Gillespie County, Texas

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Gillespie County, Texas
Gill C IMG 0822.JPG
The Gillespie County Courthouse in Fredericksburg
Map of Texas highlighting Gillespie County
Location in the state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded1848
Named forRobert Addison Gillespie
SeatFredericksburg
Largest cityFredericksburg
Area
 • Total1,062 sq mi (2,751 km2)
 • Land1,058 sq mi (2,740 km2)
 • Water3 sq mi (8 km2), 0.3%
Population
 • (2010)24,837
 • Density21/sq mi (8/km²)
Congressional district21st
Time zoneCentral: UTC-6/-5
Websitewww.gillespiecounty.org
 
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Gillespie County, Texas
Gill C IMG 0822.JPG
The Gillespie County Courthouse in Fredericksburg
Map of Texas highlighting Gillespie County
Location in the state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded1848
Named forRobert Addison Gillespie
SeatFredericksburg
Largest cityFredericksburg
Area
 • Total1,062 sq mi (2,751 km2)
 • Land1,058 sq mi (2,740 km2)
 • Water3 sq mi (8 km2), 0.3%
Population
 • (2010)24,837
 • Density21/sq mi (8/km²)
Congressional district21st
Time zoneCentral: UTC-6/-5
Websitewww.gillespiecounty.org

Gillespie County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 24,837.[1] The county seat is Fredericksburg.[2] It is located in the heart of the Texas Hill Country. Gillespie is named for Robert Addison Gillespie, a soldier in the Mexican-American War.

On December 15, 1847, a petition was submitted to create Gillespie County. In 1848, the legislature formed Gillespie County from Bexar and Travis counties. While the signers were overwhelmingly German immigrants, names also on the petition were Castillo, Pena, Munos, and a handful of non-German Anglo names.

Gillespie County comprises the Fredericksburg, TX Micropolitan Statistical Area.

History Timeline[edit]

For more details on this topic, see List of petitioners to create Gillespie County, Texas.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,062 square miles (2,750 km2), of which 1,058 square miles (2,740 km2) is land and 3 square miles (7.8 km2) (0.3%) is water.[49]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

National protected area[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
18501,240
18602,736120.6%
18703,56630.3%
18805,22846.6%
18907,05635.0%
19008,22916.6%
19109,44714.8%
192010,0156.0%
193011,02010.0%
194010,670−3.2%
195010,520−1.4%
196010,048−4.5%
197010,5535.0%
198013,53228.2%
199017,20427.1%
200020,81421.0%
201024,83719.3%
Est. 201225,1531.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[50]
1850-2010[51]
2012 Estimate[1]

As of the census[52] of 2000, there are 20,814 people in the county, organized into 8,521 households, and 6,083 families. The population density is 20 people per square mile (8/km²). There are 9,902 housing units at an average density of 9 per square mile (4/km²). The racial makeup of the county is 92.82% White, 0.33% Native American, 0.21% Black or African American, 0.18% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 5.27% from other races, and 1.18% from two or more races. 15.90% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. In 1990 there were approximately 3,000 speakers of Texas German in Gillespie and Kendall counties, but this is believed to have declined in the last two decades.[53]

There are 8,521 households out of which 25.90% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.10% are married couples living together, 7.00% have a female householder with no husband present, and 28.60% are non-families. 25.80% of all households are made up of individuals and 14.20% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.38 and the average family size is 2.84.

In the county, the population is spread out with 21.60% under the age of 18, 5.50% from 18 to 24, 21.20% from 25 to 44, 26.20% from 45 to 64, and 25.50% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 46 years. For every 100 females there are 89.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 88.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county is $38,109, and the median income for a family is $45,315. Males have a median income of $26,675 versus $20,918 for females. The per capita income for the county is $20,423. 10.20% of the population and 7.10% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 13.40% of those under the age of 18 and 9.90% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line.


Politics[edit]

Gillespie County Presidential elections results
YearWinner
2008John McCain
2004George W. Bush
2000George W. Bush
1996Bob Dole
1992George Bush
1988George Bush
1984Ronald Reagan
1980Ronald Reagan
1976Gerald Ford
1972Richard Nixon
1968Richard Nixon
1964Lyndon Johnson
1960Richard Nixon
1956Dwight Eisenhower
1952Dwight Eisenhower
1948Thomas E. Dewey
1944Thomas E. Dewey
1940Wendell Willkie
1936Alf Landon
1932Franklin D. Roosevelt
1928Herbert Hoover

Gillespie County is somewhat of an aberration in that it is a historically Republican county in a state that was overwhelmingly Democratic up until recent decades. This is largely due to the heavily German American heritage of the county (German Americans tended to be historically Republican-leaning). Gillespie County has been won by Republicans in every election since 1896 with only a handful of exceptions. Theodore Roosevelt's Progressive Party won the county in 1912 (but carried no other counties in the state). In 1924, it was one of only two Texas counties won by Progressive candidate Robert M. LaFollette.[54] Gillespie County only backed the Democratic nominee in 1932 and 1964, both of which were landslide victories for the party, and has yet to do so again. In the last five Presidential elections no Democratic candidate has received more than 21% of the county's vote.[55]

As part of Texas's 11th congressional district it is currently represented by Republican Mike Conaway. In the 26 years prior to this the 11th district had been represented by Democrats Marvin Leath and Chet Edwards. On a local level it is part of Texas Senate, District 24 and is represented by Republican Troy Fraser. It is also part of the 73rd district of the Texas House of Representatives and is represented by Republican Doug Miller, who received the Taxpayer Advocate Award by Texans for Fiscal Responsibility and the "Champion for Free Enterprise Award" from the Texas Association of Business. Miller is also a former mayor of New Braunfels.

