Heptagram

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Regular heptagram
Obtuse heptagram.svg
Regular {7/2} heptagram
Edges and vertices7
Schläfli symbol{7/2}, {7/3}
Coxeter diagramCDel node 1.pngCDel 7.pngCDel rat.pngCDel d2.pngCDel node.png, CDel node 1.pngCDel 7.pngCDel rat.pngCDel d3.pngCDel node.png
Symmetry groupDihedral (D7)
Propertiesstar, cyclic, equilateral, isogonal, isotoxal
 
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Regular heptagram
Obtuse heptagram.svg
Regular {7/2} heptagram
Edges and vertices7
Schläfli symbol{7/2}, {7/3}
Coxeter diagramCDel node 1.pngCDel 7.pngCDel rat.pngCDel d2.pngCDel node.png, CDel node 1.pngCDel 7.pngCDel rat.pngCDel d3.pngCDel node.png
Symmetry groupDihedral (D7)
Propertiesstar, cyclic, equilateral, isogonal, isotoxal

A heptagram, septagram, or septegram is a seven-pointed star drawn with seven straight strokes.

Geometry[edit]

In general, a heptagram is any self-intersecting heptagon (7-sided polygon).

There are two regular heptagrams, labeled as {7/2} and {7/3}, with the second number representing the vertex interval step from a regular heptagram, {7/1}.

This is the smallest star polygon that can be drawn in two forms, as irreducible fractions. The two heptagrams are sometimes called the heptagram (for {7/2}) and the great heptagram (for {7/3}).

The previous one, the regular hexagram {6/2}, is a compound of two triangles. The smallest star polygon is the {5/2} pentagram.

The next one is the {8/3} octagram, followed by the regular enneagram, which also has two forms: {9/2} and {9/4}, as well as one compound of 3 triangles {9/3}.

Obtuse heptagram.svg
First heptagram {7/2}
Acute heptagram.svg
Second heptagram {7/3}
Heptagrams.svg
Both heptagrams inscribed within a heptagon
Heptagrammic prism 7-2.png
Heptagrammic prism (7/2)
Heptagrammic prism 7-3.png
Heptagrammic prism (7/3)

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