Glassell Park, Los Angeles

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Glassell Park
—  Neighborhood of Los Angeles  —
Glassell Park is located in Los Angeles
Glassell Park
Location within Central Los Angeles
Coordinates: 34°07′01″N 118°13′59″W / 34.116944°N 118.233056°W / 34.116944; -118.233056
CountryUnited States
StateCalifornia
CountyLos Angeles
CityLos Angeles
Time zonePST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST)PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code90065
Area code(s)323
 
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Glassell Park
—  Neighborhood of Los Angeles  —
Glassell Park is located in Los Angeles
Glassell Park
Location within Central Los Angeles
Coordinates: 34°07′01″N 118°13′59″W / 34.116944°N 118.233056°W / 34.116944; -118.233056
CountryUnited States
StateCalifornia
CountyLos Angeles
CityLos Angeles
Time zonePST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST)PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code90065
Area code(s)323

Glassell Park is a neighborhood in northeast Los Angeles, California.

Contents

Geography

Glassell Park borders Atwater Village and the Los Angeles River on the west, the city of Glendale on the northwest, Eagle Rock on the northeast, Mount Washington on the southeast and Cypress Park on the south. The district's boundaries are roughly the city of Glendale on the north, the Los Angeles River on the west, Division Street on the southeast, El Paso Drive and York Boulevard on the northeast.

The neighborhood is split between Los Angeles City Council District 13 and District 14, with a small portion in District 1.[1] It is part of California's 31st congressional district, lies within zip code 90065, and the area code is 323.

The neighborhood is located in a relatively hilly region of Los Angeles. While the hills often provide spectacular views, they can also become unstable, as happened during the unusually wet 2004-05 rainy season, during which hillsides slid down and destroyed several houses.[2] Like many hillside areas in Southern California, hillside areas of Glassell Park are susceptible to wildfires, leading the LAFD to impose parking restrictions on certain streets during high-fire-danger "red flag" days.[3]

Transportation

Located 5 miles north of Downtown Los Angeles, thoroughfares running through Glassell Park provide relatively easy access to most parts of Los Angeles, including the San Fernando Valley and San Gabriel Valley. The Glendale Freeway runs through the neighborhood, connecting with the Ventura Freeway to the north and with the Golden State Freeway to the south and terminating shortly thereafter at Glendale Boulevard. Plans had originally called for the freeway to extend to Santa Monica. Major arterial streets include Eagle Rock Boulevard and San Fernando Road. Glassell Park also has a designated bike lane along Eagle Rock Blvd. south of York. There is a movement to connect these bike paths with a larger grid.

History

The land that would later become Glassell Park was originally part of Rancho San Rafael, granted in 1784 to Spanish army corporal José María Verdugo. Attorney Andrew Glassell received part of Rancho San Rafael from the lawsuit known as the Great Partition of 1871. Glassell eventually settled in the area with his family, for whom many streets, including Toland Way, Drew, Andrita and Marguarite Streets are named.[4]

The development of Glassell Park began in the early 20th Century, as subdivisions between Verdugo and San Fernando Roads began to be sold in 1907. In 1912, the city of Los Angeles annexed most of Glassell Park, annexing the remainder in 1916.[5] The Glassell family continued to subdivide their land, selling off what is now Forest Lawn Memorial Park during the Great Depression. The growing neighborhood was served by a line of the Los Angeles Railway, which traveled in the median of Eagle Rock Boulevard towards Eagle Rock.[6] Today, Glassell Park is rediscovering its history from the Verdugo era. Glassell Park also hosts the historical road of trade between the Verdugo Rancho and the fledging Pueblo of Los Angeles. This road is called Verdugo Road, which historically met up with San Fernando Road.

The neighborhood

Today Glassell Park is largely working class, Latino, White, and Filipino.[7] The neighborhood has been significantly affected by the Southern California real estate boom that began in the early 2000s. An influx of middle-class families have moved into the neighborhood, attracted by the abundance of Craftsman homes and relatively low prices. Despite such gentrification, sections of Glassell Park, however, have remained plagued by gang-related crime and violence.[8]

Near the center of Glassell Park, on Verdugo Road, is the Glassell Park Recreation Center.[9] Along San Fernando Road and adjacent to the L.A. River is the Rio de Los Angeles State Park, built on part of the Taylor Yard railway switching facility.[10]

Education

The Los Angeles Unified School District operates two public elementary schools and one middle school in Glassell Park:

The following private schools are located in Glassell Park:

Glassell Park is home to three charter schools:

Library services are provided by Los Angeles Public Library branch libraries in adjacent neighborhoods:

Notable residents

References

External links

Coordinates: 34°07′01″N 118°13′59″W / 34.11694°N 118.23306°W / 34.11694; -118.23306