Gloria Naylor

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Gloria Naylor
Gloria Naylor by David Shankbone.jpg
Born(1950-01-25) January 25, 1950 (age 63)
New York, U.S.
NationalityAmerican
EthnicityAfrican
OccupationNovelist
 
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Gloria Naylor
Gloria Naylor by David Shankbone.jpg
Born(1950-01-25) January 25, 1950 (age 63)
New York, U.S.
NationalityAmerican
EthnicityAfrican
OccupationNovelist

Gloria Naylor (born January 25, 1950) is an American novelist.

Early life[edit]

Naylor was born on January 25, 1950 in New York, she was the first child to Roosevelt Naylor and Alberta McAlpin. During Naylor's childhood, her father worked as a transit worker and her mother as a telephone operator. From a young age, Naylor's mother encouraged her to read and keep a journal. Even though her mother had little education, she loved to read and often worked overtime in the fields as a sharecropper to produce enough money to join a book club.

In 1963, she moved to Queens with her family. Five years later Naylor followed in her mother's footsteps and became a Jehovah's Witness, but she left seven years later as ”things weren't getting better, but worse.”[1]

Education[edit]

Naylor earned her bachelor’s degree in English at Brooklyn College, after which she obtained a master’s degree in American Studies from Yale University.

Career[edit]

Naylor's debut novel The Women of Brewster Place was published in 1982 and won the 1983 National Book Award in the category First Novel.[2] It was adapted as a 1989 film of the same name by Oprah Winfrey's Harpo Productions.

During her career as a professor, Naylor taught writing and literature at several universities, including at George Washington University, New York University, Boston University, and Cornell University.

Works[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Voices from the Gaps biography: Naylor, Gloria
  2. ^ "National Book Awards – 1983". National Book Foundation. Retrieved 2012-02-28. (With acceptance speech by Naylor and essays by Rachel Helgeson and Felicia Pride from the Awards 60-year anniversary blog.)
    • First novels or first works of fiction were recognized from 1980 to 1985.

External links[edit]