Heptanal

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Heptanal[1]
Identifiers
CAS number111-71-7 YesY
PubChem8130
ChemSpider7838 YesY
UNII92N104S3HF YesY
KEGGC14390 YesY
ChEMBLCHEMBL18104 YesY
Jmol-3D imagesImage 1
Properties
Molecular formulaC7H14O
Molar mass114.18
AppearanceClear liquid
Density0.80902 at 30 °C
Melting point−43.3 °C; −45.9 °F; 229.8 K
Boiling point152.8 °C; 307.0 °F; 425.9 K
Solubility in waterSlightly soluble
Related compounds
Related aldehydesHexanal

Octanal

 YesY (verify) (what is: YesY/N?)
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
Infobox references
 
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Heptanal[1]
Identifiers
CAS number111-71-7 YesY
PubChem8130
ChemSpider7838 YesY
UNII92N104S3HF YesY
KEGGC14390 YesY
ChEMBLCHEMBL18104 YesY
Jmol-3D imagesImage 1
Properties
Molecular formulaC7H14O
Molar mass114.18
AppearanceClear liquid
Density0.80902 at 30 °C
Melting point−43.3 °C; −45.9 °F; 229.8 K
Boiling point152.8 °C; 307.0 °F; 425.9 K
Solubility in waterSlightly soluble
Related compounds
Related aldehydesHexanal

Octanal

 YesY (verify) (what is: YesY/N?)
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
Infobox references

Heptanal or heptanaldehyde is an alkyl aldehyde. It is a colourless liquid with a strong fruity odor, which is used as precursor to components in perfumes and lubricants.[2]

Production[edit]

It can be obtained from castor oil by distillation under reduced pressure.[1] It is synthesized by degradation of the esters of ricinoleic acid. It is also prepared by hydroformylation of hexene.[2]

Uses[edit]

Industrially, it is used in the manufacture of α-amylcinnamaldehyde, a component of many fragrances.[2] It is the precursor to 1-heptanol and ethyl heptanoate, the latter being a component of certain lubricants.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Merck Index, 11th Edition, 4578.
  2. ^ a b c Christian Kohlpaintner, Markus Schulte, Jürgen Falbe, Peter Lappe, Jürgen Weber (2005), "Aldehydes, Aliphatic", Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry, Weinheim: Wiley-VCH, doi:10.1002/14356007.a01_321.pub2 
  3. ^ n-Heptyl Aldehyde at chemicalland21.com