Gordon Korman

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Gordon Korman
Born(1963-10-23) October 23, 1963 (age 50)
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
OccupationAuthor
NationalityCanadian, American
Period1975–
Genresrealistic fiction, adventure, comedy
Notable work(s)Macdonald Hall; Swindle; One False Note; Toilet Paper Tigers; 39 Clues
 
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Gordon Korman
Born(1963-10-23) October 23, 1963 (age 50)
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
OccupationAuthor
NationalityCanadian, American
Period1975–
Genresrealistic fiction, adventure, comedy
Notable work(s)Macdonald Hall; Swindle; One False Note; Toilet Paper Tigers; 39 Clues

Gordon Korman (born October 23, 1963) is a Canadian American author, primarily of novels for children and young adults.[1] He lives in Long Island's Great Neck, New York, with his wife and three children.

Korman wrote his first book unexpectedly when he was twelve years old.[2] While attending German Mills Public School, his 7th grade English teacher was Mr. Hamilton, a track and field coach who found himself teaching English for the first time.[1] Hamilton required students to write a novel during the semester, and this assignment became the manuscript for Korman's first book, This Can't Be Happening at Macdonald Hall, the first book in his Macdonald Hall (Bruno and Boots) series.[1]

Korman was the Scholastic Arrow Book Club monitor for the class; after completing the assignment, he mailed his manuscript to Scholastic.[2] This Can't Be Happening at Macdonald Hall was published by Scholastic Press in 1978 when Korman was only fourteen years old.[1] Before graduating from high school in Thornhill, Ont., Korman wrote and published five books.[3]

Korman has written more than 75 books which have sold more than 17 million copies in a career that has spanned three decades.

Biography[edit]

Korman was born in Montreal, Quebec, where he lived until 1970.[1] Korman grew up in Thornhill, Ontario just north of Toronto, Ontario and attended German Mills Public School and public high school at Thornlea Secondary School in Thornhill, Ontario.[1][3] Korman moved to the United States to attend college at New York University where he studied in the film and film-writing department.[2] Korman received a BA from New York University in 1985;[1] his degree was in Dramatic and Visual Writing with a minor in Motion Picture and Television.[4]

Non-series books[edit]

Macdonald Hall series[edit]

Bugs Potter[edit]

Jeremy Bloom[edit]

Monday Night Football[edit]

Slapshots series[edit]

Nose Pickers series[edit]

The Island series[edit]

Everest series[edit]

Dive series[edit]

On the Run series[edit]

Kidnapped series[edit]

Swindle series[edit]

Titanic series[edit]

The 39 Clues series[edit]

Adaptations[edit]

The Monday Night Football Club series was adapted into the Disney Channel TV series The Jersey, which ran for four years.

The Macdonald Hall series was optioned, but a series was never produced. Other optioned books include No Coins, Please, the Island Trilogy and The Twinkie Squad.[1]

Awards and recognition[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Official Gordon Korman Web Site". Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c "Gordon Korman Biography". Scholastic. Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  3. ^ a b Zlomislic, Diana (April 1, 2009). "Prodigy or precocious?". Toronto Star. Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  4. ^ a b B., Niki. "The Stellar Book Award: Gordon Kom". Steller Award.ca. Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  5. ^ Gordon Korman; Bernice Korman (October 1, 1996). The last-place sports poems of Jeremy Bloom: a collection of poems about winning, losing, and being a good sport (sometimes). Scholastic. ISBN 978-0-590-25516-5. Retrieved December 6, 2011. 
  6. ^ [1] Externally archived page.
  7. ^ a b "2001 Popular Paperbacks". YALSA. Retrieved February 2, 2011.  Externally archived page.
  8. ^ "1999 Popular Paperbacks". YALSA. Retrieved February 2, 2011.  Externally archived page.
  9. ^ "2003 Best Books for Young Adults". YALSA. Retrieved February 2, 2011.  Externally archived page.
  10. ^ "2003 Top Ten Best Books for Young Adults". YALSA. Retrieved February 2, 2011.  Externally archived page.
  11. ^ YRCA Past Winners
  12. ^ "YRCA Past Winners". PNLA. 2003. Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  13. ^ "2004 Best Books for Young Adults". YSLA. Retrieved February 2, 2011.  Externally archived page.
  14. ^ "Charlie May Simon Children's Book Award". Retrieved September 7, 2012. 

External links[edit]