Hinckley, Utah

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Hinckley, Utah
Town
Location of Hinckley, Utah
Location of Hinckley, Utah
Coordinates: 39°19′42″N 112°40′20″W / 39.32833°N 112.67222°W / 39.32833; -112.67222Coordinates: 39°19′42″N 112°40′20″W / 39.32833°N 112.67222°W / 39.32833; -112.67222
CountryUnited States
StateUtah
CountyMillard
Named forIra Hinckley
Area
 • Total5.0 sq mi (13.0 km2)
 • Land5.0 sq mi (13.0 km2)
 • Water0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation4,603 ft (1,403 m)
Population (2012)
 • Total694
 • Density139.2/sq mi (53.5/km2)
Time zoneMountain (MST) (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST)MDT (UTC-6)
ZIP code84635
Area code(s)435
FIPS code49-35740[1]
GNIS feature ID1428726[2]
 
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Hinckley, Utah
Town
Location of Hinckley, Utah
Location of Hinckley, Utah
Coordinates: 39°19′42″N 112°40′20″W / 39.32833°N 112.67222°W / 39.32833; -112.67222Coordinates: 39°19′42″N 112°40′20″W / 39.32833°N 112.67222°W / 39.32833; -112.67222
CountryUnited States
StateUtah
CountyMillard
Named forIra Hinckley
Area
 • Total5.0 sq mi (13.0 km2)
 • Land5.0 sq mi (13.0 km2)
 • Water0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation4,603 ft (1,403 m)
Population (2012)
 • Total694
 • Density139.2/sq mi (53.5/km2)
Time zoneMountain (MST) (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST)MDT (UTC-6)
ZIP code84635
Area code(s)435
FIPS code49-35740[1]
GNIS feature ID1428726[2]

Hinckley is a town in Millard County, Utah, United States, in the middle of the Sevier Desert. Irrigation water from the Sevier River, passing nearby, has been used to turn Hinckley into a farming oasis. The mountains that are common in Utah, are seen only in the distance, and beyond the reach of the river, a severe desert prevails. The population was 696 at the 2010 census.

History[edit]

Hinckley was first settled by Erastus F. Pack, a son of John Pack. The area was part of the LDS Deseret Ward until 1891 when that ward was split and the area now known as Hinckley was made the Hinckley Ward, named after Ira N. Hinckley.[3] George Theobald surveyed the town and divided it into 14 blocks of 5 acres each.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 5.0 square miles (13.0 km²), all of it land.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
1900591
1910324−45.2%
1920821153.4%
1930678−17.4%
1940637−6.0%
1950589−7.5%
1960397−32.6%
19704000.8%
198046416.0%
199065841.8%
20006986.1%
2010696−0.3%
Est. 2012694−0.3%

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 698 people, 218 households, and 180 families residing in the town. The population density was 138.8 people per square mile (53.6/km²). There were 245 housing units at an average density of 48.7 per square mile (18.8/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 97.71% White, 0.43% African American, 0.29% Native American, 0.14% Asian, 0.57% from other races, and 0.86% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.15% of the population.

There were 218 households out of which 43.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.5% were married couples living together, 6.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.0% were non-families. 16.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.20 and the average family size was 3.61.

In the town the population was spread out with 38.0% under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 24.6% from 25 to 44, 19.9% from 45 to 64, and 10.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 104.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 102.3 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $35,625, and the median income for a family was $39,375. Males had a median income of $32,333 versus $25,000 for females. The per capita income for the town was $12,700. About 9.5% of families and 13.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.9% of those under age 18 and 9.6% of those age 65 or over.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ Andrew Jenson. Encyclopedic History of the Church (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1941) p. 337