Gosht

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Gosht
TypeMeat
Main ingredientsGoat meat
Cookbook:Gosht  Gosht
 
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For places in Iran, see Gosht, Iran.
Gosht
TypeMeat
Main ingredientsGoat meat
Cookbook:Gosht  Gosht

Gosht is the transliteration for the Persian word گوشت, meaning meat or flesh, which has been adopted by other South Asian languages.[1]

Gosht is an essential part of Pakistani cuisine, which features many meat-based gravies. A wide variety of meats are used in Pakistan.

In India, gosht dishes are likely to be made with goat or mutton. In India the term "mutton" is more likely to mean goat rather than adult sheep, as it does elsewhere in the English-speaking world. As the Hindu religion prohibits eating beef, and Islam prohibits the eating of pork, Indian gosht is not traditionally made with these meats. When Indian dishes are translated and adapted for Western diners, lamb is the meat most often used in the adaptation. This has led to a common misconception that gosht means "lamb".

Variations include bhuna ghosht, kadhai gosht, raan gosht, dal gosht, nihari gosht, rara Gosht, and saag gosht, which includes spinach. Karahi gosht is cooked in a traditional cooking pot from which it takes its name.

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