Highlands, New Jersey

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Highlands, New Jersey
—  Borough  —
Twin Lights
Map of Highlands in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Highlands, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°24′15″N 73°59′26″W / 40.40422°N 73.990674°W / 40.40422; -73.990674Coordinates: 40°24′15″N 73°59′26″W / 40.40422°N 73.990674°W / 40.40422; -73.990674
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyMonmouth
IncorporatedMarch 22, 1900
Government[1]
 • TypeFaulkner Act (Small Municipality)
 • MayorFrank Nolan (term ends December 31, 2013)[2]
 • AdministratorTim Hill[3]
 • ClerkCarolyn Cummins[4]
Area[5]
 • Total1.369 sq mi (3.546 km2)
 • Land0.767 sq mi (1.987 km2)
 • Water0.602 sq mi (1.559 km2)  43.96%
Elevation[6]13 ft (4 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total5,005
 • Density6,522.8/sq mi (2,518.5/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code07732[10]
Area code(s)732/838
FIPS code3402531500[5][11][12]
GNIS feature ID0885253[5][13]
Websitewww.highlandsnj.com
 
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Highlands, New Jersey
—  Borough  —
Twin Lights
Map of Highlands in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Highlands, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°24′15″N 73°59′26″W / 40.40422°N 73.990674°W / 40.40422; -73.990674Coordinates: 40°24′15″N 73°59′26″W / 40.40422°N 73.990674°W / 40.40422; -73.990674
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyMonmouth
IncorporatedMarch 22, 1900
Government[1]
 • TypeFaulkner Act (Small Municipality)
 • MayorFrank Nolan (term ends December 31, 2013)[2]
 • AdministratorTim Hill[3]
 • ClerkCarolyn Cummins[4]
Area[5]
 • Total1.369 sq mi (3.546 km2)
 • Land0.767 sq mi (1.987 km2)
 • Water0.602 sq mi (1.559 km2)  43.96%
Elevation[6]13 ft (4 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total5,005
 • Density6,522.8/sq mi (2,518.5/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code07732[10]
Area code(s)732/838
FIPS code3402531500[5][11][12]
GNIS feature ID0885253[5][13]
Websitewww.highlandsnj.com

Highlands is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough population was 5,005.[7][8][9] The population declined by 92 (-1.8%) from the 5,097 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 248 (+5.1%) from the 4,849 counted in the 1990 Census.[14] It is the home town of film maker, director, and comic book writer Kevin Smith. The eastern part of the town is built on a high bluff that overlooks Sandy Hook and the Atlantic Ocean. Atop this bluff are the Navesink Twin Lights.

Highlands was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 22, 1900, from portions of Middletown Township. Additional portions of Middletown Township were annexed in 1914.[15]

Highlands is part of the Bayshore Regional Strategic Plan, an effort by nine municipalities in northern Monmouth County to reinvigorate the area's economy by emphasizing the traditional downtowns, dense residential neighborhoods, maritime history, and the natural beauty of the Raritan Bayshore coastline.

Contents

Geography

Highlands is located at 40°24′15″N 73°59′26″W / 40.40422°N 73.990674°W / 40.40422; -73.990674 (40.40422,-73.990674). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.369 square miles (3.546 km2), of which, 0.767 square miles (1.987 km2) of it is land and 0.602 square miles (1.559 km2) of it (43.96%) is water.[5][16]

Demographics

Historical populations
CensusPop.
19001,228
19101,38612.9%
19201,73124.9%
19301,8778.4%
19402,07610.6%
19502,95942.5%
19603,53619.5%
19703,91610.7%
19805,18732.5%
19904,849−6.5%
20005,0975.1%
20105,005−1.8%
Population sources:
1900-1910[17] 1910-1930[18]
1930-1990[19] 2000[20] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 5,005 people, 2,623 households, and 1,159 families residing in the borough. The population density was 6,522.8 inhabitants per square mile (2,518.5 /km2). There were 3,146 housing units at an average density of 4,100.1 per square mile (1,583.1 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 92.97% (4,653) White, 1.62% (81) African American, 0.28% (14) Native American, 1.30% (65) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 1.94% (97) from other races, and 1.90% (95) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.47% (324) of the population.[7]

There were 2,623 households out of which 15.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 31.3% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 55.8% were non-families. 45.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.91 and the average family size was 2.70.[7]

