H. John Heinz III

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H. John Heinz III
United States Senator
from Pennsylvania
In office
January 3, 1977 – April 4, 1991
Preceded byHugh Scott
Succeeded byHarris Wofford
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's 18th district
In office
November 2, 1971 – January 3, 1977
Preceded byRobert Corbett
Succeeded byDoug Walgren
Personal details
BornHenry John Heinz III
(1938-10-23)October 23, 1938
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
DiedApril 4, 1991(1991-04-04) (aged 52)
Lower Merion Township, Pennsylvania
NationalityAmerican
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Teresa Heinz
 
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H. John Heinz III
United States Senator
from Pennsylvania
In office
January 3, 1977 – April 4, 1991
Preceded byHugh Scott
Succeeded byHarris Wofford
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's 18th district
In office
November 2, 1971 – January 3, 1977
Preceded byRobert Corbett
Succeeded byDoug Walgren
Personal details
BornHenry John Heinz III
(1938-10-23)October 23, 1938
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
DiedApril 4, 1991(1991-04-04) (aged 52)
Lower Merion Township, Pennsylvania
NationalityAmerican
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Teresa Heinz

Henry John Heinz III (October 23, 1938 – April 4, 1991) was an American politician from Pennsylvania. A Republican, Heinz served in the United States House of Representatives from 1971 to 1977 and in the United States Senate from 1977 until his death in 1991.[1]

Contents

Early life, education and early career

Henry John Heinz III was born to H. J. Heinz II (heir to the H. J. Heinz Company) and Joan Diehl in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on October 23, 1938. An only child, Heinz moved to San Francisco, California, with his mother and stepfather, U.S. Navy Captain C.C. "Monty" McCauley following his parents' divorce in 1942. Although he was raised and primarily resided in San Francisco throughout his childhood, Heinz often spent the summer months with his father in Pittsburgh.[2]

Heinz graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy in 1956.[1] He then attended and graduated from Yale University in 1960, majoring in History, Arts and Letters, and subsequently graduated from Harvard Business School in 1963. It was during his years at Harvard, during summer break, that he met his future wife, Teresa Simões Ferreira, who attended the University of Geneva. Upon graduating from Harvard Business School in 1963, Heinz served in the United States Air Force Reserve and was on active duty during the same year.[2] He remained in the Air Force Reserve until 1969.[1]

Before entering politics, Heinz served as an assistant to Pennsylvania Republican U.S. Senator Hugh Scott and played an active role as assistant campaign manager during Scott's campaign for re-election. Heinz then worked in the financial and marketing division of the H. J. Heinz Company between 1965 to 1970, after which he became a professor of business at the Carnegie Mellon University's Graduate School of Industrial Administration.[2]

Political career

U.S. House of Representatives

In 1971, Heinz entered politics after Representative Robert Corbett, who represented Pennsylvania's 8th congressional district died in office. After winning the Republican primary, Heinz won the special election on November 2, 1971 to fill the vacancy created by Corbett's death. Heinz was re-elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1972 and 1974.[1][2]

U.S. Senate

Heinz opted not to run for re-election to his seat in the House of Representatives, choosing instead to run for the open United States Senate seat representing Pennsylvania created by the retirement of incumbent Hugh Scott in 1976. Heinz won the election and was subsequently re-elected in 1982 and again in 1988.[2]

While a U.S. Senator, Heinz was a member of the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, the Committee on Finance, the National Commission on Social Security Reform, the National Commission on Health Care Reform, the Northeast Coalition, and the Steel Caucus. He also served as chairman of the Subcommittee on International Finance and Monetary Policies, the Special Committee on Aging, and the Republican Conference Task Force on Job Training and Education.[2]

Death

On April 4, 1991, Heinz and six other people were killed when a Bell 412 helicopter and a Piper Aerostar with Heinz aboard collided in mid-air above Merion Elementary School in Lower Merion Township, Pennsylvania. All aboard both aircraft, as well as two children at the school, were killed.[3] The helicopter had been dispatched to investigate a problem with the landing gear of Heinz's plane. While moving in for a closer look, the helicopter collided with the plane, causing both aircraft to lose control and crash.[4]

Following a funeral at Heinz Chapel[5] that was attended by President George H. W. Bush and Vice President Dan Quayle,[6] Senator Heinz was interred in the Heinz family mausoleum in Homewood Cemetery, located in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.[1] His widow, Teresa Heinz, later married Senator John Kerry.[7]

Honors

The John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum was renamed following his death. The 1,200 acre (4.9 km²) refuge includes the largest remaining freshwater tidal marsh in Pennsylvania, as well as other habitats that are home to a variety of plants and animals native to Southeastern Pennsylvania.

Several institutions bear his name, including:

References

Further reading

External links

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Robert Corbett
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's 18th congressional district

1971–1977
Succeeded by
Doug Walgren
United States Senate
Preceded by
Hugh Scott
United States Senator (Class 1) from Pennsylvania
1977–1991
Served alongside: Richard Schweiker and Arlen Specter
Succeeded by
Harris Wofford
Party political offices
Preceded by
Robert Packwood
Oregon
Chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee
1979–1981
Succeeded by
Robert Packwood
Oregon
Preceded by
Richard Lugar
Indiana
Chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee
1985–1987
Succeeded by
Rudy Boschwitz
Minnesota
Preceded by
Hugh Scott
Republican nominee for U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania
(Class 1)

1976, 1982, 1988
Succeeded by
Dick Thornburgh
Political offices
Preceded by
Lawton Chiles
Florida
Chairman of the Senate Aging Committee
1981–1987
Succeeded by
John Melcher
Montana