, 0.3% Native American, 2.4% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.1% from other races, and 1.5% from two or more races. 65.7% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 9,716 households out of which 52.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.3% were married couples living together, 12.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.2% were non-families. 12.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.52 and the average family size was 3.82.

In the city the population was spread out with 34.6% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 33.8% from 25 to 44, 15.8% from 45 to 64, and 6.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29 years. For every 100 females there were 101.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $56,104, and the median income for a family was $57,494. Males had a median income of $41,971 versus $28,277 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,857. About 6.9% of families and 9.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.2% of those under age 18 and 7.0% of those age 65 or over.

2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census[4] reported that Hollister had a population of 34,928. The population density was 4,791.4 people per square mile (1,850.0/km²). The racial makeup of Hollister was 10,164 (29.1%) White, 341 (1.0%) African American, 617 (1.8%) Native American, 929 (2.7%) Asian, 63 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 10,437 (29.9%) from other races, and 1,780 (5.1%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 22,965 persons (65.7%).

The Census reported that 34,813 people (99.7% of the population) lived in households, 9 (0%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 106 (0.3%) were institutionalized.

There were 9,860 households, out of which 5,291 (53.7%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 5,900 (59.8%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 1,511 (15.3%) had a female householder with no husband present, 720 (7.3%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 744 (7.5%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 55 (0.6%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 1,324 households (13.4%) were made up of individuals and 496 (5.0%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.53. There were 8,131 families (82.5% of all households); the average family size was 3.82.

The population was spread out with 11,076 people (31.7%) under the age of 18, 3,545 people (10.1%) aged 18 to 24, 9,927 people (28.4%) aged 25 to 44, 7,803 people (22.3%) aged 45 to 64, and 2,577 people (7.4%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30.8 years. For every 100 females there were 98.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.8 males.

There were 10,401 housing units at an average density of 1,426.8 per square mile (550.9/km²), of which 6,030 (61.2%) were owner-occupied, and 3,830 (38.8%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 2.3%; the rental vacancy rate was 5.0%. 20,781 people (59.5% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 14,032 people (40.2%) lived in rental housing units.

Politics[edit]

County offices, such as the San Benito County Courthouse, are located in the county seat of Hollister.

The city council consists of four council members and an elected mayor who represents the city at large. The first[citation needed] directly-elected mayor in the city's history, Ignacio Velazquez, was elected in November 2012. In the state legislature Hollister is located in the 12th Senate District, represented by Republican Anthony Cannella, and in the 28th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Luis Alejo. Federally, Hollister is located in California's 17th congressional district, which has a Cook Partisan Voting Index of D +17[5] and is represented by Democrat Sam Farr.

Media[edit]

Print[edit]

The Hollister Free Lance is a local newspaper now issued only on Fridays and published by the Gilroy-based Mainstreet Media Group. The San Juan Star is a monthly publication containing local coverage of San Benito County.

Broadcast[edit]

The following radio stations are licensed to Hollister:

Infrastructure[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Public transportation[edit]

Aviation[edit]

Healthcare[edit]

The State of California, Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development defines Hazel Hawkins Memorial Hospital as a General Acute Care Hospital in Hollister with Basic emergency care as of August 22, 2006. The facility is located in California Health Service Area 8 near (NAD83) latitude/longitude of 36°50′02″N 121°23′10″W / 36.83389°N 121.38611°W / 36.83389; -121.38611.

Motorcycle rally[edit]

The city was the site of an annual motorcycle rallies around July Fourth since 1997. The riot at the 1947 event was the basis for the 1954 film The Wild One. The rally began in 1997, and was known as the Hollister Independence Rally.

In 2005, the Hollister City Council discontinued their contract with the event organizers, the Hollister Independence Rally Committee, due to financial and public safety concerns.[8] The event was canceled in 2006 due to lack of funding for security, but returned in 2007 and 2008. The format of the rally in 2007 differed markedly from previous rallies, with vendors on San Benito Street instead of motorcycles. The bikes were forced to park on side streets and a strict downtown curfew was imposed, with the entire area being locked up at 9:00 pm. This event was popular with bikers and some local establishments profited, but the city footed the bill for much of the expenses and was left liable when organizers filed bankruptcy.

The 2009-2012 rallies were canceled, but the rally was reinstated in 2013, and was expected to be profitable for the town.[9] The turnout was estimated at around 150,000 people.[10]

Sister cities[edit]

Currently: none

Former:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ U.S. Census
  2. ^ http://erp-web.er.usgs.gov/reports/abstract/1997/nc/g3125.htm
  3. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ All data are derived from the United States Census Bureau reports from the 2010 United States Census, and are accessible on-line here. The data on unmarried partnerships and same-sex married couples are from the Census report DEC_10_SF1_PCT15. All other housing and population data are from Census report DEC_10_DP_DPDP1. Both reports are viewable online or downloadable in a zip file containing a comma-delimited data file. The area data, from which densities are calculated, are available on-line here. Percentage totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. The Census Bureau defines families as a household containing one or more people related to the householder by birth, opposite-sex marriage, or adoption. People living in group quarters are tabulated by the Census Bureau as neither owners nor renters. For further details, see the text files accompanying the data files containing the Census reports mentioned above.
  5. ^ "Will Gerrymandered Districts Stem the Wave of Voter Unrest?". Campaign Legal Center Blog. Retrieved October 20, 2007. 
  6. ^ Daniel P. Faigin. "Routes 25 through 32". California Highways. Retrieved February 12, 2008. 
  7. ^ "San Benito County Express - Intercounty". San Benito County Express. Retrieved February 12, 2008. 
  8. ^ "Big Blow for Biker Rally". The Gilroy Dispatch. November 23, 2005. Archived from the original on June 19, 2010. Retrieved June 19, 2010. 
  9. ^ "Manager: Hollister Rally to finish in the black". 
  10. ^ "Hollister biker rally lauded as major success". 

External links[edit]