In the borough the age distribution of the population shows 14.2% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 29.0% from 25 to 44, 37.3% from 45 to 64, and 12.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.1 years. For every 100 females there were 101.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.6 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $75,291 (with a margin of error of +/- $12,503) and the median family income was $80,430 (+/- $7,353). Males had a median income of $63,686 (+/- $6,479) versus $46,641 (+/- $9,013) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $42,737 (+/- $4,647). About 11.5% of families and 12.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 30.3% of those under age 18 and 1.9% of those age 65 or over.[21]

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census[11] there were 5,097 people, 2,450 households, and 1,193 families residing in the borough. The population density was 6,689.2 people per square mile (2,589.4/km2). There were 2,820 housing units at an average density of 3,700.9 per square mile (1,432.6/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 95.10% White, 1.59% African American, 0.33% Native American, 1.00% Asian, 0.59% from other races, and 1.39% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.06% of the population.[20][22]

There were 2,450 households out of which 19.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 34.4% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 51.3% were non-families. 41.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.08 and the average family size was 2.90.[20]

In the borough the population was spread out with 18.8% under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 36.8% from 25 to 44, 25.8% from 45 to 64, and 11.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 100.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.0 males.[20]

The median income for a household in the borough was $45,692, and the median income for a family was $50,985. Males had a median income of $50,296 versus $31,265 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $29,369. About 11.5% of families and 12.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.0% of those under age 18 and 11.7% of those age 65 or over.[20]

Government

Local government

Highlands is governed by a Faulkner Act form of New Jersey municipal government under the Small Municipality (Plan B). The officials that head the government are a mayor and four council members, who are elected at large in partisan elections to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year.[1] The current form of government was adopted in 1956.[23]

As of 2012, members of the Highlands Borough Council are Mayor Frank L. Nolan, Council President Rebecca Kane, Christopher Francy, Richard O'Neil and Kevin Redmond.[24]

David "Bruce" Hilling was the Borough Administrator beginning in April 2007, but was terminated on April 6, 2011.[25]

Federal, state and county representation

Highlands Boro is in the 6th Congressional district[26] and is part of New Jersey's 13th state legislative district.[8][27] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Highlands Boro had been in the 11th state legislative district.[26]

New Jersey's Sixth Congressional District is represented by Frank Pallone (D, Long Branch). New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Frank Lautenberg (D, Cliffside Park) and Bob Menendez (D, Hoboken).

The 11th legislative district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Jennifer Beck (R, Red Bank) and in the General Assembly by Mary Pat Angelini (R, Ocean Township, Monmouth County) and Caroline Casagrande (R, Colts Neck Township).[28] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[29] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[30]

Monmouth County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members who are elected at-large to serve three year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting, the board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director. [31] As of 2012, Monmouth County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director John P. Curley (R, Middletown Township; 2012),[32] Freeholder Deputy Director Thomas A. Arnone (R, Neptune City; 2013),[33] Lillian G. Burry (R, Colts Neck Township; 2014),[34] Serena DiMaso (R, Holmdel Township; 2013)[35] and Gary J. Rich, Sr. (R, Spring Lake; 2014).[36][37][38]

Education

The Highlands School District serves public school students in Pre-Kindergarten through sixth grade. Highlands Elementary School had an enrollment of 176 students in the 2009-10 school year.[39]

For grades 7-12, public school students attend Henry Hudson Regional High School, a comprehensive six-year high school and regional public school district that serves students from both Atlantic Highlands and Highlands.[40] The district served a total enrollment of 431 students in the 2009-10 school year.[41]

Transportation

The Highlands-Sea Bright Bridge, a 1,240-foot (380 m) drawbridge built in 1932, connected Highlands in the west to Sea Bright, New Jersey in the east, across the Shrewsbury River. The eastern terminus was at the entrance to Sandy Hook. The span was part of Route 36. The bridge has been replaced with a fixed span instead of a drawbridge. The new bridge rises 65 feet (20 m) instead of the original span's 35 feet (11 m).[42][43]

SeaStreak offers ferry service to New York City at Conner's Ferry Landing. There are three morning trips, which stop at Pier 11/Wall Street and then the East 34th Street Ferry Landing. Six ferry trips return each weekday evening.[44]

New Jersey Transit provides local bus transportation on the 834 route to Red Bank.[45][46] Academy Bus offers bus service to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan and to Wall Street.[44]

Popular culture

The Kevin Smith film Jersey Girl is set in Highlands.[47] In addition, Highlands' ZIP code (07732) is featured in the opening titles of Mallrats, and is Dante's ZIP code in Clerks: The Animated Series, although it is misattributed in the show to nearby Leonardo.