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Unincorporated places[edit]

Notable residents[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 16, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ a b c Kohout, Martin Donnell. "Gillespie County, Texas". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  4. ^ Brister, Louis E. "Adelsverein". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  5. ^ Ramos, Mary G. "The German Settlements in Central Texas". Texas Almanac. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  6. ^ "Indianola, Texas". Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  7. ^ Block, W T. "The Story of our Texas' German Pilgrims". Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  8. ^ "Near River Crossing Used by New Braunfels' First Settlers - New Braunfels, Comal County, Texas". William Nienke, Sam Morrow. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  9. ^ a b c d Smith, Cornelia Marshall; Tetzlaff, Otto W. "Meusebach, John O". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  10. ^ Kohout, Martin Donnell. "Fredericksburg, Texas". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  11. ^ "Comanche Indian Treaty". William Nienke, Sam Morrow. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  12. ^ "Signers of Petition to Create Gillespie County December 15, 1847". Texas Gen Web. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  13. ^ Kohout, Martin Donnell. "Vereins-Kirche". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  14. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 137. 
  15. ^ Spurlin, Charles D. "Gillespie, Robert Addison". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  16. ^ Brooks Jr, Paul R M. "Fort Martin Scott". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  17. ^ "Angry soldiers burn Fredericksburg store, destroying early Gillespie County records". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  18. ^ Beverly, Travis Wooster. "Gillespie County Records Destroyed". Texas Gen Web. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  19. ^ Pease, Elisha Marshall at Find a Grave
  20. ^ Biesele, R L; The Texas State Convention of Germans in 1854 (April 1930). The Southwestern Historical Quarterly. XXXIII (24). 
  21. ^ "Nimitz, Charles and Sophia". Der Stadt Friedhof. Gillespie County Historical Association. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  22. ^ Kohout, Martin Donnell. "Nimitz, Charles Henry". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  23. ^ "Nimitz Hotel". William Nienke, Sam Morrow. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  24. ^ Moneyhon, Charles H. "The Union League". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  25. ^ McGuire, James Patrick. "Kkuechler, Jacob". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  26. ^ Shook, Robert W. "Duff, James". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  27. ^ "Spring Creek Cemetery". Texas Gen Web. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  28. ^ Tegener, Gus at Find a Grave
  29. ^ "Site of the McDonald Massacre". William Nienke, Sam Morrow. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  30. ^ "Fugutives from Justice". Texas Gen Web. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  31. ^ "Treue der Union Monument". Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  32. ^ "List of Dead-Treue Der Union Monument". Texas Gen Web. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  33. ^ a b Lehmann, Herman; Hunter, J Marvin; Giese, Dale F (1993). Nine Years Among the Indians, 1870-1879: The Story of the Captivity and Life of a Texan Among the Indians. University of New Mexico Press. ISBN 978-0-8263-1417-8. 
  34. ^ Hudspeth, Brewster. "The Savage Life Of Herman Lehmann". Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 30 April 2010.  Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC.
  35. ^ "Site of The Andreas Lindig Lime Kiln". William Nienke, Sam Morrow. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  36. ^ "Gillespie County Fair". Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  37. ^ "Gillespie County Courthouse". Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 30 April 2010.  Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC.
  38. ^ Potter, Elmer Belmont (2008). Nimitz. Naval Institute Press. p. 26. ISBN 978-1-59114-580-6. 
  39. ^ John O Meusebach at Find a Grave
  40. ^ LBJ at Find a Grave
  41. ^ "Gillespie County Historical Society". Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  42. ^ Wentsch, George. "Pedernales Electric Cooperative". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  43. ^ "History of the Easter Fires". Texas Less Traveled. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  44. ^ a b c "President Lyndon B. Johnson's Biography". LBJ Library. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  45. ^ Nimitz at Find a Grave
  46. ^ "Pacific War Museum". Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  47. ^ a b c Kohout, Martin Donell. "Nimitz Museum". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  48. ^ Kohout, Martin Donell. "Enchanted Rock State Natural Area". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 13 November 2010. 
  49. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  50. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved December 16, 2013. 
  51. ^ Texas Almanac: County Population History 1850-2010 Retrieved December 16, 2013
  52. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  53. ^ The Death of Texas German in Gillespie County
  54. ^ [1]
  55. ^ The New York Times electoral map (Zoom in on Texas)
  56. ^ "Fisher Miller Colony Transfers". Texas General Land Office. Retrieved 26 May 2011. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 30°19′N 98°57′W / 30.31°N 98.95°W / 30.31; -98.95