Hangover Heaven

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Hangover Heaven
IndustryHangover treatment and research
Founded2012
FoundersDr. Jason Burke
HeadquartersParadise, Nevada
Websitehttp://www.hangoverheaven.com
 
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Hangover Heaven
IndustryHangover treatment and research
Founded2012
FoundersDr. Jason Burke
HeadquartersParadise, Nevada
Websitehttp://www.hangoverheaven.com

Hangover Heaven is a mobile veisalgia treatment clinic based in Paradise, Nevada, that administers treatment for hangovers through an IV.[1][2][3][4][5][6] It is the first clinic that studied the treatment of hangovers, with its own Hangover Research Institute.[6] Hangover Heaven was founded by Dr. Jason Burke, a Duke University-trained certified anesthesiologist.[1][2] The center opened in April 2012.[7][8]

History[edit]

Burke first formulated the idea for Hangover Heaven after observing that certain IV treatments administered in the recovery room could also be used to treat hangover symptoms.[2][3][4][6][9][10] After multiple experiments, Burke found a treatment, a saline mixture containing vitamins, antioxidants, and medications, that proved effective in relieving hangover symptoms in less than an hour.[5][6][11][12] Burke invested in a 45-foot Eagle M-15 bus to serve as both transport and the main Hangover Heaven clinic to save on building costs.[4][6] The facility opened in April 2012.[4][6][7] The bus holds two lounge areas and sleeping quarters with bunk beds.[7] It travels along the Las Vegas Strip hotels to pick up patients and makes house calls.[13][14] Hangover Heaven provides three types of treatments, containing multivitamins, antioxidants, and medication to treat nausea and inflammation.[6][10][13] The facility offers hangover prevention education, preventive IV therapy treatments including the Myers’ cocktail, and vitamin supplements via Vita Heaven.[6] The clinic originally ran on weekends, but expanded to operate on a daily basis with a second clinic in an office space.[2][6][15][16]

Reception[edit]

Hangover Heaven’s treatments have met with some concern by members of the medical community.[1][2][3][4][5][13][17] In an interview, Dr. Drew Pinsky debated with Burke on the issue of alcoholism in regards to the Hangover Heaven treatment.[18] In addition, Dr. Arthur Caplan commented the risk the clinic faces in treating patients with underlying medical conditions.[2][14] In response, Burke stated he takes a subjective evaluation and complete medical history to ensure his patients are not still intoxicated or under the influence of drugs, and staffed the clinic with emergency medical technicians and RNs.[2][13][15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Glatter, Robert (15 April 2012). "Hangover Heaven...Descent Into Hell?". Forbes. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Briggs, Bill (11 April 2012). "Vegas hangover treatment bus: Is IV flush safe?". NBC News. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c "Hangover Heaven bus rolls through Las Vegas: What do "patients" think?". CBS News. 23 April 2013. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d e Padgett, Sonya (14 April 2012). "Hangover Heaven doctor treats the buzz kill on Strip". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c "Intoxication Nation: Hangover Helper". ABC's 20/20. 21 August 2012. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i Beato, Greg (1 February 2013). "A Sin City Savior’s Quest To Cure The Common Hangover". BuzzFeed. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c D'costa, Melissa (5 June 2012). "Mobile cure for a hangover". The Times of India. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  8. ^ "Consult the World's Leading Hangover Expert". GQ. Retrieved 18 May 2014. 
  9. ^ "Las Vegas: Kater ade im 'Hangover Heaven'". RTL. 13 August 2013. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  10. ^ a b "Bus offers Las Vegas partiers hangover cures". NBC's Today. 17 April 2012. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  11. ^ "Contra resacas". Telemundo. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  12. ^ "Goodbye to The Hangover: New Las Vegas drive-by bus service claims to cure you of that sickly morning after in just 45 minutes". Daily Mail Online. 10 April 2012. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  13. ^ a b c d Castillo, Michelle (10 April 2012). "Hangover Heaven "after-party" bus promises cure in 45 minutes". CBS News. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  14. ^ a b "Hangover Heaven offers mobile 'cure' in Las Vegas". Fox News. 9 April 2012. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  15. ^ a b Yancey, Kitty (3 April 2013). "'Hangover Heaven' bus cruises the Strip". USA Today. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  16. ^ Wetherbe, Jamie. "Hangover Heaven". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  17. ^ Beato, Greg (26 April 2012). "The Cure for the Common Hangover". Reason.com. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  18. ^ Ibanga, Imaeyen (20 April 2012). "'Hangover Heaven' bus aims to cure what ails you". HLN. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 

External links[edit]