References

  1. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 58.
  2. ^ 2012 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, April 26, 2012. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  3. ^ Borough Administrator, Borough Of Highlands. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  4. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough Of Highlands. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  5. ^ a b c d Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Highlands, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed January 4, 2008.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Highlands borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 7. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Highlands borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  10. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Highlands, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  11. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved January 31, 2008. 
  12. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  13. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. October 25, 2007. http://geonames.usgs.gov. Retrieved January 31, 2008. 
  14. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  15. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 180. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  16. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. http://www.census.gov/geo/www/gazetteer/gazette.html. Retrieved April 23, 2011. 
  17. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  18. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  19. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  20. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Highlands borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  21. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Highlands borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  22. ^ DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Highlands borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  23. ^ Bryson, James W. The History of Highlands, Borough of Highlands. Accessed May 21, 2008. "The present form of government, councilmanic form under the Faulkner Act, Small Municipality Plan B, came into effect in 1956."
  24. ^ Mayor and Council, Borough of Highlands. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  25. ^ Muessig, Terry (April 7, 2011). "Highlands fires its administrator". Asbury Park Press. http://www.app.com/article/20110407/NJNEWS/110407104/Highlands-fires-its-administrator. Retrieved April 11, 2011. 
  26. ^ a b 2011 New Jersey Citizen’s Guide to Government, p. 59, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  27. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  28. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  29. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. http://www.nj.gov/governor/about/. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  30. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. http://www.nj.gov/governor/lt/. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  31. ^ Monmouth County Government, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed April 2, 2012.
  32. ^ Freeholder Director John P. Curley, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed April 1, 2012.
  33. ^ Freeholder Deputy Director Thomas A. Arnone, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed April 1, 2012.
  34. ^ Freeholder Lillian G. Burry, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed April 1, 2012.
  35. ^ Freeholder Serena DiMaso, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed April 1, 2012.
  36. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed April 1, 2012.
  37. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed April 1, 2012.
  38. ^ Staff. "Curley named director of Monmouth freeholders", Tri-Town News, January 19, 2012. Accessed April 2, 2012. "John P. Curley took the reins of the Monmouth County Board of Freeholders on Jan. 5 at Monmouth County’s annual Organization Day held at Biotechnology High School, Freehold Township, pledging to hold the line on spending and provide more oversight over county government... Freeholders Lillian G. Burry and Gary J. Rich Sr. were sworn in to office on Jan. 5. Burry begins her third three-year term; for Rich, it is his first.... Freeholder Thomas A. Arnone was selected to serve as deputy director of the board.... On Jan. 14, Monmouth County Republican representatives elected Holmdel Township Committeewoman Serena DiMaso to take Clifton’s seat. Republicans have 5-0 control of the freeholder board."
  39. ^ Data for Highlands School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  40. ^ About Henry Hudson, Henry Hudson Regional High School. Accessed April 15, 2011. "This school district serves the towns of Atlantic Highlands and Highlands and students in grades seven through twelve."
  41. ^ Henry Hudson Regional High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  42. ^ "Highlands Bridge work under way". Star-Ledger. July 11, 2008. http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/jersey/index.ssf?/base/news-11/1215750956298080.xml&coll=1. Retrieved 2008-07-28. "The 76-year-old drawbridge carries Route 36 over the Shrewsbury River between Highlands and Sea Bright. Drivers have only two choices when they pull out of Sandy Hook -- they can turn south on Route 36 and drive along the Shore through Sea Bright or head north and cross the bridge." 
  43. ^ "Demolition starts on Highlands-Sea Bright bridge". Asbury Park Press. July 15, 2008. http://www.app.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080715/NEWS01/807150382/0/NEWS. Retrieved 2008-07-28. "About 12:35 p.m. Monday, as planned, J.H. Reid Construction Co. of South Plainfield began demolishing portions of the 75-year-old drawbridge to make way for its replacement — a 65-foot-high, fixed-span bridge." [dead link]
  44. ^ a b Caldwelll, Dave (2008-08-24). "A Clam Town, Coming Out of Its Shell - Living In Highlands, N.J.". The New York Times: p. RE7 of the New York edition. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/24/realestate/24livi.html. Retrieved 2008-08-24. 
  45. ^ Route 834 schedule, New Jersey Transit. Accessed August 5, 2012.
  46. ^ Monmouth County Bus / Rail connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  47. ^ Miramax Films: Jersey Girl, accessed November 23, 2006

External links

Preceded by
Sandy Hook
Beaches of New JerseySucceeded by
Sea Bright